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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1647-659X
First Published
01 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 17 (2016): Issue 1 (December 2016)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1647-659X
First Published
01 Mar 2016
Publication timeframe
3 times per year
Languages
English

Search

8 Articles
access type Open Access

From Toys to Games: Overcoming the View of Natural Selection as a Filter

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 1 - 24

Abstract

access type Open Access

Presentation of the Dossier ‘Models and Fictions’

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 25 - 27

Abstract

access type Open Access

The Nature of Fiction/al Utterances

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 28 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, first of all, I want to try a new defense of the utterance approach as to the relationship between fictional and nonfictional works on the one hand and between fictional and nonfictional utterances on the other hand, notably the idea that the distinction between fictional and nonfictional works is derivative on the distinction between fictional and nonfictional utterances of the sentences that constitute a text. Moreover, I want to account for the second distinction in minimally contextualist semantic terms. Finally, I want to hold that what makes a fictional utterance, hence a fictional work, properly fictional is the contextually pre-semantic fact that its utterer entertains an act of make-believe, where such an act is accounted for in metarepresentational terms. This ultimately means that the fiction/nonfiction distinction is not clarified in terms of the fictional works/nonfictional works distinction, for things rather go the other way around.

Keywords

  • fiction/nonfiction
  • fictional/nonfictional works
  • utterance approach
  • minimally contextualist account
  • metarepresentation
access type Open Access

Centaurs, Pegasus, Sherlock Holmes: Against the Prejudice in Favour of the Real

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 56 - 72

Abstract

Abstract

Meinong’s thought has been rediscovered in recent times by analytic philosophy: his object theory has significant consequences in formal ontology, and especially his account of impossible objects has proved itself to be decisive in a wide range of fields, from logic up to ontology of fiction. Rejecting the traditional ‘prejudice in favour of the real’, Meinong investigates what there is not: a peculiar non-existing object is precisely the fictional object, which exemplifies a number of properties (like Sherlock Holmes, who lives in Baker Street and is an outstanding detective) without existing in the same way as flesh-and-blood detectives do. Fictional objects are in some sense incomplete objects, whose core of constituent properties is not completely determined. Now, what does it imply to hold that a fictional object may also occur in true statements? We shall deal with the objections raised by Russell and Quine against Meinong’s view, pointing out limits and advantages of both perspectives.

Keywords

  • Ontology of fiction
  • Meinong
  • classical quantification
  • Quine
  • meta-ontology
access type Open Access

Scientific Models and Games of Make-Believe: A Modal-Logical Perspective

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 73 - 109

Abstract

access type Open Access

Hypothetical, not Fictional Worlds

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 110 - 136

Abstract

Abstract

This paper critically analyzes the fiction-view of scientific modeling, which exploits presumed analogies between literary fiction and model building in science. The basic idea is that in both fiction and scientific modeling fictional worlds are created. The paper argues that the fiction-view comes closest to certain scientific thought experiments, especially those involving demons in science and to literary movements like naturalism. But the paper concludes that the dissimilarities prevail over the similarities. The fiction-view fails to do justice to the plurality of model types used in science; it fails to realize that a function like idealization only makes sense in science because models, unlike works of fiction, can be de-idealized; it fails to distinguish sufficiently between the make-believe (fictional) worlds created in fiction and the hypothetical (as-if) worlds envisaged in models. Representation characterized in the fiction-view as a license to draw inferences does not sufficiently distinguish between inferences in fiction from inferences in scientific modeling. To highlight the contrast the paper proposes to explicate representation in terms of satisfaction of constraints.

Keywords

  • Abstraction
  • constraints
  • fiction-view
  • hypothetical worlds
  • idealization
  • models
  • representation
access type Open Access

The question of Fiction – nonexistent objects, a possible world response from Paul Ricoeur

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 137 - 153

Abstract

Abstract

The question of fiction is omnipresent within the work of Paul Ricoeur throughout his prolific career. However, Ricoeur raises the questions of fiction in relation to other issues such the symbol, metaphor and narrative. This article sets out to foreground a traditional problem of fiction and logic, which is termed the existence of non-existent objects, in relation to the Paul Ricoeur’s work on narrative. Ricoeur’s understanding of fiction takes place within his overall philosophical anthropology where the fictions and histories make up the very nature of identity both personal and collective. The existence of non-existent objects demonstrates a dichotomy between fiction and history, non-existent objects can exist as fictional objects. The very possibility of the existence of fictional objects entails ontological status considerations. What ontological status do fictional objects have? Ricoeur develops a concept of narrative configuration which is akin to the Kantian productive imagination and configuration frames the question historical narrative and fictional narrative. It is demonstrated that the ontological status of fictional objects can be best understood in a model of possible worlds.

Keywords

  • Ricoeur
  • fiction
  • nonexistent object
  • configurational narrative
  • ontological status
access type Open Access

Review of Alfredo Ferrarin, The Powers of Pure Reason: Kant and the Idea of Cosmic Philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 154 - 158

Abstract

8 Articles
access type Open Access

From Toys to Games: Overcoming the View of Natural Selection as a Filter

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 1 - 24

Abstract

access type Open Access

Presentation of the Dossier ‘Models and Fictions’

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 25 - 27

Abstract

access type Open Access

The Nature of Fiction/al Utterances

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 28 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, first of all, I want to try a new defense of the utterance approach as to the relationship between fictional and nonfictional works on the one hand and between fictional and nonfictional utterances on the other hand, notably the idea that the distinction between fictional and nonfictional works is derivative on the distinction between fictional and nonfictional utterances of the sentences that constitute a text. Moreover, I want to account for the second distinction in minimally contextualist semantic terms. Finally, I want to hold that what makes a fictional utterance, hence a fictional work, properly fictional is the contextually pre-semantic fact that its utterer entertains an act of make-believe, where such an act is accounted for in metarepresentational terms. This ultimately means that the fiction/nonfiction distinction is not clarified in terms of the fictional works/nonfictional works distinction, for things rather go the other way around.

Keywords

  • fiction/nonfiction
  • fictional/nonfictional works
  • utterance approach
  • minimally contextualist account
  • metarepresentation
access type Open Access

Centaurs, Pegasus, Sherlock Holmes: Against the Prejudice in Favour of the Real

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 56 - 72

Abstract

Abstract

Meinong’s thought has been rediscovered in recent times by analytic philosophy: his object theory has significant consequences in formal ontology, and especially his account of impossible objects has proved itself to be decisive in a wide range of fields, from logic up to ontology of fiction. Rejecting the traditional ‘prejudice in favour of the real’, Meinong investigates what there is not: a peculiar non-existing object is precisely the fictional object, which exemplifies a number of properties (like Sherlock Holmes, who lives in Baker Street and is an outstanding detective) without existing in the same way as flesh-and-blood detectives do. Fictional objects are in some sense incomplete objects, whose core of constituent properties is not completely determined. Now, what does it imply to hold that a fictional object may also occur in true statements? We shall deal with the objections raised by Russell and Quine against Meinong’s view, pointing out limits and advantages of both perspectives.

Keywords

  • Ontology of fiction
  • Meinong
  • classical quantification
  • Quine
  • meta-ontology
access type Open Access

Scientific Models and Games of Make-Believe: A Modal-Logical Perspective

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 73 - 109

Abstract

access type Open Access

Hypothetical, not Fictional Worlds

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 110 - 136

Abstract

Abstract

This paper critically analyzes the fiction-view of scientific modeling, which exploits presumed analogies between literary fiction and model building in science. The basic idea is that in both fiction and scientific modeling fictional worlds are created. The paper argues that the fiction-view comes closest to certain scientific thought experiments, especially those involving demons in science and to literary movements like naturalism. But the paper concludes that the dissimilarities prevail over the similarities. The fiction-view fails to do justice to the plurality of model types used in science; it fails to realize that a function like idealization only makes sense in science because models, unlike works of fiction, can be de-idealized; it fails to distinguish sufficiently between the make-believe (fictional) worlds created in fiction and the hypothetical (as-if) worlds envisaged in models. Representation characterized in the fiction-view as a license to draw inferences does not sufficiently distinguish between inferences in fiction from inferences in scientific modeling. To highlight the contrast the paper proposes to explicate representation in terms of satisfaction of constraints.

Keywords

  • Abstraction
  • constraints
  • fiction-view
  • hypothetical worlds
  • idealization
  • models
  • representation
access type Open Access

The question of Fiction – nonexistent objects, a possible world response from Paul Ricoeur

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 137 - 153

Abstract

Abstract

The question of fiction is omnipresent within the work of Paul Ricoeur throughout his prolific career. However, Ricoeur raises the questions of fiction in relation to other issues such the symbol, metaphor and narrative. This article sets out to foreground a traditional problem of fiction and logic, which is termed the existence of non-existent objects, in relation to the Paul Ricoeur’s work on narrative. Ricoeur’s understanding of fiction takes place within his overall philosophical anthropology where the fictions and histories make up the very nature of identity both personal and collective. The existence of non-existent objects demonstrates a dichotomy between fiction and history, non-existent objects can exist as fictional objects. The very possibility of the existence of fictional objects entails ontological status considerations. What ontological status do fictional objects have? Ricoeur develops a concept of narrative configuration which is akin to the Kantian productive imagination and configuration frames the question historical narrative and fictional narrative. It is demonstrated that the ontological status of fictional objects can be best understood in a model of possible worlds.

Keywords

  • Ricoeur
  • fiction
  • nonexistent object
  • configurational narrative
  • ontological status
access type Open Access

Review of Alfredo Ferrarin, The Powers of Pure Reason: Kant and the Idea of Cosmic Philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015

Published Online: 25 Jan 2017
Page range: 154 - 158

Abstract

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