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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

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Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

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Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

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Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

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Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

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Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

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Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

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Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

11 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Temporäre räumliche Nähe – Akteure, Orte und Interaktionen

Published Online: 21 Jan 2020
Page range: 1 - 3

Abstract

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Urban manufacturing and temporary spatial proximity in production processes

Published Online: 15 Nov 2019
Page range: 5 - 20

Abstract

Abstract

This article argues that temporary spatial proximity between economic agents can also have a productionrelated purpose besides knowledge generation. At the same time, due to new technological developments and trends, consumer goods are generated by temporary spatial proximity between end customers and producers. The purpose of the temporary exchange is to create material goods meeting the individual demands of the respective customer in real time. The aim of this paper is to analyse production-related temporary spatial proximity of urban manufacturing to show how production sites and locations as well as the relationship with customers are altered. Based on a literature analysis and case studies, production-related temporary spatial proximity in large companies, factories, makerspaces and festivals is examined. The results show that customers are intensively involved in the production process. Changes in the production method and location are the consequence, since it is about the production of individual pieces. In addition, production locations change, as they need to be in retail locations or housing areas, i.e. close to the market where the end consumers are. Production-oriented temporal spatial proximity between producers and consumers and associated inner-city production will not replace mass production of consumer goods. However, it is an important factor influencing the choice of business models and business locations for entrepreneurs given the current trend in the individualisation of consumer goods.

Keywords

  • Co-production
  • Temporary spatial proximity
  • Urban manufacturing
access type Open Access

“Hägerstrand online”: A methodical template for the analysis of space-time trajectories in collaborations

Published Online: 17 Sep 2019
Page range: 21 - 33

Abstract

Abstract

In economic geography, during the last years interest in various aspects of temporality increased, both in the context of short- as well as longer-term physical interaction constellations. Despite the empirical and theoretical differentiation of physical co-presence, two aspects have not been problematized in a sufficiently systematic fashion so far: first, the dichotomous understanding of physical co-presence (that is reduced to a binary differentiation of presence/absence) and, second, the conception of virtual co-presence as a deficient version of communication (that lacks the broad spectrum of sensual cues of face-to-face interaction). To overcome the insufficient conceptualization of co-presence we enrich our geographical argumentation with findings from adjacent disciplines and focus on the modification in communication contexts implied by virtualization. In particular, the intricate entanglement of offline and online interaction dynamics is challenging the established methodical and conceptual geographical approaches. In order to deal with these challenges, we seek to advance the time-geographic model of Torsten Hägerstrand by including the virtual dimension of interactions. The aim of our extension is the development of a methodical template that is suitable to conceptualize empirically space-time trajectories in physical, virtual and (physical-virtual) synthetic contexts. We illustrate our methodical-conceptual extension of the time-geographic model with empirical vignettes from the fields of art (music production in a studio) and science (pharmaceutical research in a laboratory).

Keywords

  • Hägerstrand
  • Time geography
  • Virtuality
  • Co-presence
  • Laboratory
  • Studio
access type Open Access

Choreographies of entrepreneurship. How different formats of co-presence are combined to facilitate knowledge creation in seed accelerator programs

Published Online: 11 Sep 2019
Page range: 35 - 51

Abstract

Abstract

This paper explores different functions of co-presence for collaborative knowledge creation in the context of seed accelerator programs. Seed accelerators offer programs of three to six months to enhance the growth of early-stage start-ups through various means of training and organizational development. In this paper, seed accelerator programs are analysed as orchestrated sequences of different types of physical co-presence. By drawing on qualitative case study data, the paper identifies eight different ways in which physical co-presence is used during seed accelerator programs. Through these eight types of co-presence, the analysis reveals that physical co-presence unfolds unique social dynamics that are utilized in a carefully designed combination of presence and absence. It is shown that physical co-presence is a means to enact relational distance and to bridge this distance for the benefit of the entrepreneurial process. Therefore, this paper adds a new perspective on how co-presence is used to facilitate the generation of value through collaborative knowledge creation.

Keywords

  • Temporary co-presence
  • relational distance
  • entrepreneurship
  • accelerator
access type Open Access

Creativity-enhancing work environments: Eventisation through an inspiring work atmosphere in temporary proximity

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 53 - 70

Abstract

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to understand how work processes and the quality of physical places support creative knowledge generation. The creation of knowledge is linked to both social space and physical place, and is influenced by steady socio-spatial dynamics. In workplaces, the space-time dynamics of knowledge creation coincide with the physical characteristics of place. On the basis of qualitative interviews with Design thinking workshop facilitators, as well as participants, the influence of three types of creative support (psychosocial, inspirational and functional) is linked to the elements of place, people and process in this specific innovation method. This paper discusses in which ways place, people and process contribute to creating a creativity-enhancing workspace and inspiring atmosphere in temporary spatial proximity. Eventisation of the innovation process, and interaction in temporary spatial proximity, are important prerequisites for keeping knowledge creation exciting.

Keywords

  • Creativity-enhancing environments
  • temporary spatial proximity
  • knowledge creation
  • Design thinking
  • eventisation
access type Open Access

Utilizing Temporary Spaces. Location Strategies of Pop-up Restaurants in Berlin

Published Online: 26 Oct 2019
Page range: 71 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

The paper engages with the accompanying location strategies of temporary catering businesses. Hereby, the contemporary trend of so-called pop-up restaurants in Berlin emphasizes a paragon for both the ‘temporality’ and ‘eventisation’ of economic activities. Against this background, a methodology mix consisting of quantitative (generation of a database) and quantitative methods (a series of semi-structured expert interviews) provides the breeding ground for an inductive analysis of this emergent phenomenon. The latter aligns with principles of Grounded Theory and attempts to assemble the current sparse insights with regard to this subject. The results show manifold objectives when running these temporary catering businesses comprising economic (profit-seeking, advertising and brand recognition, product testing and concept design), social/societal (connecting people, staging an extraordinary experience) and personal reasons (personal and professional fulfillment). Concerning locational choice, different location strategies of pop-ups become visible in this realm: either as locational cooperatives with business and/or communicative synergies or as isolated and closed events at unusual locations, which, however, always strive for a holistic experience with a distinctive atmosphere in the sense of “valorisation of a temporarily organised uniqueness”. These trends point to imperatives of an emerging cognitive-cultural capitalism, which is based on an eventisation of economic activities exploiting both the scarce resource “attention” and the memorability of experiences.

Keywords

  • Temporary catering
  • Location strategies
  • Attention economy
  • Experience economy
  • Cognitive-cultural capitalism
  • Berlin
access type Open Access

Temporarily used places of multi-local living employees. Challenges and potentials for operational and regional developments in rural areas of Lower Saxony

Published Online: 28 Aug 2019
Page range: 89 - 105

Abstract

Abstract

Due to globalization processes in connection with increasing individualization and pluralization of lifestyles as well as flexible working environments, spatial mobility is increasing. A multi-local way of life, thus living in several places, is becoming more and more important. This paper presents the first results of an analysis of occupational multi-local lifestyles in rural areas. This contribution aims to identify challenges and potentials of multi-local lifestyles for operational and regional developments and to formulate associated possible fields of action for political-planning practice and entrepreneurial practice. With the help of qualitative methods, a case study analysis was carried out in the district Diepholz in Lower Saxony (Germany). The article first discusses the motives and circumstances that ensure that employees (have to) live in several places. Afterwards, the organization of everyday life and working life of the persons living in temporarily used places is explained. Furthermore, it will be shown which operational and regional framework conditions and structures influence these lifestyles, as well as the significance of job-related multi-locality for operational and regional developments.

Keywords

  • Mutli-locality
  • Rural areas
  • Everyday life
  • Companies
  • Regional development
  • Lower Saxony
  • Diepholz

Rezension / Book review

Liste der reviewer / List of reviewers

access type Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2019

Published Online: 04 Mar 2020
Page range: 117 - 118

Abstract

11 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Temporäre räumliche Nähe – Akteure, Orte und Interaktionen

Published Online: 21 Jan 2020
Page range: 1 - 3

Abstract

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Urban manufacturing and temporary spatial proximity in production processes

Published Online: 15 Nov 2019
Page range: 5 - 20

Abstract

Abstract

This article argues that temporary spatial proximity between economic agents can also have a productionrelated purpose besides knowledge generation. At the same time, due to new technological developments and trends, consumer goods are generated by temporary spatial proximity between end customers and producers. The purpose of the temporary exchange is to create material goods meeting the individual demands of the respective customer in real time. The aim of this paper is to analyse production-related temporary spatial proximity of urban manufacturing to show how production sites and locations as well as the relationship with customers are altered. Based on a literature analysis and case studies, production-related temporary spatial proximity in large companies, factories, makerspaces and festivals is examined. The results show that customers are intensively involved in the production process. Changes in the production method and location are the consequence, since it is about the production of individual pieces. In addition, production locations change, as they need to be in retail locations or housing areas, i.e. close to the market where the end consumers are. Production-oriented temporal spatial proximity between producers and consumers and associated inner-city production will not replace mass production of consumer goods. However, it is an important factor influencing the choice of business models and business locations for entrepreneurs given the current trend in the individualisation of consumer goods.

Keywords

  • Co-production
  • Temporary spatial proximity
  • Urban manufacturing
access type Open Access

“Hägerstrand online”: A methodical template for the analysis of space-time trajectories in collaborations

Published Online: 17 Sep 2019
Page range: 21 - 33

Abstract

Abstract

In economic geography, during the last years interest in various aspects of temporality increased, both in the context of short- as well as longer-term physical interaction constellations. Despite the empirical and theoretical differentiation of physical co-presence, two aspects have not been problematized in a sufficiently systematic fashion so far: first, the dichotomous understanding of physical co-presence (that is reduced to a binary differentiation of presence/absence) and, second, the conception of virtual co-presence as a deficient version of communication (that lacks the broad spectrum of sensual cues of face-to-face interaction). To overcome the insufficient conceptualization of co-presence we enrich our geographical argumentation with findings from adjacent disciplines and focus on the modification in communication contexts implied by virtualization. In particular, the intricate entanglement of offline and online interaction dynamics is challenging the established methodical and conceptual geographical approaches. In order to deal with these challenges, we seek to advance the time-geographic model of Torsten Hägerstrand by including the virtual dimension of interactions. The aim of our extension is the development of a methodical template that is suitable to conceptualize empirically space-time trajectories in physical, virtual and (physical-virtual) synthetic contexts. We illustrate our methodical-conceptual extension of the time-geographic model with empirical vignettes from the fields of art (music production in a studio) and science (pharmaceutical research in a laboratory).

Keywords

  • Hägerstrand
  • Time geography
  • Virtuality
  • Co-presence
  • Laboratory
  • Studio
access type Open Access

Choreographies of entrepreneurship. How different formats of co-presence are combined to facilitate knowledge creation in seed accelerator programs

Published Online: 11 Sep 2019
Page range: 35 - 51

Abstract

Abstract

This paper explores different functions of co-presence for collaborative knowledge creation in the context of seed accelerator programs. Seed accelerators offer programs of three to six months to enhance the growth of early-stage start-ups through various means of training and organizational development. In this paper, seed accelerator programs are analysed as orchestrated sequences of different types of physical co-presence. By drawing on qualitative case study data, the paper identifies eight different ways in which physical co-presence is used during seed accelerator programs. Through these eight types of co-presence, the analysis reveals that physical co-presence unfolds unique social dynamics that are utilized in a carefully designed combination of presence and absence. It is shown that physical co-presence is a means to enact relational distance and to bridge this distance for the benefit of the entrepreneurial process. Therefore, this paper adds a new perspective on how co-presence is used to facilitate the generation of value through collaborative knowledge creation.

Keywords

  • Temporary co-presence
  • relational distance
  • entrepreneurship
  • accelerator
access type Open Access

Creativity-enhancing work environments: Eventisation through an inspiring work atmosphere in temporary proximity

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 53 - 70

Abstract

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to understand how work processes and the quality of physical places support creative knowledge generation. The creation of knowledge is linked to both social space and physical place, and is influenced by steady socio-spatial dynamics. In workplaces, the space-time dynamics of knowledge creation coincide with the physical characteristics of place. On the basis of qualitative interviews with Design thinking workshop facilitators, as well as participants, the influence of three types of creative support (psychosocial, inspirational and functional) is linked to the elements of place, people and process in this specific innovation method. This paper discusses in which ways place, people and process contribute to creating a creativity-enhancing workspace and inspiring atmosphere in temporary spatial proximity. Eventisation of the innovation process, and interaction in temporary spatial proximity, are important prerequisites for keeping knowledge creation exciting.

Keywords

  • Creativity-enhancing environments
  • temporary spatial proximity
  • knowledge creation
  • Design thinking
  • eventisation
access type Open Access

Utilizing Temporary Spaces. Location Strategies of Pop-up Restaurants in Berlin

Published Online: 26 Oct 2019
Page range: 71 - 87

Abstract

Abstract

The paper engages with the accompanying location strategies of temporary catering businesses. Hereby, the contemporary trend of so-called pop-up restaurants in Berlin emphasizes a paragon for both the ‘temporality’ and ‘eventisation’ of economic activities. Against this background, a methodology mix consisting of quantitative (generation of a database) and quantitative methods (a series of semi-structured expert interviews) provides the breeding ground for an inductive analysis of this emergent phenomenon. The latter aligns with principles of Grounded Theory and attempts to assemble the current sparse insights with regard to this subject. The results show manifold objectives when running these temporary catering businesses comprising economic (profit-seeking, advertising and brand recognition, product testing and concept design), social/societal (connecting people, staging an extraordinary experience) and personal reasons (personal and professional fulfillment). Concerning locational choice, different location strategies of pop-ups become visible in this realm: either as locational cooperatives with business and/or communicative synergies or as isolated and closed events at unusual locations, which, however, always strive for a holistic experience with a distinctive atmosphere in the sense of “valorisation of a temporarily organised uniqueness”. These trends point to imperatives of an emerging cognitive-cultural capitalism, which is based on an eventisation of economic activities exploiting both the scarce resource “attention” and the memorability of experiences.

Keywords

  • Temporary catering
  • Location strategies
  • Attention economy
  • Experience economy
  • Cognitive-cultural capitalism
  • Berlin
access type Open Access

Temporarily used places of multi-local living employees. Challenges and potentials for operational and regional developments in rural areas of Lower Saxony

Published Online: 28 Aug 2019
Page range: 89 - 105

Abstract

Abstract

Due to globalization processes in connection with increasing individualization and pluralization of lifestyles as well as flexible working environments, spatial mobility is increasing. A multi-local way of life, thus living in several places, is becoming more and more important. This paper presents the first results of an analysis of occupational multi-local lifestyles in rural areas. This contribution aims to identify challenges and potentials of multi-local lifestyles for operational and regional developments and to formulate associated possible fields of action for political-planning practice and entrepreneurial practice. With the help of qualitative methods, a case study analysis was carried out in the district Diepholz in Lower Saxony (Germany). The article first discusses the motives and circumstances that ensure that employees (have to) live in several places. Afterwards, the organization of everyday life and working life of the persons living in temporarily used places is explained. Furthermore, it will be shown which operational and regional framework conditions and structures influence these lifestyles, as well as the significance of job-related multi-locality for operational and regional developments.

Keywords

  • Mutli-locality
  • Rural areas
  • Everyday life
  • Companies
  • Regional development
  • Lower Saxony
  • Diepholz

Rezension / Book review

Liste der reviewer / List of reviewers

access type Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2019

Published Online: 04 Mar 2020
Page range: 117 - 118

Abstract

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