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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Between the denial of realities and pragmatism: migration-led regeneration in Genova and Manchester

Published Online: 12 Aug 2019
Page range: 549 - 565

Abstract

Abstract

Starting from the assumption that urban politics are a fundamental part of an evolving local governance of migration, this article investigates the overlappings between migration-related policies and migrant agency on one hand and urban regeneration policies on the other hand. As European cities are embedded in (supra-)national migration regimes, the institutional responses on migration vary accordingly. The here presented comparison between two cities in two migration regimes allows for an understanding of common traits and differences of the urban governance of migration across the different migration regimes. For this purpose the situation in Genova (Italy) and Manchester (UK) is in the focus of the analysis. The comparison reveals that as well cities with long-established migration policies as those with a poorly developed institutional setting strongly rely on the agency of the civil society. Migration-led regeneration takes place, but is not framed explicitly within the urban policies and strategies of regeneration.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Integration
  • Multiculturalism
  • Genova
  • Manchester
  • Planning
access type Open Access

„Urban Citizenship" und räumliche Aushandlungsprozesse zwischen türkischen Migranten und syrischen Flüchtlingen

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 567 - 581

Abstract

Abstract

This article critically discusses how Turkish migrants as an established migrant group have interpreted and acted on the arrival of Syrian refugees in Berlin from 2015 onwards and whether their responses have resulted in new spaces in which new contestations and/or solidarities emerge. To this end, it focuses on the processes and the ways in which established groups (re-)articulate their urban citizenship and belonging to a particular urban space in relation to newcomers. Building on the analytical framework of relational and agency-centered articulation of urban citizenship and drawing on research data collected in the Kreuzberg and Neukölln neighborhoods of Berlin, the analysis has two main findings. Firstly, Turkish migrants have been involved in solidarity activities and contribute to a more inclusive urban citizenship regarding Syrian refugees. At the same time, they perceive Syrian refugees as a threat to their standing in the city and their right to the usage of urban space. This results in a more defensive urban citizenship against the refugees. Secondly, the unequal power relations and local, national and transitional dynamics act as intervening factors shaping Turkish migrants' responses to Syrian refugees and the process of urban citizenship formation.

Keywords

  • Berlin
  • urban citizenship
  • Turkish migrants
  • Syrian refugees
  • spatial encounter
access type Open Access

Paradoxe Aushandlungen von Migration im Diskurs um die Leipziger Eisenbahnstraße Paradoxical negotiations of migration in discourses around the Eisenbahnstraße in the city of Leipzig

Published Online: 11 May 2019
Page range: 583 - 600

Abstract

Abstract

Urban diversity discourses imply paradoxical configurations which, especially on the level of urban neighbourhoods, can be read as the inclusion of desired migration in connection with the exclusion of non-desired migration. In order to focus on novel shifts or rather the reciprocal conditioning of social in- and exclusions in the process of the internationalization and diversification of cities, the authors refer to the notion of paradox in the sense of a heuristic approach. Based on this, the paper examines seemingly contradictory in- and exclusions of migration in a long-standing key area of urban development policies. An analysis of the local media coverage and urban development documents demonstrates that in the discourse around Leipzig’s “Eisenbahnstraße”, a classical discursive figure is reproduced. It debates migration on the one hand as economic resource and problematises it, on the other, as a factor of unproductive deviance. Because of the fact that forms of social participation are bound to exclusions and control elsewhere, apparently paradoxical discursive logics emerge in the dealing with a pluralised urban space strongly shaped through migration. The fact that the invocation of a “parallel world” is explicitly directed towards a migrant population while the discourse on the “city of diversity” remains diffuse and largely anonymous, contradicts the general recognition of the realities of plural immigration societies. Despite or rather due to Leipzig’s pioneering role as regards to migration in the Eastern German context, migration (still) lacks the matter of course and remains a highly sensitive issue.

Keywords

  • Integration policies
  • Postmigrant society
  • Media discourse
  • Urban development
  • Leipzig
  • Eastern Germany
access type Open Access

Interim uses in different urban contexts. The cases of Leipzig and Dessau-Roßlau

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 601 - 615

Abstract

Abstract

Interim uses have played an important role in research and planning for about 15-20 years. Interim uses were previously negated or dismissed as a marginal phenomenon. Today they are considered to play a central role in dealing with the consequences of shrinking. This paper uses a contrasting comparison to explore how interim uses work in different urban contexts. It compares a continuously shrinking medium-sized city (Dessau-Roßlau) with a large city (Leipzig) that has gone through different phases over the past three decades (shrinkage, reurbanisation and growth). The result of the comparison is that urban contexts, i.e. the respective urban development phases, are decisive framework conditions for interim uses. A critical mass of interim users is needed as demanders of interim uses and a proactive attitude of city policy and administration towards interim uses. These conditions are particularly present in large cities and metropolises as well as in contexts of reurbanisation and growth. Reurbanisation or moderate growth after shrinkage can be seen as an optimal urban context for interim uses. From this perspective, the predominant thematisation of interim uses as an “instrument of shrinkage” seems too one-sided or misleading. The effects of interim use in a context of a medium-sized city such as Dessau-Roßlau are rather small or even marginal. Shrinking medium-sized towns and even more so small towns should therefore not be given exaggerated hopes with regard to the effects of the interim use instrument: Interim uses are not best practice for all cities.

Keywords

  • Interim uses
  • Shrinkage
  • Reurbanisation
  • Growth
  • Leipzig
  • Dessau-Roßlau
access type Open Access

How to measure the usage of regional potentials of renewable energies. An empirical analysis of German counties

Published Online: 26 Sep 2019
Page range: 617 - 638

Abstract

Abstract

This paper answers two rarely considered questions: How well do German regions exploit their potential to produce renewable energy and which factors impact on this exploitation efficiency? By applying the new quantitative-empirical concept of exploitation efficiency, we measure the degree, to which regions have exploited their natural and socio-economic potentials of producing energy from renewable source at a specific point in time. This approach allows, with respect to wind power, solar power and biogas energy, a relative comparison of regions, monitoring their performance over time as well as the identification of best-practice regions. Applying our innovative method, we compare German districts in the time period 2000-2014. We use a robust, non-parametric efficiency analysis and validate its results by qualitative expert interviews in selected counties in Lower Saxony. The results show strong disparities in terms of the exploitation efficiency between districts and federal states. This exploitation efficiency moreover varies significantly for different types of renewable energy. We also observe specialization tendencies in this context. Our empirical results are very detailed both from a spatial and from a temporal perspective and therefore allow for drawing several conclusions for local and federal state policies. For instance, those districts (and federal states) with currently rather low exploitation efficiencies need to learn from those with high efficiencies. Such learning effects may sustainably contribute to a successful turnaround in energy policy.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Measurement
  • Efficiency
  • Potential for expansion
  • Regions
  • Germany

Rezension / Book review

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Between the denial of realities and pragmatism: migration-led regeneration in Genova and Manchester

Published Online: 12 Aug 2019
Page range: 549 - 565

Abstract

Abstract

Starting from the assumption that urban politics are a fundamental part of an evolving local governance of migration, this article investigates the overlappings between migration-related policies and migrant agency on one hand and urban regeneration policies on the other hand. As European cities are embedded in (supra-)national migration regimes, the institutional responses on migration vary accordingly. The here presented comparison between two cities in two migration regimes allows for an understanding of common traits and differences of the urban governance of migration across the different migration regimes. For this purpose the situation in Genova (Italy) and Manchester (UK) is in the focus of the analysis. The comparison reveals that as well cities with long-established migration policies as those with a poorly developed institutional setting strongly rely on the agency of the civil society. Migration-led regeneration takes place, but is not framed explicitly within the urban policies and strategies of regeneration.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Integration
  • Multiculturalism
  • Genova
  • Manchester
  • Planning
access type Open Access

„Urban Citizenship" und räumliche Aushandlungsprozesse zwischen türkischen Migranten und syrischen Flüchtlingen

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 567 - 581

Abstract

Abstract

This article critically discusses how Turkish migrants as an established migrant group have interpreted and acted on the arrival of Syrian refugees in Berlin from 2015 onwards and whether their responses have resulted in new spaces in which new contestations and/or solidarities emerge. To this end, it focuses on the processes and the ways in which established groups (re-)articulate their urban citizenship and belonging to a particular urban space in relation to newcomers. Building on the analytical framework of relational and agency-centered articulation of urban citizenship and drawing on research data collected in the Kreuzberg and Neukölln neighborhoods of Berlin, the analysis has two main findings. Firstly, Turkish migrants have been involved in solidarity activities and contribute to a more inclusive urban citizenship regarding Syrian refugees. At the same time, they perceive Syrian refugees as a threat to their standing in the city and their right to the usage of urban space. This results in a more defensive urban citizenship against the refugees. Secondly, the unequal power relations and local, national and transitional dynamics act as intervening factors shaping Turkish migrants' responses to Syrian refugees and the process of urban citizenship formation.

Keywords

  • Berlin
  • urban citizenship
  • Turkish migrants
  • Syrian refugees
  • spatial encounter
access type Open Access

Paradoxe Aushandlungen von Migration im Diskurs um die Leipziger Eisenbahnstraße Paradoxical negotiations of migration in discourses around the Eisenbahnstraße in the city of Leipzig

Published Online: 11 May 2019
Page range: 583 - 600

Abstract

Abstract

Urban diversity discourses imply paradoxical configurations which, especially on the level of urban neighbourhoods, can be read as the inclusion of desired migration in connection with the exclusion of non-desired migration. In order to focus on novel shifts or rather the reciprocal conditioning of social in- and exclusions in the process of the internationalization and diversification of cities, the authors refer to the notion of paradox in the sense of a heuristic approach. Based on this, the paper examines seemingly contradictory in- and exclusions of migration in a long-standing key area of urban development policies. An analysis of the local media coverage and urban development documents demonstrates that in the discourse around Leipzig’s “Eisenbahnstraße”, a classical discursive figure is reproduced. It debates migration on the one hand as economic resource and problematises it, on the other, as a factor of unproductive deviance. Because of the fact that forms of social participation are bound to exclusions and control elsewhere, apparently paradoxical discursive logics emerge in the dealing with a pluralised urban space strongly shaped through migration. The fact that the invocation of a “parallel world” is explicitly directed towards a migrant population while the discourse on the “city of diversity” remains diffuse and largely anonymous, contradicts the general recognition of the realities of plural immigration societies. Despite or rather due to Leipzig’s pioneering role as regards to migration in the Eastern German context, migration (still) lacks the matter of course and remains a highly sensitive issue.

Keywords

  • Integration policies
  • Postmigrant society
  • Media discourse
  • Urban development
  • Leipzig
  • Eastern Germany
access type Open Access

Interim uses in different urban contexts. The cases of Leipzig and Dessau-Roßlau

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 601 - 615

Abstract

Abstract

Interim uses have played an important role in research and planning for about 15-20 years. Interim uses were previously negated or dismissed as a marginal phenomenon. Today they are considered to play a central role in dealing with the consequences of shrinking. This paper uses a contrasting comparison to explore how interim uses work in different urban contexts. It compares a continuously shrinking medium-sized city (Dessau-Roßlau) with a large city (Leipzig) that has gone through different phases over the past three decades (shrinkage, reurbanisation and growth). The result of the comparison is that urban contexts, i.e. the respective urban development phases, are decisive framework conditions for interim uses. A critical mass of interim users is needed as demanders of interim uses and a proactive attitude of city policy and administration towards interim uses. These conditions are particularly present in large cities and metropolises as well as in contexts of reurbanisation and growth. Reurbanisation or moderate growth after shrinkage can be seen as an optimal urban context for interim uses. From this perspective, the predominant thematisation of interim uses as an “instrument of shrinkage” seems too one-sided or misleading. The effects of interim use in a context of a medium-sized city such as Dessau-Roßlau are rather small or even marginal. Shrinking medium-sized towns and even more so small towns should therefore not be given exaggerated hopes with regard to the effects of the interim use instrument: Interim uses are not best practice for all cities.

Keywords

  • Interim uses
  • Shrinkage
  • Reurbanisation
  • Growth
  • Leipzig
  • Dessau-Roßlau
access type Open Access

How to measure the usage of regional potentials of renewable energies. An empirical analysis of German counties

Published Online: 26 Sep 2019
Page range: 617 - 638

Abstract

Abstract

This paper answers two rarely considered questions: How well do German regions exploit their potential to produce renewable energy and which factors impact on this exploitation efficiency? By applying the new quantitative-empirical concept of exploitation efficiency, we measure the degree, to which regions have exploited their natural and socio-economic potentials of producing energy from renewable source at a specific point in time. This approach allows, with respect to wind power, solar power and biogas energy, a relative comparison of regions, monitoring their performance over time as well as the identification of best-practice regions. Applying our innovative method, we compare German districts in the time period 2000-2014. We use a robust, non-parametric efficiency analysis and validate its results by qualitative expert interviews in selected counties in Lower Saxony. The results show strong disparities in terms of the exploitation efficiency between districts and federal states. This exploitation efficiency moreover varies significantly for different types of renewable energy. We also observe specialization tendencies in this context. Our empirical results are very detailed both from a spatial and from a temporal perspective and therefore allow for drawing several conclusions for local and federal state policies. For instance, those districts (and federal states) with currently rather low exploitation efficiencies need to learn from those with high efficiencies. Such learning effects may sustainably contribute to a successful turnaround in energy policy.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Measurement
  • Efficiency
  • Potential for expansion
  • Regions
  • Germany

Rezension / Book review

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