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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

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Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

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Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

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Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

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Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

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Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

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Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

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Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

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Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Hybrid forms of urban production through digitalisation? Trends and cases from North Rhine-Westphalia

Published Online: 10 Apr 2020
Page range: 321 - 336

Abstract

Abstract

Building on current debates on digitalisation and spatial development processes, this paper aims to explore to what extent digitally enhanced production technologies, such as Industry 4.0, enable the emergence of new forms of urban production. Based on theoretical and conceptual considerations, empirical insights are derived from 41 interviews conducted with experts in eight industrial cities in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The results indicate that the commercial application of new digital production technologies instigates novel forms of hybrid digital urban manufacturing which change patterns of previous value creation. The paper develops a more precise understanding of these value creation processes and the locational embeddedness of hybrid digital urban manufacturing.

Keywords

  • Urban production
  • Digital transformation
  • Hybrid production
  • Problem-solving cycle
  • North Rhine-Westphalia
access type Open Access

The regional significance of university locations in Lower Saxony

Published Online: 05 May 2020
Page range: 337 - 359

Abstract

Abstract

Universities are important economic actors and make a considerable impact on the demand and supply side of their local economies. The aim of this paper is to quantify, compare and classify the different economic demand-and supply-side contributions of the university locations within Lower Saxony (Germany) using a combination of multiplier analysis and spatial econometrics on a NUTS 3 level. In comparison to numerous other studies, this paper does not focus on the economic impact of individual cases or a selected university location but gives a complete picture of the importance and significance of all university locations within Lower Saxony. The income-induced direct and indirect demand effects are estimated using a rich data set of higher education statistics in combination with an income and employment multiplier derived from a regional input-output table. The supply-side effects, i.e. the impact of the education and research outcomes, are estimated with the help of spatial panel regressions, a model derived from human capital theory and knowledge spillover theory. The estimation results give a complete and reproducible impression of the importance and significance of the different university locations, offering the opportunity for comparisons and classifications.

Keywords

  • Demand- and supply-side effects
  • multiplier analysis
  • spatial panel model
  • university locations
  • Lower Saxony
access type Open Access

Between co-creation and daily routine: challenges of volunteering people for (re) vitalizing their small town in Eastern Germany

Published Online: 11 May 2020
Page range: 361 - 376

Abstract

Abstract

Civic engagement faces major challenges, especially in cities affected by declining populations, as social networks have been thinned out and services in the sector of voluntary municipal compulsory tasks have been reduced. At the same time, civic engagement is particularly important in such cities in order to compensate for bottlenecks in services of general interest. This paper examines the life worlds of voluntarily engaged people and aims to contribute to an understanding of the different levels of involvement of certain groups of people in certain phases of life. On the basis of project histories in civic engagement, initiated by younger groups of people, the obstacles and needs experienced by those involved are highlighted. The findings show that bureaucratic and hierarchical hurdles, low appreciation of voluntary work and conflicts of interest between funding bodies and those involved are perceived by the latter as major obstacles. On the other hand, there are individual factors of civic engagement that are in harmony with the conditions of the life worlds of those voluntarily active, such as working together, an open, flexible framework for individual action and its flexible division and organisation. The paper is based on empirical data collected in individual case analyses in the small town Weißwasser in Eastern Germany.

Keywords

  • Civic engagement
  • Bottom-up process
  • Demographic change
  • Structurally weak region
  • Weißwasser

Politik- und Praxis-Perspektive / Policy and practice perspective

access type Open Access

Together, not alongside! Strategies for the development of inter-municipal cooperation in the Stadtregion,of Vienna

Published Online: 06 Jun 2020
Page range: 377 - 395

Abstract

Abstract

The urban region of Vienna (Stadtregion+) is among the most dynamic growth regions in Europe. The management of the population growth poses extensive challenges for the city and its hinterland requiring a common and coordinated procedure. The urban regional cooperation structures are currently weakly institutionalised and barely defined. Against this background, this paper aims at presenting recommendations for the development of informal-cooperative spatial development processes in city regions on an analytical and instrumental level. The theoretical framework is based on a combination of the concept of strategic planning and the approach of soft spaces. The methods include the analysis of functional interconnections, a network analysis as well as the calculation of an interconnection index. By means of the “paradox of interconnection and cooperation” the totally different structures of the city-regional functional interconnections and the inter-municipal cooperation are shown on an analytical level. On an instrumental level, the planning principle of “flexible regionalisation” is presented, which draws upon and further develops the idea of spatial and temporal flexibility in strategic planning. A central element of this principle is the identification of “urban-regional focus areas” defined as specific areas within the urban region. These focus areas are characterised as soft planning spaces, in which to work on common planning and development challenges in an inter-municipal, cooperative and implementation-oriented manner. The applied methods and its findings are critically reflected and discussed, before deriving Vienna-specific and general policy recommendations.

Keywords

  • Urban region of Vienna
  • Cooperation
  • Soft Spaces
  • Functional Interconnections
  • Focus Area
  • Strategic Planning
access type Open Access

Transformation of the wastewater sector – The ability of state level controlling mechanisms to enhance the implementation of resource-oriented sanitation systems

Published Online: 28 Mar 2020
Page range: 397 - 411

Abstract

Abstract

New sanitary systems are an intelligent way to approach wastewater management in the face of demographic and climatic changes. It is also compatible with the emerging paradigm of a resource-oriented management of wastewater. While the general technical applicability of resource-oriented systems has been proven in various projects, the realisation is still on hold. The reasons can be found in several risks for wastewater disposal companies that are linked to the implementation process. Based on an analysis of the general context of an implementation of a new sanitary system in a typical rural area of Eastern Germany, this paper analyses to which extend the implementation of such innovative approaches can be facilitated by the regulation system and which steps need to be taken. According to this aim, risks that can hamper the transformation of the wastewater sector are identified, major administrative controlling mechanisms outlined and depicted in which strategic approach these could be used in order to foster the implementation of resource-oriented sanitary systems. As a result, the feasibility of the implementation of new alternative sanitary systems through the strategic application of the controlling mechanisms is generally proven. However, collaborations of the wastewater sectors with stakeholders of other sectors are required.

Keywords

  • Urban and regional planning
  • Wastewater management
  • New sanitary systems
  • Instruments
  • Management approaches
  • Transformation risks

Rezension / Book review

8 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Hybrid forms of urban production through digitalisation? Trends and cases from North Rhine-Westphalia

Published Online: 10 Apr 2020
Page range: 321 - 336

Abstract

Abstract

Building on current debates on digitalisation and spatial development processes, this paper aims to explore to what extent digitally enhanced production technologies, such as Industry 4.0, enable the emergence of new forms of urban production. Based on theoretical and conceptual considerations, empirical insights are derived from 41 interviews conducted with experts in eight industrial cities in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The results indicate that the commercial application of new digital production technologies instigates novel forms of hybrid digital urban manufacturing which change patterns of previous value creation. The paper develops a more precise understanding of these value creation processes and the locational embeddedness of hybrid digital urban manufacturing.

Keywords

  • Urban production
  • Digital transformation
  • Hybrid production
  • Problem-solving cycle
  • North Rhine-Westphalia
access type Open Access

The regional significance of university locations in Lower Saxony

Published Online: 05 May 2020
Page range: 337 - 359

Abstract

Abstract

Universities are important economic actors and make a considerable impact on the demand and supply side of their local economies. The aim of this paper is to quantify, compare and classify the different economic demand-and supply-side contributions of the university locations within Lower Saxony (Germany) using a combination of multiplier analysis and spatial econometrics on a NUTS 3 level. In comparison to numerous other studies, this paper does not focus on the economic impact of individual cases or a selected university location but gives a complete picture of the importance and significance of all university locations within Lower Saxony. The income-induced direct and indirect demand effects are estimated using a rich data set of higher education statistics in combination with an income and employment multiplier derived from a regional input-output table. The supply-side effects, i.e. the impact of the education and research outcomes, are estimated with the help of spatial panel regressions, a model derived from human capital theory and knowledge spillover theory. The estimation results give a complete and reproducible impression of the importance and significance of the different university locations, offering the opportunity for comparisons and classifications.

Keywords

  • Demand- and supply-side effects
  • multiplier analysis
  • spatial panel model
  • university locations
  • Lower Saxony
access type Open Access

Between co-creation and daily routine: challenges of volunteering people for (re) vitalizing their small town in Eastern Germany

Published Online: 11 May 2020
Page range: 361 - 376

Abstract

Abstract

Civic engagement faces major challenges, especially in cities affected by declining populations, as social networks have been thinned out and services in the sector of voluntary municipal compulsory tasks have been reduced. At the same time, civic engagement is particularly important in such cities in order to compensate for bottlenecks in services of general interest. This paper examines the life worlds of voluntarily engaged people and aims to contribute to an understanding of the different levels of involvement of certain groups of people in certain phases of life. On the basis of project histories in civic engagement, initiated by younger groups of people, the obstacles and needs experienced by those involved are highlighted. The findings show that bureaucratic and hierarchical hurdles, low appreciation of voluntary work and conflicts of interest between funding bodies and those involved are perceived by the latter as major obstacles. On the other hand, there are individual factors of civic engagement that are in harmony with the conditions of the life worlds of those voluntarily active, such as working together, an open, flexible framework for individual action and its flexible division and organisation. The paper is based on empirical data collected in individual case analyses in the small town Weißwasser in Eastern Germany.

Keywords

  • Civic engagement
  • Bottom-up process
  • Demographic change
  • Structurally weak region
  • Weißwasser

Politik- und Praxis-Perspektive / Policy and practice perspective

access type Open Access

Together, not alongside! Strategies for the development of inter-municipal cooperation in the Stadtregion,of Vienna

Published Online: 06 Jun 2020
Page range: 377 - 395

Abstract

Abstract

The urban region of Vienna (Stadtregion+) is among the most dynamic growth regions in Europe. The management of the population growth poses extensive challenges for the city and its hinterland requiring a common and coordinated procedure. The urban regional cooperation structures are currently weakly institutionalised and barely defined. Against this background, this paper aims at presenting recommendations for the development of informal-cooperative spatial development processes in city regions on an analytical and instrumental level. The theoretical framework is based on a combination of the concept of strategic planning and the approach of soft spaces. The methods include the analysis of functional interconnections, a network analysis as well as the calculation of an interconnection index. By means of the “paradox of interconnection and cooperation” the totally different structures of the city-regional functional interconnections and the inter-municipal cooperation are shown on an analytical level. On an instrumental level, the planning principle of “flexible regionalisation” is presented, which draws upon and further develops the idea of spatial and temporal flexibility in strategic planning. A central element of this principle is the identification of “urban-regional focus areas” defined as specific areas within the urban region. These focus areas are characterised as soft planning spaces, in which to work on common planning and development challenges in an inter-municipal, cooperative and implementation-oriented manner. The applied methods and its findings are critically reflected and discussed, before deriving Vienna-specific and general policy recommendations.

Keywords

  • Urban region of Vienna
  • Cooperation
  • Soft Spaces
  • Functional Interconnections
  • Focus Area
  • Strategic Planning
access type Open Access

Transformation of the wastewater sector – The ability of state level controlling mechanisms to enhance the implementation of resource-oriented sanitation systems

Published Online: 28 Mar 2020
Page range: 397 - 411

Abstract

Abstract

New sanitary systems are an intelligent way to approach wastewater management in the face of demographic and climatic changes. It is also compatible with the emerging paradigm of a resource-oriented management of wastewater. While the general technical applicability of resource-oriented systems has been proven in various projects, the realisation is still on hold. The reasons can be found in several risks for wastewater disposal companies that are linked to the implementation process. Based on an analysis of the general context of an implementation of a new sanitary system in a typical rural area of Eastern Germany, this paper analyses to which extend the implementation of such innovative approaches can be facilitated by the regulation system and which steps need to be taken. According to this aim, risks that can hamper the transformation of the wastewater sector are identified, major administrative controlling mechanisms outlined and depicted in which strategic approach these could be used in order to foster the implementation of resource-oriented sanitary systems. As a result, the feasibility of the implementation of new alternative sanitary systems through the strategic application of the controlling mechanisms is generally proven. However, collaborations of the wastewater sectors with stakeholders of other sectors are required.

Keywords

  • Urban and regional planning
  • Wastewater management
  • New sanitary systems
  • Instruments
  • Management approaches
  • Transformation risks

Rezension / Book review

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