1. bookVolume 61 (2016): Issue 1 (March 2016)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1508-5791
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Application of instruments of nuclear physics to the calculation of theoretical dose distributions in various organs of the human body for beams used in hadrontherapy

Published Online: 17 Mar 2016
Volume & Issue: Volume 61 (2016) - Issue 1 (March 2016)
Page range: 19 - 22
Received: 31 Aug 2014
Accepted: 04 Sep 2015
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1508-5791
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The area of interests of nuclear physics are studies of reactions, wherein atomic nuclei of projectile collide with target nuclei. An amount of energy lost by projectile nucleus during its passing through the target is a major issue – it is important to know how charged particles interact with matter. It is possible to afford this knowledge by using theoretical programs that calculate energy loss applying the Bethe-Bloch equation. Hadrontherapy, which is a field of still growing interest, is based on the interactions of charged particles with matter. Therefore, there exists a need of creating a simple model that could be used to the calculation of dose distributions in biological matter. Two programs (SRIM, Xeloss), used to the calculation of energy loss by nuclear physicist, have been adapted to determine the dose distributions in analogues of human tissues. Results of the calculations with those programs for beams used in hadrontherapy (e.g. 1H, 12C) will be compared with experimental data available in references.

Keywords

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