1. bookVolume 66 (2018): Issue 2 (May 2018)
Journal Details
License
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Journal
eISSN
2449-9471
First Published
15 Apr 2015
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4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

An absence of rights: Homeless families and social housing marketisation in Ireland

Published Online: 26 May 2018
Page range: 9 - 31
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2449-9471
First Published
15 Apr 2015
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

This paper discusses the outcomes of a participatory research process with homeless parents living in Dublin-based emergency accommodation, during which a critical appraisal of a range of government schemes was coconstructed. The focus is on examining the impacts on vulnerable families of the marketisation of social housing. This is examined through the homeless families’ attempts to procure private rented housing using the Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) and their experience of life in family hub emergency accommodation. The significant challenges experienced by homeless families are examined from the perspectives of human rights and capability theory. The paper concludes that the Rent Supplement, Rental Accommodation Scheme and HAP are costly market-oriented schemes and unlikely to provide satisfactory long-term housing solutions, while family hubs are far from ideal from a capability or human rights perspective. Only a significant increase in the direct provision of social housing by local authorities and housing associations can provide ontological security and well-being, and advance human-rights-based social housing.

Keywords

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