1. bookVolume 37 (2021): Issue 1 (March 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-7367
First Published
01 Oct 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Panel Conditioning in the U.S. Consumer Expenditure Survey

Published Online: 13 Mar 2021
Volume & Issue: Volume 37 (2021) - Issue 1 (March 2021)
Page range: 53 - 69
Received: 01 May 2020
Accepted: 01 Dec 2020
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-7367
First Published
01 Oct 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The U.S. Consumer Expenditure Interview Survey asks many filter questions to identify the items that households purchase. Each reported purchase triggers follow-up questions about the amount spent and other details. We test the hypothesis that respondents learn how the questionnaire is structured and underreport purchases in later waves to reduce the length of the interview. We analyze data from 10,416 four-wave respondents over two years of data collection. We find no evidence of decreasing data quality over time; instead, panel respondents tend to give higher quality responses in later waves. The results also hold for a larger set of two-wave respondents.

Keywords

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