1. bookVolume 60 (2011): Issue 1-6 (December 2011)
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eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
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1 time per year
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English
Open Access

Primer Note: Development of Highly Polymorphic Nuclear Microsatellite Markers for Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa)

Published Online: 05 Aug 2017
Volume & Issue: Volume 60 (2011) - Issue 1-6 (December 2011)
Page range: 62 - 65
Received: 04 Nov 2009
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

We developed 32 microsatellite markers from an enriched genomic DNA library of hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa), one of the most important Japanese forestry conifer species. From a total of 1,056 cloned plasmids, 96 sequence-specific primer pairs were designed from 110 candidate clones. We selected 32 primers that showed successful amplification and marked polymorphism and evaluated their characteristics using DNA from 38 C. obtusa elite trees planted in the Forest Tree Breeding Center. The markers were highly polymorphic, with the number of alleles ranging from 8 to 32 (mean: 20.09), and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.811 to 0.958 (mean: 0.901). Progress in breeding projects and studies of the ecological genetics of this species can be expected through the use of this enlarged marker pool.

Keywords

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