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Migration and Those Left Behind

Tom 10 (2019): Zeszyt 1 (June 2019)

Informacje o czasopiśmie
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2520-1786
Pierwsze wydanie
30 Apr 2019
Częstotliwość wydawania
1 raz w roku
Języki
Angielski

Wyszukiwanie

Tom 10 (2019): Zeszyt 2 (August 2019)
Migration and Those Left Behind

Informacje o czasopiśmie
Format
Czasopismo
eISSN
2520-1786
Pierwsze wydanie
30 Apr 2019
Częstotliwość wydawania
1 raz w roku
Języki
Angielski

Wyszukiwanie

3 Artykułów

This collection of studies considers the impact of migration in the Global South on those who do not migrate: children, partners, and families left behind; sending communities; and national economies. In so doing, it speaks to continuing research and policy discussions on the ‘migration-development nexus’ and the role of migrants and migrant networks as development agents. While South-South migration today exceeds South-North migration, much of the related literature has dealt with the latter. In focusing on migration within the Global South, including movements within as well as between countries, the present collection offers new targeted consideration of Southern migration in these processes. The studies in this collection draw on a variety of cases, including focused consideration of evidence from Ghana, South Africa, Ethiopia, Morocco, Indonesia, Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia. Guest Editors: Rachel Gisselquist and Finn Tarp

Otwarty dostęp

Fragmenting the Family? The Complexity of Household Migration Strategies in Post-apartheid South Africa

Data publikacji: 14 Aug 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

The disruption of family life is one of the important legacies of South Africa’s colonial and apartheid history. Families were undermined by deliberate strategies implemented through the pass laws, forced removals, urban housing policy, and the creation of homelands. Despite the removal of legal restrictions on permanent urban settlement and family co-residence for Africans, patterns of internal and oscillating labor migration have endured, dual or stretched households continue to link urban and rural nodes, children have remained less urbanized than adults, and many grow up without coresident parents. Although children are clearly affected by adult labor migration, they have tended to be ignored in the migration discourse. In this study, we add to the literature by showing how a child lens advances our understanding of the complexities of household arrangements and migration processes for families. In a mixed-methods study, we use nationally representative panel data to describe persistence, and also change, in migration patterns in South Africa when viewed from the perspective of children. We then draw on a detailed case study to explore what factors constrain or permit families to migrate together, or children to join adults at migration destination areas.

Słowa kluczowe

  • children
  • family migration
  • household strategies
  • mixed methods
  • South Africa

JEL Classification

  • O15
  • J13
Otwarty dostęp

Diaspora Externalities

Data publikacji: 27 Aug 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

This review article surveys the recent economic literature on diaspora networks, globalization, and development. Diasporas are shown to contribute to the economic and cultural integration of source (i.e., developing) countries into the global economy. I first review the effect of diaspora networks on core globalization outcomes such as trade, foreign investments, and the diffusion of knowledge and technology across borders. I then turn to the cultural and political sway of the diaspora, investigating the impact of emigration on the formation of political attitudes, fertility behavior, and other aspects of culture in the home country.

Słowa kluczowe

  • diasporas
  • globalization
  • international migration
  • development
  • brain drain
  • trade
  • FDI
  • knowledge diffusion
  • social remittances
  • cultural convergence

JEL Classification

  • F21
  • F22
  • F63
  • J61
  • O11
  • O15
Otwarty dostęp

Labor Migration in Indonesia and the Health of Children Left Behind

Data publikacji: 08 Sep 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

Economic research on labor migration in the developing world has traditionally focused on the role played by the remittances of overseas migrant labor in the sending country’s economy. Recently, due in no small part to the availability of rich microdata, more attention has been paid to the effects of migration on the lives of family members left behind. This paper examines how the temporary migration of parents for work affects the health outcomes of children left behind using the longitudinal data obtained from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. The anthropometric measure of the child health used, height-for-age, serves as a proxy for stunting. The evidence suggests that whether parental migration is beneficial or deleterious to the child health depends on which parent moved. In particular, migration of the mother has an adverse effect on the child’s height-for-age, reducing height-for-age Z-score by 0.5 standard deviations. This effect is not seen on the migration of the father.

Słowa kluczowe

  • health
  • labor
  • migration
  • children
  • families left behind

JEL Classification

  • I15
  • J61
  • O15
  • R23
3 Artykułów

This collection of studies considers the impact of migration in the Global South on those who do not migrate: children, partners, and families left behind; sending communities; and national economies. In so doing, it speaks to continuing research and policy discussions on the ‘migration-development nexus’ and the role of migrants and migrant networks as development agents. While South-South migration today exceeds South-North migration, much of the related literature has dealt with the latter. In focusing on migration within the Global South, including movements within as well as between countries, the present collection offers new targeted consideration of Southern migration in these processes. The studies in this collection draw on a variety of cases, including focused consideration of evidence from Ghana, South Africa, Ethiopia, Morocco, Indonesia, Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia. Guest Editors: Rachel Gisselquist and Finn Tarp

Otwarty dostęp

Fragmenting the Family? The Complexity of Household Migration Strategies in Post-apartheid South Africa

Data publikacji: 14 Aug 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

The disruption of family life is one of the important legacies of South Africa’s colonial and apartheid history. Families were undermined by deliberate strategies implemented through the pass laws, forced removals, urban housing policy, and the creation of homelands. Despite the removal of legal restrictions on permanent urban settlement and family co-residence for Africans, patterns of internal and oscillating labor migration have endured, dual or stretched households continue to link urban and rural nodes, children have remained less urbanized than adults, and many grow up without coresident parents. Although children are clearly affected by adult labor migration, they have tended to be ignored in the migration discourse. In this study, we add to the literature by showing how a child lens advances our understanding of the complexities of household arrangements and migration processes for families. In a mixed-methods study, we use nationally representative panel data to describe persistence, and also change, in migration patterns in South Africa when viewed from the perspective of children. We then draw on a detailed case study to explore what factors constrain or permit families to migrate together, or children to join adults at migration destination areas.

Słowa kluczowe

  • children
  • family migration
  • household strategies
  • mixed methods
  • South Africa

JEL Classification

  • O15
  • J13
Otwarty dostęp

Diaspora Externalities

Data publikacji: 27 Aug 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

This review article surveys the recent economic literature on diaspora networks, globalization, and development. Diasporas are shown to contribute to the economic and cultural integration of source (i.e., developing) countries into the global economy. I first review the effect of diaspora networks on core globalization outcomes such as trade, foreign investments, and the diffusion of knowledge and technology across borders. I then turn to the cultural and political sway of the diaspora, investigating the impact of emigration on the formation of political attitudes, fertility behavior, and other aspects of culture in the home country.

Słowa kluczowe

  • diasporas
  • globalization
  • international migration
  • development
  • brain drain
  • trade
  • FDI
  • knowledge diffusion
  • social remittances
  • cultural convergence

JEL Classification

  • F21
  • F22
  • F63
  • J61
  • O11
  • O15
Otwarty dostęp

Labor Migration in Indonesia and the Health of Children Left Behind

Data publikacji: 08 Sep 2019
Zakres stron: -

Abstrakt

Abstract

Economic research on labor migration in the developing world has traditionally focused on the role played by the remittances of overseas migrant labor in the sending country’s economy. Recently, due in no small part to the availability of rich microdata, more attention has been paid to the effects of migration on the lives of family members left behind. This paper examines how the temporary migration of parents for work affects the health outcomes of children left behind using the longitudinal data obtained from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. The anthropometric measure of the child health used, height-for-age, serves as a proxy for stunting. The evidence suggests that whether parental migration is beneficial or deleterious to the child health depends on which parent moved. In particular, migration of the mother has an adverse effect on the child’s height-for-age, reducing height-for-age Z-score by 0.5 standard deviations. This effect is not seen on the migration of the father.

Słowa kluczowe

  • health
  • labor
  • migration
  • children
  • families left behind

JEL Classification

  • I15
  • J61
  • O15
  • R23

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