Issues

Journal & Issues

Volume 68 (2022): Issue 2 (June 2022)

Volume 68 (2022): Issue 1 (March 2022)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 4 (December 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 3 (September 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 2 (June 2021)

Volume 67 (2021): Issue 1 (March 2021)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 4 (December 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 3 (September 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 2 (June 2020)

Volume 66 (2020): Issue 1 (March 2020)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 4 (December 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 3 (September 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 2 (June 2019)

Volume 65 (2019): Issue 1 (March 2019)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 4 (December 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 3 (September 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 2 (June 2018)

Volume 64 (2018): Issue 1 (March 2018)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 4 (December 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 3 (September 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 2 (June 2017)

Volume 63 (2017): Issue 1 (March 2017)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 4 (December 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 3 (September 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 2 (June 2016)

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 1 (March 2016)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 4 (December 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 3 (September 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 2 (June 2015)

Volume 61 (2015): Issue 1 (March 2015)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 4 (December 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 3 (September 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 2 (June 2014)

Volume 60 (2014): Issue 1 (March 2014)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 4 (December 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 3 (September 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 2 (June 2013)

Volume 59 (2013): Issue 1 (March 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2449-8343
First Published
04 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

Volume 62 (2016): Issue 2 (June 2016)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
2449-8343
First Published
04 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English

Search

6 Articles
Open Access

Accumulation of phenolic compounds in the purple betony herb (Stachys officinalis L.) originated from cultivation

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 7 - 16

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Purple betony (Stachys officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is a perennial of versatile medicinal usage. Nowadays, in Poland betony herb is collected exclusively from wild growing plants. Decreasing number of its natural sites results in lack of the herb supply and thus, in its limited usage.

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effects of the age of plant and term of raw material harvest on its yield and quality in cultivation conditions.

Methods: The observations were carried out on 2- and 3-year-old plants. During vegetation the herb was collected for four times. The raw material was subjected to chemical analysis. Tannins (as pyrogallol equivalent) were determined according to Polish Pharmacopoeia, phenolic acids and flavonoids – by HPLC.

Results: The mass of herb, both in the second and third year, had increased from the beginning of vegetation up to seed setting. The highest content of tannins was found in the herb collected at the vegetative stage of plant development (2.05% in the second and 2.91% in the third year). Four phenolic acids (chlorogenic, ferulic, caffeic and rosmarinic acids) and five flavonoid compounds (orientin, luteolin-7-glucoside, apigenin-7-glucoside, apigenin-3-glucoside, apigenin) were identified in the obtained raw materials. In these groups, the dominant compounds were caffeic acid and apigenin. The highest content of caffeic acid was found at the beginning of plant vegetation, whereas apigenin – at the stage of full blooming and seed setting.

Conclusion: In cultivation conditions, purple betony produces high mass of herb which may be used as a valuable raw material in herbal industry.

Keywords

  • accumulation of biomass
  • tannins
  • phenolic acids
  • flavonoids
Open Access

The effect of soil type and soil additives on the selected growth parameters and yield of flowerheads of Calendula officinalis L.

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 17 - 30

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Soil additives, which usually contain nutrients and microorganism, can improve soil conditions for plants. There are still few papers dedicated to the application of soil additives in herb plants, especially in calendula.

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of selected soil additives on growth and yield of calendula.

Methods: In a pot experiment first order factor was a type of soil: mineral soil with straw, mineral soil and organic soil. The second order factor was soil additive: control, UG Max, EM1 and PRP SOL.

Results: The application of UG Max and PRP SOL increased the yield of dry matter of flowerheads by respectively 48.1% and 46.3% in comparison with the control group.

Conclusions: UG Max and PRP SOL proved to be the most useful soil additive for calendula growing. The effect of UG Max and PRP SOL was particularly good on organic soil.

Keywords

  • calendula
  • UG Max
  • EM1
  • PRP SOL
  • mineral soil
  • organic soil
Open Access

Influence of storage and pre-sowing treatment of southern sweet-grass seeds on their germination and initial growth of seedlings

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 31 - 41

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Southern sweet-grass (Hierochloë australis /Schrad./ Roem. et Schult., Poaceae) is a perennial tuft-grass occurring in North-Eastern part of Europe. Its leaves are collected from wild growing plants as an aromatic raw material used in alcohol industry. Due to overharvest, attempts to introduce the plant into cultivation have been undertaken.

Objective: This work aims to assess the influence of southern sweet-grass seeds (spikelets) storage and pre-sowing treatment on their germination and the initial growth of seedlings.

Methods: The seeds were assessed directly after harvest and after 6, 18 and 30 months of storage. The investigated parameters, i.e. 1000 seed weight, moisture content, germinability and viability of seeds (tetrazoline test) were determined according to ISTA.

Results: After 30 months of storage, the germinability of seeds decreased from 42.6 (after harvest) to 4.6% but their viability remained high (70.9%). Stratification, short rinse of stratified seed in H2SO4 and application of KNO3 or GA3 had increased the seeds germination (over 70%).

Conclusion: Southern sweet-grass seeds become dormant shortly after maturing. The improvement of germination requires the application of combined treatments, i.e. stratification, scarification and growth-promoting substances.

Keywords

  • Hierochloë australis
  • spikelets
  • stratification
  • scarification
  • growth-promoting substances
Open Access

Statistical analysis of the associations between phenolic monoterpenes and molecular markers, AFLPs and SAMPLs in the spice plant Oregano

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 42 - 56

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Molecular markers are the examples of the contribution of genome technology to medicinal plant breeding through marker-assisted selection (MAS) for pharmaceutical quality.

Objective: Forty-two accessions of Origanum vulgare L. originating from Europe were evaluated to detect genomic and chemotypic polymorphisms and to discover possible associations between them.

Methods: A total of 477 molecular polymorphisms including 214 AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) and 263 SAMPL (Selectively Amplified Microsatellite Polymorphic Loci) were used for genotyping. Components in the essential oils were identified and quantified by gas chromatography (GC) and two major compounds (two economically important monoterpenes: carvacrol and thymol) were investigated.

Results: Based on results, a relatively high correlation between chemotypic patterns and genetic markers was identified. Associations between traits of interest for essential oils (carvacrol and thymol content) and genetic markers were tested using five statistical methods including three General Linear Model (GLM) and two unified Mixed Linear Model (MLM) approaches. Significant associations were found for 3 AFLP and 20 SAMPL with three key traits including essential oil yield, carvacrol and thymol content.

Conclusion: These associations can constitute a useful starting point for marker-assisted selection. Therefore, the results provide the basis for molecular breeding of O. vulgare for pharmaceutical purposes.

Keywords

  • Origanum vulgare
  • essential oils
  • AFLP
  • SAMPL
  • marker-trait associations
Open Access

Antibacterial activity of Tribulus terrestris methanol extract against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 57 - 66

Abstract

Summary

Introduction:Tribulus terrestris L. is traditionally used for treatment of urinary tract infections. Escherichia coli, as the most prominent agent of urinary tract infections, can be sensitive to T. terrestris extract.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of T. terrestris methanol extract against clinical isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections. Saponins were determined as main constituents of T. terrestris methanol extract.

Methods: The antibacterial activities of T. terrestris methanol extract were evaluated by micro-broth dilution assay. The synergistic effects of T. terrestris methanol extract were screened with gentamicin by micro titer plate and disc diffusion assays. The isobologram curve was figured and the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) was determined.

Results: The saponin content of T. terrestris methanol extract was 54% (w/w). The means of MIC and MBC values for E. coli clinical isolates (n=51) were 3.5±0.27 and 7.4±0.5 mg/ml while these amounts were 3.9±1.3 and 6.4±1.8 μg/ml for gentamicin. T. terrestris methanol extract and gentamicin had synergistic effect with FICI equal to 0.1375.

Conclusion: Therefore, T. terrestris can be applicable as alternative treatment in management of urinary tract infections.

Keywords

  • Tribulus terrestris
  • methanol extract
  • synergy
  • gentamicin
  • saponins
Open Access

In vitro antimicrobial activity of extracts and their fractions from three Eryngium L. species

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 67 - 77

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Due to increasing resistance against antibiotics and antifungal agents, crude plant extracts, fractions, and isolated pure compounds became a new interest as antimicrobial agents.

Objectives: The antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts and fractions of Eryngium planum L., E. campestre L., and E. maritimum L. was evaluated against selected bacteria, yeast and mould, and compared in tested Eryngium species and in their organs.

Methods: The antimicrobial activity was studied with use of broth microdilution method. The antibacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger) activity of selected extracts and fractions compared with the reference substance was expressed by Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimal Bactericidal/Fungicidal Concentration (MBC/MFC). The extract and fraction compounds were identified on the basis of TLC examination.

Results: The saponin-phenolic acid fractions of E. maritimum and E. planum and a saponin fraction of E. planum showed the highest activity against S. aureus (MIC = 1–2.5 mg·ml−1). The growth of C. albicans was inhibited by methanolic extract of E. planum cell suspension culture (MIC = 7.8 mg·ml−1).

Conclusion: The antimicrobial activity depends on the Eryngium species, tested biomass, and microorganism.

Keywords

  • Eryngium planum
  • E. campestre
  • E. maritimum
  • antibacterial activity
  • antifungal activity
6 Articles
Open Access

Accumulation of phenolic compounds in the purple betony herb (Stachys officinalis L.) originated from cultivation

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 7 - 16

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Purple betony (Stachys officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is a perennial of versatile medicinal usage. Nowadays, in Poland betony herb is collected exclusively from wild growing plants. Decreasing number of its natural sites results in lack of the herb supply and thus, in its limited usage.

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effects of the age of plant and term of raw material harvest on its yield and quality in cultivation conditions.

Methods: The observations were carried out on 2- and 3-year-old plants. During vegetation the herb was collected for four times. The raw material was subjected to chemical analysis. Tannins (as pyrogallol equivalent) were determined according to Polish Pharmacopoeia, phenolic acids and flavonoids – by HPLC.

Results: The mass of herb, both in the second and third year, had increased from the beginning of vegetation up to seed setting. The highest content of tannins was found in the herb collected at the vegetative stage of plant development (2.05% in the second and 2.91% in the third year). Four phenolic acids (chlorogenic, ferulic, caffeic and rosmarinic acids) and five flavonoid compounds (orientin, luteolin-7-glucoside, apigenin-7-glucoside, apigenin-3-glucoside, apigenin) were identified in the obtained raw materials. In these groups, the dominant compounds were caffeic acid and apigenin. The highest content of caffeic acid was found at the beginning of plant vegetation, whereas apigenin – at the stage of full blooming and seed setting.

Conclusion: In cultivation conditions, purple betony produces high mass of herb which may be used as a valuable raw material in herbal industry.

Keywords

  • accumulation of biomass
  • tannins
  • phenolic acids
  • flavonoids
Open Access

The effect of soil type and soil additives on the selected growth parameters and yield of flowerheads of Calendula officinalis L.

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 17 - 30

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Soil additives, which usually contain nutrients and microorganism, can improve soil conditions for plants. There are still few papers dedicated to the application of soil additives in herb plants, especially in calendula.

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of selected soil additives on growth and yield of calendula.

Methods: In a pot experiment first order factor was a type of soil: mineral soil with straw, mineral soil and organic soil. The second order factor was soil additive: control, UG Max, EM1 and PRP SOL.

Results: The application of UG Max and PRP SOL increased the yield of dry matter of flowerheads by respectively 48.1% and 46.3% in comparison with the control group.

Conclusions: UG Max and PRP SOL proved to be the most useful soil additive for calendula growing. The effect of UG Max and PRP SOL was particularly good on organic soil.

Keywords

  • calendula
  • UG Max
  • EM1
  • PRP SOL
  • mineral soil
  • organic soil
Open Access

Influence of storage and pre-sowing treatment of southern sweet-grass seeds on their germination and initial growth of seedlings

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 31 - 41

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Southern sweet-grass (Hierochloë australis /Schrad./ Roem. et Schult., Poaceae) is a perennial tuft-grass occurring in North-Eastern part of Europe. Its leaves are collected from wild growing plants as an aromatic raw material used in alcohol industry. Due to overharvest, attempts to introduce the plant into cultivation have been undertaken.

Objective: This work aims to assess the influence of southern sweet-grass seeds (spikelets) storage and pre-sowing treatment on their germination and the initial growth of seedlings.

Methods: The seeds were assessed directly after harvest and after 6, 18 and 30 months of storage. The investigated parameters, i.e. 1000 seed weight, moisture content, germinability and viability of seeds (tetrazoline test) were determined according to ISTA.

Results: After 30 months of storage, the germinability of seeds decreased from 42.6 (after harvest) to 4.6% but their viability remained high (70.9%). Stratification, short rinse of stratified seed in H2SO4 and application of KNO3 or GA3 had increased the seeds germination (over 70%).

Conclusion: Southern sweet-grass seeds become dormant shortly after maturing. The improvement of germination requires the application of combined treatments, i.e. stratification, scarification and growth-promoting substances.

Keywords

  • Hierochloë australis
  • spikelets
  • stratification
  • scarification
  • growth-promoting substances
Open Access

Statistical analysis of the associations between phenolic monoterpenes and molecular markers, AFLPs and SAMPLs in the spice plant Oregano

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 42 - 56

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Molecular markers are the examples of the contribution of genome technology to medicinal plant breeding through marker-assisted selection (MAS) for pharmaceutical quality.

Objective: Forty-two accessions of Origanum vulgare L. originating from Europe were evaluated to detect genomic and chemotypic polymorphisms and to discover possible associations between them.

Methods: A total of 477 molecular polymorphisms including 214 AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) and 263 SAMPL (Selectively Amplified Microsatellite Polymorphic Loci) were used for genotyping. Components in the essential oils were identified and quantified by gas chromatography (GC) and two major compounds (two economically important monoterpenes: carvacrol and thymol) were investigated.

Results: Based on results, a relatively high correlation between chemotypic patterns and genetic markers was identified. Associations between traits of interest for essential oils (carvacrol and thymol content) and genetic markers were tested using five statistical methods including three General Linear Model (GLM) and two unified Mixed Linear Model (MLM) approaches. Significant associations were found for 3 AFLP and 20 SAMPL with three key traits including essential oil yield, carvacrol and thymol content.

Conclusion: These associations can constitute a useful starting point for marker-assisted selection. Therefore, the results provide the basis for molecular breeding of O. vulgare for pharmaceutical purposes.

Keywords

  • Origanum vulgare
  • essential oils
  • AFLP
  • SAMPL
  • marker-trait associations
Open Access

Antibacterial activity of Tribulus terrestris methanol extract against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 57 - 66

Abstract

Summary

Introduction:Tribulus terrestris L. is traditionally used for treatment of urinary tract infections. Escherichia coli, as the most prominent agent of urinary tract infections, can be sensitive to T. terrestris extract.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of T. terrestris methanol extract against clinical isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections. Saponins were determined as main constituents of T. terrestris methanol extract.

Methods: The antibacterial activities of T. terrestris methanol extract were evaluated by micro-broth dilution assay. The synergistic effects of T. terrestris methanol extract were screened with gentamicin by micro titer plate and disc diffusion assays. The isobologram curve was figured and the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) was determined.

Results: The saponin content of T. terrestris methanol extract was 54% (w/w). The means of MIC and MBC values for E. coli clinical isolates (n=51) were 3.5±0.27 and 7.4±0.5 mg/ml while these amounts were 3.9±1.3 and 6.4±1.8 μg/ml for gentamicin. T. terrestris methanol extract and gentamicin had synergistic effect with FICI equal to 0.1375.

Conclusion: Therefore, T. terrestris can be applicable as alternative treatment in management of urinary tract infections.

Keywords

  • Tribulus terrestris
  • methanol extract
  • synergy
  • gentamicin
  • saponins
Open Access

In vitro antimicrobial activity of extracts and their fractions from three Eryngium L. species

Published Online: 07 Jul 2016
Page range: 67 - 77

Abstract

Summary

Introduction: Due to increasing resistance against antibiotics and antifungal agents, crude plant extracts, fractions, and isolated pure compounds became a new interest as antimicrobial agents.

Objectives: The antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts and fractions of Eryngium planum L., E. campestre L., and E. maritimum L. was evaluated against selected bacteria, yeast and mould, and compared in tested Eryngium species and in their organs.

Methods: The antimicrobial activity was studied with use of broth microdilution method. The antibacterial (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger) activity of selected extracts and fractions compared with the reference substance was expressed by Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimal Bactericidal/Fungicidal Concentration (MBC/MFC). The extract and fraction compounds were identified on the basis of TLC examination.

Results: The saponin-phenolic acid fractions of E. maritimum and E. planum and a saponin fraction of E. planum showed the highest activity against S. aureus (MIC = 1–2.5 mg·ml−1). The growth of C. albicans was inhibited by methanolic extract of E. planum cell suspension culture (MIC = 7.8 mg·ml−1).

Conclusion: The antimicrobial activity depends on the Eryngium species, tested biomass, and microorganism.

Keywords

  • Eryngium planum
  • E. campestre
  • E. maritimum
  • antibacterial activity
  • antifungal activity

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo