1. bookVolume 60 (2011): Issue 1-6 (December 2011)
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eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
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Open Access

Genetic Variation in Needle Epicuticular Wax Characteristics in Pinus Pinceana Seedlings

Published Online: 05 Aug 2017
Volume & Issue: Volume 60 (2011) - Issue 1-6 (December 2011)
Page range: 210 - 215
Received: 23 Nov 2010
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Seedlings from each of 12 Pinus pinceana populations from throughout the species’ range in Mexico were evaluated in a common-garden test to (1) determine the level of genetic variation and genetic structure of epicuticular needle wax quantity, (2) examine differences in wax chemical composition, and (3) seek evidence for an adaptive response in wax composition and quantity across environmental and geographic gradients. Regions and populations within regions showed high variation (38.2% and 10.5%, respectively, of the total variation) in wax quantity. Epicuticular wax recovered from primary needles of P. pinceana comprised eight classes. Secondary alcohols (71.7%) were the major homologs identified by gas chromatography. Seedlings from the northern region were separated based on wax composition from seedlings from the central and southern regions by canonical discriminant analysis. A strong differentiation among regions (QSTR=0.571) and populations within regions (QSTP(R)=0.384) was observed for wax quantity. Data on wax quantity and chemical composition indicate that physicochemical characteristics of epicuticular wax may show adaptation of P. pinceana to local environments.

Keywords

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