Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Governance options of municipal actors for reurbanisation in medium-sized cities. An analysis by the example of Bamberg

Published Online: 27 Sep 2020
Page range: 521 - 535

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the governance options for reurbanisation in medium-sized cities by using the example of Bamberg. The key questions are: Which planning approaches are developed in the areas of action housing and urban development to shape reurbanisation? How do local actor constellations and relationships shape the governance options? The contribution follows on debates about local reurbanisation drivers and an understanding of planning in terms of governance. The results show that Bamberg aimed to develop a conversion area and has thus implemented planning instruments and political-administrative structures. However, the use of the conversion areas by non-municipal actors in addition with municipal actors that are strongly guided by monetary considerations prevents the conversion in the further course and severely limits the governance options. As a result, a departure from the goal of a planned reurbanisation can be seen. The paper concludes by discussing the context under which growth policies for reurbanisation are developed and implemented.

Keywords

  • Reurbanisation
  • Medium-sized cities
  • Bamberg
  • Governance
  • Urban development
Open Access

Functional classification of small towns in Germany. A methodological comparison

Published Online: 06 Nov 2020
Page range: 537 - 557

Abstract

Abstract

The development of small towns in Germany in terms of their economic, demographic and social endowment is a subject area that has been rather neglected so far. What is more, research often focuses exclusively on small towns in rural and peripheral regions, because this is the only place where they are assigned a certain role. Small towns in central areas, on the other hand, are subsumed under suburbia in research and are thus rarely considered in terms of their specific functions. In this paper, all small towns in Germany are classified with regard to important functions. The typification is done by means of a cluster analysis based on central factors, which in turn are tied to a broad set of indicators. Reference points are the classical method of principal component analysis and, as an alternative method, to geographically weighted principal component analysis. The methodological comparison shows that the alternative method – also due to the high computational effort – is not yet a suitable method for describing spatial relationships between the variables and for small towns with regard to existing functions in their surrounding areas. On the other hand, the approach of the principal component analysis, cluster analysis and discriminant analysis, which is found in the literature, produces well defined and explainable solutions for the formation of different types of small towns in Germany.

Keywords

  • Small town
  • Functional classification
  • Geographically weighted principal component analysis
  • Principal component analysis
  • Cluster analysis
Open Access

The myth of responsiveness. Discourse analysis on the indirect effectiveness of building orders and planning-law expropriations

Published Online: 06 Nov 2020
Page range: 559 - 573

Abstract

Abstract

Building orders and planning-law expropriations are viewed as particularly interventionist instruments of the Federal Building Code. The two instruments share another characteristic in addition to this high degree of interventionism, namely that they are rarely used in practice. This is due to the theory of responsive land policy, which suggests that less interventionist instruments should be applied first. However, these latter instruments are effective because all those involved, and particularly the affected parties, are aware of the existence of the more intensive options. Municipal decision-making instances thus profit from the provision of building orders and, in particular, expropriation as the ‘ultima ratio’ of planning law. The responsive approach is nonetheless only possible when those affected are aware of, or are made aware of, the existence of the more interventionist instruments. This article presents the results of a discourse analysis of 300 newspapers from the past 25 years. The analysis investigates the hypothesis that the decision-making instances mention building orders and expropriation in these media so as to exercise indirect influence in advance, and thus attempt to persuade those involved to cooperate. The analysis shows that the municipalities also use the local media to consider the use of building orders and expropriation. Often the actual application of the instruments is relativised in the same article by other decisions (for instance by the opposition), independent experts or editorial comments.

Keywords

  • Housing Policy
  • Responsive land policy
  • Building order
  • Urban expropriation
  • Discourse analysis
  • Planning law
Open Access

Doubly relevant: Critical infrastructures of

Published Online: 16 Dec 2020
Page range: 575 - 593

Abstract

Abstract

Spatial planning is called on to contribute to managing risks associated with outages of infrastructure services deemed particularly important in the context of critical infrastructure protection. This paper explores indications of overlaps between critical infrastructure sectors and the fields of Daseinsvorsorge (services of general interests) which have not yet received much attention in expert discussions. It provides a comparison of critical infrastructure sectors and variants of lists of the fields of Daseinsvorsorge. Although the extent of the overlaps cannot be determined exactly, it can be assumed that most of the infrastructures considered tobe critical are involved in the provision of services associated with the concept of Daseinsvorsorge. Hence the infrastructures and services in question are subject to different policy areas and interventions carried out in accordance with them. This inference calls for consideration of the implications of the spatial organization of the provision of Daseinsvorsorge services for critical infrastructure protection. A change of perspective, i.e. looking at the aims and means of Daseinsvorsorge planning from the point of view of critical infrastructure protection, enhances the visibility of their potential ‘side effects’. As the concept of critical infrastructure incorporates both worthiness of protection and a certain hazard potential, a change of perspective leads to unfamiliar perceptions of the spatial planning of Daseinsvorsorge and raises academic and practical questions.

Keywords

  • Services of general interest
  • Germany
  • Critical infrastructure
  • Spatial planning
  • Risk management
Open Access

Labour Supply and Regional Labour Market Situation

Published Online: 22 Dec 2020
Page range: 595 - 613

Abstract

Abstract

Germany is particularly affected by demographic change. Therefore, increasing labour market participation is considered an important labour market policy objective because it can counteract shortages of labour supply due to the aging population. The scope for increasing labour force participation is not limited to certain groups of people. It also has a spatial dimension. This paper therefore analyses the regional differences in the labour market participation of men and women of different age groups at the level of German district regions. In particular, we examine regional imbalances in the regional variation of labour force participation. Further relations to regional variables are examined using multiple regressions. The results of the analysis could be interpreted according to the so-called discouragement hypothesis which suggests that unfavourable regional labour market conditions have a negative impact on regional labour force participation. For the regional wage level, only a minimal, mostly positive correlation with the labour force participation can be established, which can be interpreted by the mutually compensating effects of wages. The regional qualification level shows a positive correlation with the participation of middle-aged and older people in the labour market. Finally, further evidence highlights the importance of full-time childcare facilities for the labour force participation of women and, increasingly, men.

Keywords

  • Labour supply
  • Labour force participation
  • Labour force participation rate
  • Census 2011
  • German district regions

Rezension / Book review

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Governance options of municipal actors for reurbanisation in medium-sized cities. An analysis by the example of Bamberg

Published Online: 27 Sep 2020
Page range: 521 - 535

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the governance options for reurbanisation in medium-sized cities by using the example of Bamberg. The key questions are: Which planning approaches are developed in the areas of action housing and urban development to shape reurbanisation? How do local actor constellations and relationships shape the governance options? The contribution follows on debates about local reurbanisation drivers and an understanding of planning in terms of governance. The results show that Bamberg aimed to develop a conversion area and has thus implemented planning instruments and political-administrative structures. However, the use of the conversion areas by non-municipal actors in addition with municipal actors that are strongly guided by monetary considerations prevents the conversion in the further course and severely limits the governance options. As a result, a departure from the goal of a planned reurbanisation can be seen. The paper concludes by discussing the context under which growth policies for reurbanisation are developed and implemented.

Keywords

  • Reurbanisation
  • Medium-sized cities
  • Bamberg
  • Governance
  • Urban development
Open Access

Functional classification of small towns in Germany. A methodological comparison

Published Online: 06 Nov 2020
Page range: 537 - 557

Abstract

Abstract

The development of small towns in Germany in terms of their economic, demographic and social endowment is a subject area that has been rather neglected so far. What is more, research often focuses exclusively on small towns in rural and peripheral regions, because this is the only place where they are assigned a certain role. Small towns in central areas, on the other hand, are subsumed under suburbia in research and are thus rarely considered in terms of their specific functions. In this paper, all small towns in Germany are classified with regard to important functions. The typification is done by means of a cluster analysis based on central factors, which in turn are tied to a broad set of indicators. Reference points are the classical method of principal component analysis and, as an alternative method, to geographically weighted principal component analysis. The methodological comparison shows that the alternative method – also due to the high computational effort – is not yet a suitable method for describing spatial relationships between the variables and for small towns with regard to existing functions in their surrounding areas. On the other hand, the approach of the principal component analysis, cluster analysis and discriminant analysis, which is found in the literature, produces well defined and explainable solutions for the formation of different types of small towns in Germany.

Keywords

  • Small town
  • Functional classification
  • Geographically weighted principal component analysis
  • Principal component analysis
  • Cluster analysis
Open Access

The myth of responsiveness. Discourse analysis on the indirect effectiveness of building orders and planning-law expropriations

Published Online: 06 Nov 2020
Page range: 559 - 573

Abstract

Abstract

Building orders and planning-law expropriations are viewed as particularly interventionist instruments of the Federal Building Code. The two instruments share another characteristic in addition to this high degree of interventionism, namely that they are rarely used in practice. This is due to the theory of responsive land policy, which suggests that less interventionist instruments should be applied first. However, these latter instruments are effective because all those involved, and particularly the affected parties, are aware of the existence of the more intensive options. Municipal decision-making instances thus profit from the provision of building orders and, in particular, expropriation as the ‘ultima ratio’ of planning law. The responsive approach is nonetheless only possible when those affected are aware of, or are made aware of, the existence of the more interventionist instruments. This article presents the results of a discourse analysis of 300 newspapers from the past 25 years. The analysis investigates the hypothesis that the decision-making instances mention building orders and expropriation in these media so as to exercise indirect influence in advance, and thus attempt to persuade those involved to cooperate. The analysis shows that the municipalities also use the local media to consider the use of building orders and expropriation. Often the actual application of the instruments is relativised in the same article by other decisions (for instance by the opposition), independent experts or editorial comments.

Keywords

  • Housing Policy
  • Responsive land policy
  • Building order
  • Urban expropriation
  • Discourse analysis
  • Planning law
Open Access

Doubly relevant: Critical infrastructures of

Published Online: 16 Dec 2020
Page range: 575 - 593

Abstract

Abstract

Spatial planning is called on to contribute to managing risks associated with outages of infrastructure services deemed particularly important in the context of critical infrastructure protection. This paper explores indications of overlaps between critical infrastructure sectors and the fields of Daseinsvorsorge (services of general interests) which have not yet received much attention in expert discussions. It provides a comparison of critical infrastructure sectors and variants of lists of the fields of Daseinsvorsorge. Although the extent of the overlaps cannot be determined exactly, it can be assumed that most of the infrastructures considered tobe critical are involved in the provision of services associated with the concept of Daseinsvorsorge. Hence the infrastructures and services in question are subject to different policy areas and interventions carried out in accordance with them. This inference calls for consideration of the implications of the spatial organization of the provision of Daseinsvorsorge services for critical infrastructure protection. A change of perspective, i.e. looking at the aims and means of Daseinsvorsorge planning from the point of view of critical infrastructure protection, enhances the visibility of their potential ‘side effects’. As the concept of critical infrastructure incorporates both worthiness of protection and a certain hazard potential, a change of perspective leads to unfamiliar perceptions of the spatial planning of Daseinsvorsorge and raises academic and practical questions.

Keywords

  • Services of general interest
  • Germany
  • Critical infrastructure
  • Spatial planning
  • Risk management
Open Access

Labour Supply and Regional Labour Market Situation

Published Online: 22 Dec 2020
Page range: 595 - 613

Abstract

Abstract

Germany is particularly affected by demographic change. Therefore, increasing labour market participation is considered an important labour market policy objective because it can counteract shortages of labour supply due to the aging population. The scope for increasing labour force participation is not limited to certain groups of people. It also has a spatial dimension. This paper therefore analyses the regional differences in the labour market participation of men and women of different age groups at the level of German district regions. In particular, we examine regional imbalances in the regional variation of labour force participation. Further relations to regional variables are examined using multiple regressions. The results of the analysis could be interpreted according to the so-called discouragement hypothesis which suggests that unfavourable regional labour market conditions have a negative impact on regional labour force participation. For the regional wage level, only a minimal, mostly positive correlation with the labour force participation can be established, which can be interpreted by the mutually compensating effects of wages. The regional qualification level shows a positive correlation with the participation of middle-aged and older people in the labour market. Finally, further evidence highlights the importance of full-time childcare facilities for the labour force participation of women and, increasingly, men.

Keywords

  • Labour supply
  • Labour force participation
  • Labour force participation rate
  • Census 2011
  • German district regions

Rezension / Book review

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