1. bookVolume 66 (2016): Issue 3 (September 2016)
Journal Details
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Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
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4 times per year
Languages
English
Open Access

Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 on Intestinal Bacterial Enzyme Activities in the Prevention of Cancer, Atherosclerosis and Dysbiosis

Published Online: 29 Sep 2016
Volume & Issue: Volume 66 (2016) - Issue 3 (September 2016)
Page range: 294 - 303
Received: 17 Feb 2016
Accepted: 02 Jun 2016
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 on intestinal bacterial enzyme activities – β-glucuronidase (β-GLUCUR), β-galactosidase (β-GAL), and β-glucosidase (β-GLU) in the prevention of cancer, atherosclerosis and dysbiosis was investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 12 experimental groups: C (control group), AT (atherosclerotic group), CC (carcinogenic group), and then each group in combination with antibiotics and probiotics individually and each group in double combination on antibiotic and probiotic. In the control group the β-glucuronidase activity did not change throughout the experiment. High fat diet in the atherosclerotic group significantly increased the activity of β-glucuronidase (p<0.001) and β-glucosidase (p<0.01). Azoxymethane application in the carcinogenic group significantly increased β-glucuronidase (p<0.01), but reduced β-glucosidase (p<0.01). Daily application of probiotics individually and in double combination with antibiotics increased the activity of β-galactosidase, and β-glucosidase, and positively decreased the level of β-glucuronidase. In the control antibiotic group β-glucuronidase was significantly increased (p<0.05), and β-glucosidase decreased (p<0.01) which can be caused by a change of microflora in favor of coliform bacteria. These finding indicate the positive effects of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum LS/07 which allows its use in disease prevention in human and veterinary medicine.

Keywords

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