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AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Metropolis – size, function and symbolism. A quantitative text analysis of German print media for Berlin and Hamburg

Published Online: 15 Nov 2019
Page range: 213 - 231

Abstract

Abstract

As the epitome of the urban, the city type “metropolis” has been experiencing an ongoing boom for two to three decades. With a quantitative text analysis of the leading German national print media, the patterns of linguistic use for the term metropolis and for the two largest cities Berlin and Hamburg are highlighted. They are interpreted as attributions of meaning in mass media communication processes and generate a semantic field whose analysis allows declarations to be made about size, function and imagery of a metropolis over time.

Keywords

  • Metropolis
  • Lexicometry
  • Print media analysis
  • Hamburg
  • Berlin
access type Open Access

Who is driving land consumption? A comparison of plans and their impact on land use

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 233 - 248

Abstract

Abstract

Controlling settlement development, which is committed to the land-saving objective, requires precise monitoring of settlement development. This paper describes how the use of new land is related to various planning procedures in Germany. The extent to which the Federal Government, the Federal States and the municipalities contribute to land use was empirically determined on the basis of 30 representatively selected municipalities. The results of these studies show that around two thirds of Germany-wide land use is caused by municipalities within the framework of their municipal planning. Other developments resulting from planning approval procedures, for example, are driven by the Federal Government and the Federal States and contribute to one third of land use. The relatively high proportion of non-municipally induced new land use was not expected tobe as high. The result shows that efforts to save land at all spatial and planning levels are necessary in order to achieve the sustainability goals. Such investigations require comprehensive and continuously updated geometric bases for actual land use. This is the only way to measure changes in land use realistically and promptly and to verify the effects of land management. However, the ongoing methodological changes in land-use recording (geodata modelling, land-use nomenclature) and their time-delayed and different implementation in the Federal States have a negative impact on land-use monitoring.

Keywords

  • Land consumption
  • Settlement area
  • Area statistics
  • Monitoring
  • Planning procedures
access type Open Access

From the “project within the project” to the “city within the city”? Governance and Management Problems in Large Urban Development Projects Using the Example of the Science City Belval, Luxembourg

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 249 - 265

Abstract

Abstract

The paper explores the issue of new urban development areas from two specific perspectives: on the one hand, rather than concentrating on housing, we address the question of science and research, in particular university locations and science parks, as a central guiding principle for urban expansion. On the other hand, the paper focuses on the analysis of urban management and governance practices and, more specifically, the disjoining of large projects from their common urban planning context. Emphasis is put on the fact that such undertakings are defined as ‘projects’ and that they are subordinated to a specific management approach. Amid debates concerning large-scale urban development projects and urban governance, we develop the thesis that the risk for projects to unfold as a sort of ‘foreign matter’ in the urban realm increases as the degree to which they are subject to proven planning processes and regulatory practices diminishes. This argument will be empirically illustrated with Belval, the science city in the south of Luxembourg, which is developed ever since 2003 and whose progress is critically assessed here. The general conclusions include planning requirements for dealing with new large-scale development projects.

Keywords

  • Project management
  • Large-scale urban development projects
  • Science locations
  • Urban governance
  • Luxembourg
access type Open Access

Development of individual living space consumption between 1978 and 2013: determinants and transformative potential

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 267 - 287

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, the trend towards increasing per capita living space continues. The achievement of the reduction targets with regard to the energy consumption of residential buildings is thereby counteracted. While the structural drivers behind this development – for example shifts in preferences, increasing prosperity and demographic change – have been well-researched individually, their proportional quantitative power of influence remains uncertain. Based on data from the Income and Expenditure Survey (EVS) for the time period of 1978 to 2013, this paper examines to what extent the development of housing consumption in Germany can be explained by socioeconomic and demographic changes over time. The results of a decomposition analysis show that demographic changes, in particular the reduction of the average household size, are the main responsible drivers for the increase in living space consumption per capita. This development is accompanied by rising housing costs, which increasingly burden all income groups, but especially poorer households. In recent years, the housing cost burden dampened a further expansion of living space consumption. In addition, an imbalance between housing supply and demand can be identified on the local level. This could be reduced by building smaller homes, rebuilding existing homes and encouraging the elderly in oversized homes to relocate. For this purpose, regulatory measures and/or incentive mechanisms would have to be implemented.

Keywords

  • Living space development
  • Living space consumption
  • Demographic change
  • Decomposition analysis
access type Open Access

Sustainable spatial development – landscape identity as theoretical and practical challenge for spatial planning

Published Online: 28 Mar 2020
Page range: 289 - 304

Abstract

Abstract

This paper is based on the assumption that sustainable spatial development requires a relational perspective on space and a specific focus on conflict resolution. These general requests are applied to a specific spatial planning topic: landscape identities. The latter are defined as individual interpretations of specific landscape features referring to both physical environments and social place meanings. For an empirical assessment, landscape identities are operationalized as a variation of the ‘appropriated physical space’. Thus, our core interest is on spatial features used for subjective interpretations about landscape distinctiveness, for the formation of a sense of belonging and togetherness as well as for emotional attachments. Based on these so-called reference points, a determination of identity-relevant conflicts becomes possible, i.e. of opposing landscape identity interpretations. In a rural case study region, landscape identities are made visible using qualitative-reconstructive methods. The results of 28 semi-structured interviews indicate a diverse spectrum of reference points. These features were repeatedly discussed even though the individual meanings ascribed to them vary. Furthermore, our results show conflicting interpretations: the same features are regarded by some as identity-creating, but explicitly not by others. In face of the empirical results, the theoretical and methodological considerations are discussed and planning implications are suggested. A particular focus is on opportunities to deal with conflicting interpretations of landscape identities.

Keywords

  • Sustainable spatial development
  • Spatial planning
  • Landscape identity
  • Relational space
  • Conflicts
  • Qualitative methods

Rezension / Book review

Erratum

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Metropolis – size, function and symbolism. A quantitative text analysis of German print media for Berlin and Hamburg

Published Online: 15 Nov 2019
Page range: 213 - 231

Abstract

Abstract

As the epitome of the urban, the city type “metropolis” has been experiencing an ongoing boom for two to three decades. With a quantitative text analysis of the leading German national print media, the patterns of linguistic use for the term metropolis and for the two largest cities Berlin and Hamburg are highlighted. They are interpreted as attributions of meaning in mass media communication processes and generate a semantic field whose analysis allows declarations to be made about size, function and imagery of a metropolis over time.

Keywords

  • Metropolis
  • Lexicometry
  • Print media analysis
  • Hamburg
  • Berlin
access type Open Access

Who is driving land consumption? A comparison of plans and their impact on land use

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 233 - 248

Abstract

Abstract

Controlling settlement development, which is committed to the land-saving objective, requires precise monitoring of settlement development. This paper describes how the use of new land is related to various planning procedures in Germany. The extent to which the Federal Government, the Federal States and the municipalities contribute to land use was empirically determined on the basis of 30 representatively selected municipalities. The results of these studies show that around two thirds of Germany-wide land use is caused by municipalities within the framework of their municipal planning. Other developments resulting from planning approval procedures, for example, are driven by the Federal Government and the Federal States and contribute to one third of land use. The relatively high proportion of non-municipally induced new land use was not expected tobe as high. The result shows that efforts to save land at all spatial and planning levels are necessary in order to achieve the sustainability goals. Such investigations require comprehensive and continuously updated geometric bases for actual land use. This is the only way to measure changes in land use realistically and promptly and to verify the effects of land management. However, the ongoing methodological changes in land-use recording (geodata modelling, land-use nomenclature) and their time-delayed and different implementation in the Federal States have a negative impact on land-use monitoring.

Keywords

  • Land consumption
  • Settlement area
  • Area statistics
  • Monitoring
  • Planning procedures
access type Open Access

From the “project within the project” to the “city within the city”? Governance and Management Problems in Large Urban Development Projects Using the Example of the Science City Belval, Luxembourg

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 249 - 265

Abstract

Abstract

The paper explores the issue of new urban development areas from two specific perspectives: on the one hand, rather than concentrating on housing, we address the question of science and research, in particular university locations and science parks, as a central guiding principle for urban expansion. On the other hand, the paper focuses on the analysis of urban management and governance practices and, more specifically, the disjoining of large projects from their common urban planning context. Emphasis is put on the fact that such undertakings are defined as ‘projects’ and that they are subordinated to a specific management approach. Amid debates concerning large-scale urban development projects and urban governance, we develop the thesis that the risk for projects to unfold as a sort of ‘foreign matter’ in the urban realm increases as the degree to which they are subject to proven planning processes and regulatory practices diminishes. This argument will be empirically illustrated with Belval, the science city in the south of Luxembourg, which is developed ever since 2003 and whose progress is critically assessed here. The general conclusions include planning requirements for dealing with new large-scale development projects.

Keywords

  • Project management
  • Large-scale urban development projects
  • Science locations
  • Urban governance
  • Luxembourg
access type Open Access

Development of individual living space consumption between 1978 and 2013: determinants and transformative potential

Published Online: 17 Feb 2020
Page range: 267 - 287

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, the trend towards increasing per capita living space continues. The achievement of the reduction targets with regard to the energy consumption of residential buildings is thereby counteracted. While the structural drivers behind this development – for example shifts in preferences, increasing prosperity and demographic change – have been well-researched individually, their proportional quantitative power of influence remains uncertain. Based on data from the Income and Expenditure Survey (EVS) for the time period of 1978 to 2013, this paper examines to what extent the development of housing consumption in Germany can be explained by socioeconomic and demographic changes over time. The results of a decomposition analysis show that demographic changes, in particular the reduction of the average household size, are the main responsible drivers for the increase in living space consumption per capita. This development is accompanied by rising housing costs, which increasingly burden all income groups, but especially poorer households. In recent years, the housing cost burden dampened a further expansion of living space consumption. In addition, an imbalance between housing supply and demand can be identified on the local level. This could be reduced by building smaller homes, rebuilding existing homes and encouraging the elderly in oversized homes to relocate. For this purpose, regulatory measures and/or incentive mechanisms would have to be implemented.

Keywords

  • Living space development
  • Living space consumption
  • Demographic change
  • Decomposition analysis
access type Open Access

Sustainable spatial development – landscape identity as theoretical and practical challenge for spatial planning

Published Online: 28 Mar 2020
Page range: 289 - 304

Abstract

Abstract

This paper is based on the assumption that sustainable spatial development requires a relational perspective on space and a specific focus on conflict resolution. These general requests are applied to a specific spatial planning topic: landscape identities. The latter are defined as individual interpretations of specific landscape features referring to both physical environments and social place meanings. For an empirical assessment, landscape identities are operationalized as a variation of the ‘appropriated physical space’. Thus, our core interest is on spatial features used for subjective interpretations about landscape distinctiveness, for the formation of a sense of belonging and togetherness as well as for emotional attachments. Based on these so-called reference points, a determination of identity-relevant conflicts becomes possible, i.e. of opposing landscape identity interpretations. In a rural case study region, landscape identities are made visible using qualitative-reconstructive methods. The results of 28 semi-structured interviews indicate a diverse spectrum of reference points. These features were repeatedly discussed even though the individual meanings ascribed to them vary. Furthermore, our results show conflicting interpretations: the same features are regarded by some as identity-creating, but explicitly not by others. In face of the empirical results, the theoretical and methodological considerations are discussed and planning implications are suggested. A particular focus is on opportunities to deal with conflicting interpretations of landscape identities.

Keywords

  • Sustainable spatial development
  • Spatial planning
  • Landscape identity
  • Relational space
  • Conflicts
  • Qualitative methods

Rezension / Book review

Erratum

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