1. bookVolume 18 (2018): Issue 2 (May 2018)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Improved Milk Glutamine Level and Growth Performance of Suckling Piglets by Glutamine Supplementation in Maternal Diet

Published Online: 11 May 2018
Volume & Issue: Volume 18 (2018) - Issue 2 (May 2018)
Page range: 441 - 452
Received: 03 Jul 2017
Accepted: 22 Nov 2017
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2300-8733
First Published
25 Nov 2011
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Glutamine plays an important role in neonatal growth and health. It is unknown whether supplementing the lactating sows’ diet with glutamine will benefit the growth performance and intestinal development of suckling piglets through increasing content of milk glutamine. A total of 24 lactating sows (Large White) were fed diets supplemented with/without 1% glutamine throughout the 21-d lactation. Feed intake of the sows was recorded, blood and milk samples were collected. Piglets were weighed at birth and weaning, one piglet randomly selected from each litter was sacrificed for morphological analysis of the small intestine. Average daily feed intake of the sows did not differ between control and glutamine groups. Concentrations of total protein and urea nitrogen in sows’ serum was increased by glutamine at d 14 of lactation (P<0.05). Contents of glutamine in both plasma and milk of sows were significantly increased by glutamine supplementation throughout lactation (P<0.01). Concentrations of proline, citrulline, valine, isoleucine, leucine, and arginine in sows’ plasma were increased by glutamine supplementation (all P<0.05). Milk yield was increased by glutamine supplementation at d 14 and 21 of lactation (P<0.05). Supplementing the lactating sows’ diet with glutamine increased average daily gain (P=0.006), weaning weight (P=0.032), as well as villous height and ratio of villous height:crypt depth in duodenum of the suckling piglets (both P<0.05). Collectively, supplementing lactating sows’ diet with 1% glutamine significantly improved the growth performance of suckling piglets through elevating milk yield and glutamine content in the milk.

Keywords

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