Issues

Journal & Issues

Volume 68 (2022): Issue 1 (March 2022)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 4 (December 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 3 (September 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 2 (June 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 1 (March 2021)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 4 (December 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 3 (September 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 2 (June 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 1 (March 2020)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 4 (December 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 3 (September 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 2 (June 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 1 (March 2019)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 4 (December 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 3 (September 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 2 (June 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 1 (March 2018)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 4 (December 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 3 (September 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 2 (June 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 1 (March 2017)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 4 (December 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 3 (September 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 2 (June 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 1 (March 2016)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 4 (December 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 3 (September 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 2 (June 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 1 (March 2015)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 4 (December 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 3 (September 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 2 (June 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 1 (March 2014)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 4 (December 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 3 (September 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 2 (June 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 1 (March 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2449-8343
First Published
04 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 4 (December 2017)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2449-8343
First Published
04 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles
Open Access

Cichorin A: a benzo-isochromene from Nypa fruticans endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp.

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 13 - 17

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Similar bioactive metabolites are obtainable from host plants as well as the endophytic fungi residing in them. Objective: The aim of the study is to isolate the major compound(s) from the endophytic fungus residing in Nypa fruticans Wurmb, Arecaceae family. Methods: Purification of the ethyl acetate extract of the isolated endophytic fungus was performed by employing different chromatographic techniques and structural elucidation of the isolated compound was carried out using UV and NMR spectroscopic methods. Results: Cichorin A was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the solid rice cultures of Pestalotiopsis sp., isolated from N. fruticans, collected in Nigeria. Conclusions: This compound is being isolated for the first time from a fungus; it is commonly isolated from the plant Cichorium intybus L. (Compositae).

Keywords

  • cichorin
  • Pestalotiopsis
  • endophytic fungus
  • bioactive compounds
  • Nypa fruticans
Open Access

Chemical compounds and antimicrobial activity of petitgrain (Citrus aurantium L. var. amara) essential oil

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 18 - 25

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Due to its low cost and easy availability on the market, the petitgrain oil is commonly used in food, cosmetics, and aromatherapy. Objective: The examination of chemical composition and antibacterial activity of commercial petitgrain oil. Methods: Identification of chemical components of the petitgrain oil was performed by gas chromatography (GC). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentrations (MBC/MFC) were determined using macrodilution method for the reference strains of bacteria and fungi. Results: Twenty components were identified. The petitgrain oil contained mostly oxygenated monoterpene hydrocarbons (98.01%), and the main components included linalyl acetate (48.06%) and linalool (26.88%). The MIC/MBC of the petitgrain oil for bacteria was in the range of 0.63-5.0/1.25-5.0 mg/ml and for fungi in the range of 1.25-40/5.0-80 mg/ml. Conclusion: The petitgrain oil had higher antibacterial activity than antifungal activity. Bacillus subtilis among the tested bacteria and Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum among the fungi were found to be highly inhibited by the petitgrain oil.

Keywords

  • petitgrain
  • essential oil
  • chemical composition
  • antimicrobial activity
Open Access

Genetic resources of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) as very rich source of α-linolenic acid

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 26 - 33

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Polish oilseed and flaxseed collection is a source of genotypes containing very high amounts of α-linolenic acid. Objective: The objective of the study is to test the seeds for the fat content and fatty acids composition in the oil pressed from the 9 tested accessions of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). Our goal is to promote the Polish flax collection, which seeds are unique as one of the richest sources of α-linolenic acid. Methods: Assays to determine the content of fat and fatty acids composition in linseed oil were performed at the IHAR-PIB Biochemical Laboratory in Poznań. The fat content was determined by infrared analysis (calibration performed on the basis of seed sample at IHAR-PIB in Poznań) by means of a NIRS 6500 spectrophotometer with a reflection detector within the range of 400-2500 nm. The composition of fatty acids was determined by means of a method proposed by Byczyńska and Krzymański (1969), based on gas chromatography of methyl esters of fatty acids contained in linseed oil. The following varieties of flax were investigated: Tabare (INF00111), Szegedi 30 (INF00427), Olin (INF 00444), Redwood 65 (INF00523), Dufferin (INF00540), AC Mc Duff (INF00648), Alfonso Inta (INF00683), Olinette (INF00687), Royale (INF00689). Results: The content of α-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3) in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 48.9 (Royale) to 59.9% (Alfonso Inta). Content of linoleic acid (LA, C18:2) in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 12.4 (Tabare) to 17.1% (AC Mc Duff). The content of oleic acid (OA, C18:1) of 9 accession of flax ranged from 17.1 (Alfonso Inta) to 26.7% (Royale). The content of stearic acid in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 2.3 (Alfonso Inta) to 5.0% (Tabare, Szegedi 30) and the content of palmitic acid ranged from 4.7 (Dufferin) to 6.0% (Olin). The content of fat ranged from 42.7 (Olin) to 52.0% (AC Mc Duff). The fatty acid ratio n-6/n-3 ranged from 0.23/1 (Tabare) to 0.32/1 (AC Mc Duff).

Keywords

  • flax
  • Linum usitatissimum
  • fatty acids
  • omega-3
  • flax seeds
Open Access

8-Prenylnaringenin from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) – a panacea for menopause?

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 34 - 44

Abstract

Summary

8-Prenylnaryngenin (8-PN) is the strongest known phytoestrogen (PE). Its main source is the female inflorescences of hops (Humulus lupulus L.). 8-PN, which, in contrast to other PEs, is proven to have stronger activity and higher affinity for the α subtype of estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, it may be an effective substitute for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The studies in postmenopausal women have shown its particular effectiveness in reducing hot flashes. However, a strong stimulation of uterus by 8-PN may be associated with the occurrence of adverse effects (eg. bleeding) and increase the risk of carcinogenesis. The H. lupulus extracts preparations are currently supplements which makes control of the doses used and thus increases the occurrence of uncontrolled self-treatment difficult. This paper presents the current knowledge on 8-PN and discusses the potential risks associated with use of hops to alleviate the symptoms of menopause.

Keywords

  • 8-prenylnaringenin
  • hop
  • phytoestrogens
  • menopause
  • hot flashes
  • dietary supplements
  • side effects
Open Access

Terminalia chebula Retz. – an important medicinal plant

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 45 - 56

Abstract

Summary

Ayurveda, whispered to be the ancient practice of healthcare existed and contributes a holistic approach to health, healing and longevity. Terminalia chebula Retz. is a popular plant and widely spread all over southern Asia. T. chebula is a native plant of India and its dried fruit is extensively used in various types of home remedies. Dried fruit of T. chebula contains high quantities phenolic compounds that consist of ellagic acid, gallic acid and chebulic acid. The fruit extract of T. chebula is known to display different biological properties like anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-protozoal, antimicrobial, hepato and renal protective activities, and in the management of metabolic syndrome. The phenolic active compounds might play vital role in the influence of biological activity. Fruit extract of T. chebula is widely employed as an important ingredient in various ayurvedic preparations like ‘Triphala’. This formulation is beneficial as detoxifying agent of the colon, purgative in chronic constipation, aids in digestion and as a body rejuvenator. The fruit has great medicinal significance and conventionally applied for the management of various illness conditions, such as sore throat, high cough, asthma, ulcers, gout, heart burn, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, bleeding piles and bladder diseases. It is also utilized as mild laxative, antispasmodic and stomachic. Because of these enormous medicinal properties, T. chebula is commonly termed as ‘King of Medicine’ in Tibet and can be called as a ‘wonder herb’. In the present review, recent advances in medicinal properties of T. chebula are discussed.

Keywords

  • Ayurveda
  • Terminalia chebula
  • dried fruit
  • phytochemicals
  • medicinal properties
Open Access

Occurrence of pathogenic and endophytic fungi and their influence on quality of medicinal plants applied in management of neurological diseases and mental disorders

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 57 - 69

Abstract

Summary

Due to increasing demand of medicinal plants (MPs), quality and safety more attention to the plant health should be paid. Among herb pathogens, especially fungi cause serious diseases in these plants decreasing yield and quality of herbal raw material. Some species, i.e. Fusarium sp., Alternaria sp., Penicillium sp. are known as mycotoxin producers. Paradoxically, self-treatment with herbal raw material can expose the patient to mycotoxin activity. In tissues of some MPs species, asymptomatically endophytic fungi residue. It is known that they are able to influence a biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in their host plant or produce biologically active compounds. Until recently these microorganisms have been neglected as a component of MPs, the reason why there have unexplored bioactivity and biodiversity. The paper presents an overview of herbal plants that are used in the treatment of nervous system diseases. Pathogenic fungi that infect these plants are described. It focused mainly on species producing harmful mycotoxins. The publication presents a list of these mycotoxins and a brief description of their effects on human health. The second part of this article provides information on the occurrence of endophytic fungi in herbal plants and their effects on human health. Coexistence of fungi and medicinal plants is not fully understood but can be crucial to ensure health and safety of patients with neurological diseases and mental disorders.

Keywords

  • herbal medicines
  • phytotherapy
  • medicinal plant diseases
  • pathogenic fungi of plants
  • mycotoxins
  • endophytes
  • neurological diseases
  • mental disorders
6 Articles
Open Access

Cichorin A: a benzo-isochromene from Nypa fruticans endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp.

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 13 - 17

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Similar bioactive metabolites are obtainable from host plants as well as the endophytic fungi residing in them. Objective: The aim of the study is to isolate the major compound(s) from the endophytic fungus residing in Nypa fruticans Wurmb, Arecaceae family. Methods: Purification of the ethyl acetate extract of the isolated endophytic fungus was performed by employing different chromatographic techniques and structural elucidation of the isolated compound was carried out using UV and NMR spectroscopic methods. Results: Cichorin A was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the solid rice cultures of Pestalotiopsis sp., isolated from N. fruticans, collected in Nigeria. Conclusions: This compound is being isolated for the first time from a fungus; it is commonly isolated from the plant Cichorium intybus L. (Compositae).

Keywords

  • cichorin
  • Pestalotiopsis
  • endophytic fungus
  • bioactive compounds
  • Nypa fruticans
Open Access

Chemical compounds and antimicrobial activity of petitgrain (Citrus aurantium L. var. amara) essential oil

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 18 - 25

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Due to its low cost and easy availability on the market, the petitgrain oil is commonly used in food, cosmetics, and aromatherapy. Objective: The examination of chemical composition and antibacterial activity of commercial petitgrain oil. Methods: Identification of chemical components of the petitgrain oil was performed by gas chromatography (GC). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentrations (MBC/MFC) were determined using macrodilution method for the reference strains of bacteria and fungi. Results: Twenty components were identified. The petitgrain oil contained mostly oxygenated monoterpene hydrocarbons (98.01%), and the main components included linalyl acetate (48.06%) and linalool (26.88%). The MIC/MBC of the petitgrain oil for bacteria was in the range of 0.63-5.0/1.25-5.0 mg/ml and for fungi in the range of 1.25-40/5.0-80 mg/ml. Conclusion: The petitgrain oil had higher antibacterial activity than antifungal activity. Bacillus subtilis among the tested bacteria and Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum among the fungi were found to be highly inhibited by the petitgrain oil.

Keywords

  • petitgrain
  • essential oil
  • chemical composition
  • antimicrobial activity
Open Access

Genetic resources of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) as very rich source of α-linolenic acid

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 26 - 33

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Polish oilseed and flaxseed collection is a source of genotypes containing very high amounts of α-linolenic acid. Objective: The objective of the study is to test the seeds for the fat content and fatty acids composition in the oil pressed from the 9 tested accessions of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). Our goal is to promote the Polish flax collection, which seeds are unique as one of the richest sources of α-linolenic acid. Methods: Assays to determine the content of fat and fatty acids composition in linseed oil were performed at the IHAR-PIB Biochemical Laboratory in Poznań. The fat content was determined by infrared analysis (calibration performed on the basis of seed sample at IHAR-PIB in Poznań) by means of a NIRS 6500 spectrophotometer with a reflection detector within the range of 400-2500 nm. The composition of fatty acids was determined by means of a method proposed by Byczyńska and Krzymański (1969), based on gas chromatography of methyl esters of fatty acids contained in linseed oil. The following varieties of flax were investigated: Tabare (INF00111), Szegedi 30 (INF00427), Olin (INF 00444), Redwood 65 (INF00523), Dufferin (INF00540), AC Mc Duff (INF00648), Alfonso Inta (INF00683), Olinette (INF00687), Royale (INF00689). Results: The content of α-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3) in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 48.9 (Royale) to 59.9% (Alfonso Inta). Content of linoleic acid (LA, C18:2) in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 12.4 (Tabare) to 17.1% (AC Mc Duff). The content of oleic acid (OA, C18:1) of 9 accession of flax ranged from 17.1 (Alfonso Inta) to 26.7% (Royale). The content of stearic acid in evaluated genotypes of flax ranged from 2.3 (Alfonso Inta) to 5.0% (Tabare, Szegedi 30) and the content of palmitic acid ranged from 4.7 (Dufferin) to 6.0% (Olin). The content of fat ranged from 42.7 (Olin) to 52.0% (AC Mc Duff). The fatty acid ratio n-6/n-3 ranged from 0.23/1 (Tabare) to 0.32/1 (AC Mc Duff).

Keywords

  • flax
  • Linum usitatissimum
  • fatty acids
  • omega-3
  • flax seeds
Open Access

8-Prenylnaringenin from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) – a panacea for menopause?

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 34 - 44

Abstract

Summary

8-Prenylnaryngenin (8-PN) is the strongest known phytoestrogen (PE). Its main source is the female inflorescences of hops (Humulus lupulus L.). 8-PN, which, in contrast to other PEs, is proven to have stronger activity and higher affinity for the α subtype of estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, it may be an effective substitute for hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The studies in postmenopausal women have shown its particular effectiveness in reducing hot flashes. However, a strong stimulation of uterus by 8-PN may be associated with the occurrence of adverse effects (eg. bleeding) and increase the risk of carcinogenesis. The H. lupulus extracts preparations are currently supplements which makes control of the doses used and thus increases the occurrence of uncontrolled self-treatment difficult. This paper presents the current knowledge on 8-PN and discusses the potential risks associated with use of hops to alleviate the symptoms of menopause.

Keywords

  • 8-prenylnaringenin
  • hop
  • phytoestrogens
  • menopause
  • hot flashes
  • dietary supplements
  • side effects
Open Access

Terminalia chebula Retz. – an important medicinal plant

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 45 - 56

Abstract

Summary

Ayurveda, whispered to be the ancient practice of healthcare existed and contributes a holistic approach to health, healing and longevity. Terminalia chebula Retz. is a popular plant and widely spread all over southern Asia. T. chebula is a native plant of India and its dried fruit is extensively used in various types of home remedies. Dried fruit of T. chebula contains high quantities phenolic compounds that consist of ellagic acid, gallic acid and chebulic acid. The fruit extract of T. chebula is known to display different biological properties like anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-protozoal, antimicrobial, hepato and renal protective activities, and in the management of metabolic syndrome. The phenolic active compounds might play vital role in the influence of biological activity. Fruit extract of T. chebula is widely employed as an important ingredient in various ayurvedic preparations like ‘Triphala’. This formulation is beneficial as detoxifying agent of the colon, purgative in chronic constipation, aids in digestion and as a body rejuvenator. The fruit has great medicinal significance and conventionally applied for the management of various illness conditions, such as sore throat, high cough, asthma, ulcers, gout, heart burn, vomiting, diarrhea, dysentery, bleeding piles and bladder diseases. It is also utilized as mild laxative, antispasmodic and stomachic. Because of these enormous medicinal properties, T. chebula is commonly termed as ‘King of Medicine’ in Tibet and can be called as a ‘wonder herb’. In the present review, recent advances in medicinal properties of T. chebula are discussed.

Keywords

  • Ayurveda
  • Terminalia chebula
  • dried fruit
  • phytochemicals
  • medicinal properties
Open Access

Occurrence of pathogenic and endophytic fungi and their influence on quality of medicinal plants applied in management of neurological diseases and mental disorders

Published Online: 06 Mar 2018
Page range: 57 - 69

Abstract

Summary

Due to increasing demand of medicinal plants (MPs), quality and safety more attention to the plant health should be paid. Among herb pathogens, especially fungi cause serious diseases in these plants decreasing yield and quality of herbal raw material. Some species, i.e. Fusarium sp., Alternaria sp., Penicillium sp. are known as mycotoxin producers. Paradoxically, self-treatment with herbal raw material can expose the patient to mycotoxin activity. In tissues of some MPs species, asymptomatically endophytic fungi residue. It is known that they are able to influence a biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in their host plant or produce biologically active compounds. Until recently these microorganisms have been neglected as a component of MPs, the reason why there have unexplored bioactivity and biodiversity. The paper presents an overview of herbal plants that are used in the treatment of nervous system diseases. Pathogenic fungi that infect these plants are described. It focused mainly on species producing harmful mycotoxins. The publication presents a list of these mycotoxins and a brief description of their effects on human health. The second part of this article provides information on the occurrence of endophytic fungi in herbal plants and their effects on human health. Coexistence of fungi and medicinal plants is not fully understood but can be crucial to ensure health and safety of patients with neurological diseases and mental disorders.

Keywords

  • herbal medicines
  • phytotherapy
  • medicinal plant diseases
  • pathogenic fungi of plants
  • mycotoxins
  • endophytes
  • neurological diseases
  • mental disorders

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo