1. bookVolume 36 (2020): Issue 3 (September 2020)
    Special Issue on Nonresponse
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-7367
First Published
01 Oct 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Implementing Adaptive Survey Design with an Application to the Dutch Health Survey

Published Online: 24 Jul 2020
Page range: 609 - 629
Received: 01 Sep 2018
Accepted: 01 Oct 2019
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-7367
First Published
01 Oct 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Adaptive survey design has attracted great interest in recent years, but the number of case studies describing actual implementation is still thin. Reasons for this may be the gap between survey methodology and data collection, practical complications in differentiating effort across sample units and lack of flexibility of survey case management systems. Currently, adaptive survey design is a standard option in redesigns of person and household surveys at Statistics Netherlands and it has been implemented for the Dutch Health survey in 2018. In this article, the implementation of static adaptive survey designs is described and motivated with a focus on practical feasibility.

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