1. bookVolume 19 (2019): Issue 3 (July 2019)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Open Access

The Effect of Administration of Copper Nanoparticles in Drinking Water on Redox Reactions in the Liver and Breast Muscle of Broiler Chickens

Published Online: 30 Jul 2019
Volume & Issue: Volume 19 (2019) - Issue 3 (July 2019)
Page range: 663 - 677
Received: 18 Oct 2018
Accepted: 05 Feb 2019
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine what dosage of copper nanoparticles added in the form of a hydrocolloid to standard dietary supplementation with copper sulphate will increase the antioxidant potential in the liver and breast muscle of chickens. In total, 126 one-day-old Ross 308 chickens were assigned to 7 experimental groups of 18 birds each (3 replications of 6 individuals each). The basal-diet treatment did not receive nano-Cu. Experimental groups received nano-Cu (0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg body weight per day) via a tube into the crop over three 3-day periods (days 8–10, 22–24 and 36–38) or three 7-day periods (days 8–14, 22–28 and 36–42). Dietary supplementation of chickens with nano-Cu to exceed the Cu level recommended by the NRC increased the content of Cu (P=0.042) while reducing that of Zn in the liver (P=0.031) and breast muscle (P=0.036). Supplementing the diet of chickens with nano-Cu to a level exceeding the level of copper recommended by the NRC by 7% to 25% increased the antioxidant potential of the liver and the breast meat. The study has shown that the antioxidant status of the liver and breast meat of chickens can be improved by supplementing the standard dietary copper sulphate supplement with the addition of nano-Cu, but to a level not exceeding 25% of the copper content recommended by NRC (1994) for broiler chickens, but the most safe is the nano-Cu level not exceeding 7% of the copper content recommended by NRC (1994).

Keywords

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