1. bookVolume 19 (2019): Issue 1 (June 2019)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Is Leather Skirt Designed by Urameselgwa a Symbol of Datooga’s Identity?

Published Online: 26 Nov 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 19 (2019) - Issue 1 (June 2019)
Page range: 14 - 35
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-7877
First Published
15 Jun 2014
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The paper focuses on the context of a traditional women’s wearing component – a leather skirt – on the example of the contemporary semi-nomadic Datooga1 and ideas, imaginations, and myths which this product of material culture represents. Analysis of the researched material composed from the statements of the daily users (married women) as well as the members of the society on example of the Datooga people (Buradiga subgroup) in a particular locality of Igunga district in Tanzania will demonstrate why the leather skirt, linked and designed by women’s deity Urameselgwa, is considered not only as a sign of marriage from the external perspective through outsider’s eyes, but mostly as an identification factor and strong cultural symbol through the Buradiga’s perception. The author explains how Urameselgwa is presented in the daily routine of the Buradiga’ women and which kind of privilege, so unique among East African pastoralists, is given to them by the wearing of the leather skirt transmitted from one generation to the other.

Keywords

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