1. bookVolume 3 (2016): Issue 1 (June 2016)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2354-0036
First Published
16 Apr 2015
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Open Access

An Artist Without Wings? Regulation of Emotions Through Aesthetic Experiences

Published Online: 08 Jun 2016
Volume & Issue: Volume 3 (2016) - Issue 1 (June 2016)
Page range: 94 - 103
Received: 02 Feb 2016
Accepted: 20 Mar 2016
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2354-0036
First Published
16 Apr 2015
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Art can help handle difficult experiences. Art therapy sessions (healing through art) have been recognised for years as a well-known and efficient method of treatment. At the same time, one can observe people’s tendencies – apparently inefficient in terms of their well-being (emotions, mood) – to create or experience art (e.g. watching horror movies, listening to sad songs, expressive writing about one’s ordeals). Many authors have described the way negative emotions are regulated. Their research has not, however, exhausted the subject in relation to art. In this paper I discuss the regulation of emotions through art. I am interested in the process of regulating affective experiences, particularly through expressive writing, and in the impact this way of regulation has on task-oriented functioning, especially cognitive functioning.

Keywords

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