1. bookVolume 19 (2017): Issue 4 (December 2017)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1899-4741
First Published
03 Jul 2007
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Iridoids from Cornus mas L. and their potential as innovative ingredients in cosmetics

Published Online: 29 Dec 2017
Page range: 122 - 127
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1899-4741
First Published
03 Jul 2007
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Dogwood berries represent a valuable source of a variety of active ingredients. A group that deserves special attention comprises iridoids – compounds with potent antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antibacterial properties. The present study is an attempt to obtain an innovative plant material from dogwood berries. To this end, water and water/ethanol-based extracts (1:1) were prepared and, as the next step, an iridoids-rich fraction was isolated. The total content of iridoids was determined spectrophotometrically, and antioxidant properties of the isolates were concurrently assessed. Additionally, skin whitening activity of isolated fractions was assessed on the basis of tyrosinase inhibition measurement. The testing schedule also involved the formulation of model washing systems based on anionic surfactants. The effect of adding the fractions obtained by the above method on the irritant potential was assessed by determining the zein number

Keywords

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