1. bookVolume 65 (2015): Issue 3 (September 2015)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Illegal Waste Sites As A Potential Micro Foci Of Mediterranean Leishmaniasis: First Records Of Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) From Slovenia

Published Online: 30 Sep 2015
Volume & Issue: Volume 65 (2015) - Issue 3 (September 2015)
Page range: 348 - 357
Received: 31 Jul 2014
Accepted: 13 Mar 2015
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1820-7448
First Published
25 Mar 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Apart from being against the law, illegal waste dumping also poses a threat to human health and to the environment. Solid and decomposing waste is an ideal breeding ground for a number of rodents, insects, and other vermin that pose a health risk through the spread of infectious diseases. The main objective of this study was to survey disease vectors and rodents for the presence of Leishmania sp. from waste sites along the Istrian Peninsula in Slovenia and Croatia.

During the survey five sandfly (Phlebotomus neglectus, P. perniciosus, P. papatasi, P. mascitii, Sergentomyia minuta) and five rodent species were collected (Rattus rattus, Mus musculus, Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis and A. sylvaticus).

Sandflies and rodents were screened using a molecular probe to amplify an approximately 120 bp fragment of the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle for the detection of Leishmania sp. parasites. Leishmania infantum DNA was detected in the spleen of one juvenile black rat (R. rattus). Despite few published records on Leshmania sp. infection in black rats, the addition of our record highlights the importance of further investigation into the frequency and distribution of such occurrences so that we may better classify the role of rodents as potential reservoirs of leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin.

Keywords

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