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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-5119
First Published
01 Mar 2013
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 41 (2020): Issue 2 (June 2020)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2001-5119
First Published
01 Mar 2013
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles
Open Access

Establishment versus Newcomers, Critical versus Administrative?: Sketching the structure of the Swedish field of media and communication studies

Published Online: 17 Jun 2020
Page range: 109 - 125

Abstract

Abstract

The status of the field of media and communication studies has been debated globally and domestically. This study covers virtually all agents (N=254) in the Swedish field of media and communication studies and draws on Pierre Bourdieu's sociology of science to uncover the main hierarchies in the field. The study focuses on two main divisions. Like in most fields, the most prevalent division is found between the field's incumbents and the challengers/newcomers. A parallel, albeit less prevalent, division is an onto-epistemological one – a variant of the old cleavage between “critical” and “administrative” research. The field's power elite is almost exclusively male, and connected to the field's pioneering institutions.

Keywords

  • sociology of science
  • field theory
  • media and communication studies
  • multiple correspondence analysis
  • academia
Open Access

Comparing Digital Communication Systems: An empirical framework for analysing the political economy of digital infrastructures

Published Online: 24 Oct 2020
Page range: 127 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

This article offers a research tool for comparative studies of digital communication systems. It brings together the fields of infrastructure studies, Internet governance, and political economy of the Internet with the tradition of systemic media analysis and argues that existing frameworks are inadequate for capturing regulatory and power structures in a complex digital environment. In the article, we develop a framework for conceptualising and mapping the components of digital communication systems – the DCS framework – and operationalise it for standardised measurements by outlining twelve key indicators that can be analysed using empirical data from a number of existing databases. The framework provides a basis for measuring and comparing digital communication systems across national or regional contexts, and thereby developing new typologies for how to understand structural differences and similarities.

Keywords

  • digital communication system
  • infrastructure
  • media system analysis
  • Internet governance
  • political economy
Open Access

A Longitudinal Analysis of Swedish Local Governments on Facebook: A visualisation of communication

Published Online: 19 Nov 2020
Page range: 147 - 162

Abstract

Abstract

Facebook has become an essential channel for local governments to convey information and interact with citizens, and communication on the platform has been studied intensively through a range of smaller case studies in various countries. By looking at the development of Swedish municipalities’ Facebook usage between 2009 and 2017, this article attempts to frame such use in a longitudinal perspective. Based on more than 85,000 posts from 38 Swedish local governments, the findings show that most municipalities have adapted to an online visual culture, using photos and videos “to go viral”. The findings also show large increases in interactions, such as sharing and liking, whilst commenting appears to lag behind. It also shows that local government Facebook pages retain a strong, yet decreasing, tie with government web pages, visible through a tendency of the Facebook page to recycle information from the web page.

Keywords

  • local government
  • social media
  • Sweden
  • information recycling
  • visualisation
Open Access

Exploring digital divides in older adults’ news consumption

Published Online: 01 Dec 2020
Page range: 163 - 177

Abstract

Abstract

Media structure is rapidly steering towards digital formats and distribution. Meanwhile, many Western societies have ageing populations, where older adults are less digitally active than the population at large. This, combined with the fact that the news media are crucial in providing information and fostering engagement and cohesion, means that the news consumption of older adults deserves scholarly attention. Based on national representative surveys, this article analyses the use of traditional and digital news among people aged 66 to 85 between 2014 and 2018. The findings show that the overall reading of newspapers is decreasing among pensioners of all ages, whereas radio and television news both have rather stable audience shares. Despite the overall decline of newspaper reading, the reading of digital newspapers is becoming more common, and digital newspapers seem, to some extent, to have replaced printed newspapers. Concerning factors explaining digital news consumption among the 65+ group, general Internet habits, sex, and political interest are shown to be the most important.

Keywords

  • news consumption
  • older adults
  • representative survey
  • replacement
  • complementarity
Open Access

Online Surveillance in a Swedish Context: Between acceptance and resistance

Published Online: 18 Dec 2020
Page range: 179 - 193

Abstract

Abstract

Users of digital media leave traces that corporations and authorities can harvest, systematise, and analyse; on the societal level, an overall result is the emergence of a surveillance culture. In this study, we examine how people handle the dilemma of leaving digital footprints: what they say they do to protect their privacy and what could legitimise the collection and storing of their data. Through a survey of almost 1,000 students at Umeå University in Sweden, we find that most respondents know that their data are used and choose to adjust their own behaviour rather than adopting technical solutions. In order to understand contemporary forms of surveillance, we call for a humanistic approach – an approach where hermeneutic and qualitative methods are central.

Keywords

  • online surveillance
  • surveillance culture
  • soft surveillance
  • privacy paradox
  • digital humanities
Open Access

Book Reviews

Published Online: 18 Dec 2020
Page range: 195 - 202

Abstract

6 Articles
Open Access

Establishment versus Newcomers, Critical versus Administrative?: Sketching the structure of the Swedish field of media and communication studies

Published Online: 17 Jun 2020
Page range: 109 - 125

Abstract

Abstract

The status of the field of media and communication studies has been debated globally and domestically. This study covers virtually all agents (N=254) in the Swedish field of media and communication studies and draws on Pierre Bourdieu's sociology of science to uncover the main hierarchies in the field. The study focuses on two main divisions. Like in most fields, the most prevalent division is found between the field's incumbents and the challengers/newcomers. A parallel, albeit less prevalent, division is an onto-epistemological one – a variant of the old cleavage between “critical” and “administrative” research. The field's power elite is almost exclusively male, and connected to the field's pioneering institutions.

Keywords

  • sociology of science
  • field theory
  • media and communication studies
  • multiple correspondence analysis
  • academia
Open Access

Comparing Digital Communication Systems: An empirical framework for analysing the political economy of digital infrastructures

Published Online: 24 Oct 2020
Page range: 127 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

This article offers a research tool for comparative studies of digital communication systems. It brings together the fields of infrastructure studies, Internet governance, and political economy of the Internet with the tradition of systemic media analysis and argues that existing frameworks are inadequate for capturing regulatory and power structures in a complex digital environment. In the article, we develop a framework for conceptualising and mapping the components of digital communication systems – the DCS framework – and operationalise it for standardised measurements by outlining twelve key indicators that can be analysed using empirical data from a number of existing databases. The framework provides a basis for measuring and comparing digital communication systems across national or regional contexts, and thereby developing new typologies for how to understand structural differences and similarities.

Keywords

  • digital communication system
  • infrastructure
  • media system analysis
  • Internet governance
  • political economy
Open Access

A Longitudinal Analysis of Swedish Local Governments on Facebook: A visualisation of communication

Published Online: 19 Nov 2020
Page range: 147 - 162

Abstract

Abstract

Facebook has become an essential channel for local governments to convey information and interact with citizens, and communication on the platform has been studied intensively through a range of smaller case studies in various countries. By looking at the development of Swedish municipalities’ Facebook usage between 2009 and 2017, this article attempts to frame such use in a longitudinal perspective. Based on more than 85,000 posts from 38 Swedish local governments, the findings show that most municipalities have adapted to an online visual culture, using photos and videos “to go viral”. The findings also show large increases in interactions, such as sharing and liking, whilst commenting appears to lag behind. It also shows that local government Facebook pages retain a strong, yet decreasing, tie with government web pages, visible through a tendency of the Facebook page to recycle information from the web page.

Keywords

  • local government
  • social media
  • Sweden
  • information recycling
  • visualisation
Open Access

Exploring digital divides in older adults’ news consumption

Published Online: 01 Dec 2020
Page range: 163 - 177

Abstract

Abstract

Media structure is rapidly steering towards digital formats and distribution. Meanwhile, many Western societies have ageing populations, where older adults are less digitally active than the population at large. This, combined with the fact that the news media are crucial in providing information and fostering engagement and cohesion, means that the news consumption of older adults deserves scholarly attention. Based on national representative surveys, this article analyses the use of traditional and digital news among people aged 66 to 85 between 2014 and 2018. The findings show that the overall reading of newspapers is decreasing among pensioners of all ages, whereas radio and television news both have rather stable audience shares. Despite the overall decline of newspaper reading, the reading of digital newspapers is becoming more common, and digital newspapers seem, to some extent, to have replaced printed newspapers. Concerning factors explaining digital news consumption among the 65+ group, general Internet habits, sex, and political interest are shown to be the most important.

Keywords

  • news consumption
  • older adults
  • representative survey
  • replacement
  • complementarity
Open Access

Online Surveillance in a Swedish Context: Between acceptance and resistance

Published Online: 18 Dec 2020
Page range: 179 - 193

Abstract

Abstract

Users of digital media leave traces that corporations and authorities can harvest, systematise, and analyse; on the societal level, an overall result is the emergence of a surveillance culture. In this study, we examine how people handle the dilemma of leaving digital footprints: what they say they do to protect their privacy and what could legitimise the collection and storing of their data. Through a survey of almost 1,000 students at Umeå University in Sweden, we find that most respondents know that their data are used and choose to adjust their own behaviour rather than adopting technical solutions. In order to understand contemporary forms of surveillance, we call for a humanistic approach – an approach where hermeneutic and qualitative methods are central.

Keywords

  • online surveillance
  • surveillance culture
  • soft surveillance
  • privacy paradox
  • digital humanities
Open Access

Book Reviews

Published Online: 18 Dec 2020
Page range: 195 - 202

Abstract

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