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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Children’s Mobility. State of the Research and Planning Concepts

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 441 - 456

Abstract

Abstract

Children’s travel behaviour has emerged as a research field in the past years that can hardly be overseen anymore, yet Germany has remained remarkably silent in this field. The motivations for this research are primarily in the increase in being driven at the expense of non-motorised and/or independent mobility of children. This trend has negative implications for the development and health of the children, and it raises problems in traffic safety, the environment and more. The paper gives an overview of the research field. It discusses research foci, methods, and factors that affect children’s mobility. What is more, it discusses the – rather scarce – practical literature and shows ways how to support non-motorised and/or independent mobility of children.

Keywords

  • Children‘s travel behaviour
  • Independent mobility
  • Travel mode choice
  • School trip
  • School transport
access type Open Access

Image and implementation of sustainable urban development: Showcase projects and other projects in Freiburg, Heidelberg and Tübingen, Germany

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 457 - 474

Abstract

Abstract

The principles of sustainability are currently applied in Germany and many other countries as important guidelines for urban development. However, different forms of understanding regarding sustainable development and different approaches concerning its implementation can be found in various spatial contexts. This paper focuses on Freiburg, Heidelberg and Tübingen, three cities in southwestern Germany. These cities produce different images due to ambitious urban development plans which are based on the three pillars of ecological, economic and social sustainability in different ways. Numerous similarities between these three cities notwithstanding, they highlight different aspects of sustainable urban development and emphasise them via particularly widespread awareness of ‘showcase projects’. For Freiburg, this includes Vauban and Rieselfeld, for Heidelberg Bahnstadt, and for Tübingen Französisches Viertel and Loretto. The central questions in this paper are therefore: How do images and the implementation of sustainability differ with regard to the three pillars of sustainability? How can differences and similarities with regard to the three pillars of sustainability be explained and what consequences can be drawn for future studies in sustainable urban development? Following a classification of research perspectives on sustainable urban development, distinguishing between more practically oriented aspects, on the one hand, and theory-based critical considerations, on the other, this article examines showcase projects from the three selected cities on the basis of planning documents, websites, local newspapers and academic literature. Moreover, further projects are taken into consideration. The paper concludes with general observations and discussions concerning the image and implementation of sustainable urban development.

Keywords

  • Sustainable urban development
  • conversion areas
  • image
  • Freiburg
  • Heidelberg
  • Tübingen
access type Open Access

Change of the rural area in the knowledge society

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 475 - 491

Abstract

Abstract

In the knowledge society, spatial structure is differentiated, and as a result of this process the rural area no longer appears as a homogenous entity. The “reflexive modernity” of the knowledge society does not seem to know any determinism concerning spatial development-differences, but rather provides new scope to people for acquiring and valorizing different areas. New development impulses could be triggered in the so far peripherally assessed rural area through those extended options. In order to review these assumptions, this paper asks from a theoretical perspective how the cultural, social, economic and technical dimensions of the knowledge society interact with space, and what challenges and strategies may arise for rural areas. The empirical verification is based on results of a working group of the Academy of Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) about the knowledge society in rural-peripheral regions and more qualitative and quantitative studies about the topic. Analysis shows that in many, but not in all regions new knowledge society shaped life cultures evolved differentiating from urban social models. They prove a new attractiveness of the rural area, which are also expressed in knowledge-based projects of culture, education, public services and entrepreneurial commitment. There are a lot of examples especially in economic competitive regions but also in peripheral regions suffering population loss. It needs more studies to determine how the approaches can be used by public and private players to promote the knowledge-society based change. They could help using the gained experience in successful regions for political and planning support in peripheral rural towns and regions.

Keywords

  • Knowledge society
  • Rural area
  • Cultural change
  • Education- and knowledge-networks
  • Social capital
  • Spatial development
access type Open Access

Growing by whom? How urban development strategies deal with migration in Bremen and Leipzig

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 493 - 509

Abstract

Abstract

The article examines the urban development strategies of Bremen and Leipzig with regard to their dealing with migration. The key questions of the article are as follows: Which target groups of migrants prefer urban development policies in order to achieve growth goals? To what extent is there a change of perspective on migration from problems to potentials of urban development? Our empirical results show that both cities focus primarily on the immigration of young and highly skilled workers. Both cities also rely on the immigration of students and try to keep them after graduation. However, this orientation is difficult to put into practice, because in both cities the number of job opportunites for highly qualified people is limited. The importance of immigration from abroad, which is the most increasing growth segment, was initially less well perceived by both cities and has only gained more strategic importance in recent years. International immigration is simultaneously perceived as potential and problem in the urban development concepts of both cities. The article discusses the dilemmas of cities in dealing with migration. These include, in particular, the lack of control capacity in terms of migrant selection and recruitment, a "dual regime" between growth and integration policies, and often a selective focus on subgroups of actual immigration.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Strategic city planning
  • Regeneration
  • Bremen
  • Leipzig
access type Open Access

The role of arrival spaces in integrating immigrants. A critical literature review

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 511 - 524

Abstract

Abstract

The many new forms of migration and the increasing diversification of our societies are leaving their mark on urban spaces. In the arrival spaces featuring high levels of migrants, we tend also to find higher levels of poverty, irrespective of whether the households concerned have a migration background or not. Such neighbourhoods, often referred to in Germany as "migrant neighbourhoods" or "ethnic colonies", have long been a focus of geographic and sociological urban research. Closely connected with such neighbourhoods is the discussion over context effects and their potential to create disadvantage. The starting point for this paper is the observation that most research into such context effects highlights deficits, without taking sufficient account of those factors and mechanisms influencing migrants' access to societal resources. The article thus takes a look at available empirical and theoretical research, highlighting three current aspects influencing such access in arrival spaces: the increasingly multi-local contacts of these migrants, the specific concentration of migrant-related opportunity structures in certain sub-districts of our cities, and governance processes reacting to increasing diversity and constantly changing needs. Currently predominantly focused on ring-fenced neighbourhoods, the article aims to further integration research, calling for greater priority to be attached to looking at the day-to-day lives and practices of migrants. The characteristics and dynamics of arrival spaces illustrate the growing permeability of spatial and social structures, highlighting the need to think out of the neighbourhood box when discussing integration.

Keywords

  • Arrival spaces
  • Migration
  • (Super-)Diversity
  • Neighbourhood effects
  • Immigrant integration
  • Cross-local ties
  • Opportunity structures
access type Open Access

Social differentiation and increasing social heterogeneity in Leipzig, Germany, in light of daily life perceptions and policy-making

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 525 - 540

Abstract

Abstract

Social differentiation has developed to be one of the crucial characteristics of urban development in Eastern Germany's large cities, an issue that is increasingly reflected in daily life perceptions and policy-making. This development can be especially observed in those cities that, after a phase of shrinkage in the 1990s, have seen new growth during the last years. The focus is here on social differentiation that we understand as an increase in social inequalities, and on social heterogeneity that is understood as pluralization of cultural and religious identities, lifestyles and living environments. Set against this background, the paper discusses social differentiation and increasing heterogeneity in Leipzig with a focus on daily life perceptions by the residents and local policy development. It analyses how social difference and increasing heterogeneity have become an issue for daily routines and practices as well as for policy formulation and how both perspectives interact. The paper is based on a multi-dimensional understanding of heterogeneity including the socio-economic, demographic, lifestyle and ethnic-migration dimension. Spatially, both the total city and neighbourhood perspective are in focus. The paper concludes, among others, that social heterogeneity in its horizontal dimension is being recognised and accepted and that this is reflected by policy development as well. This does not apply in the same manner for increasing social inequalities. The example of Leipzig shows, furthermore, that there is a need for more differentiation in the local discourse with respect to the explicit recognition of horizontal difference, the need to counteract vertical social inequalities and the fact that out of the interaction/intersection of both dimensions, a bundle of new equivocalities and complexities emerge.

Keywords

  • Social differentiation
  • Social heterogeneity
  • Daily practices
  • Policy-making
  • Leipzig

Rezension / Book review

access type Open Access

Book Review: Die Entwicklung neuer Stadtquartiere aus städtebaulicher Sicht. Analyse der Projekte seit 1990

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 541 - 543

Abstract

access type Open Access

Cham: Springer Open. 310 pages. = Klaus Tschira Symposia, Knowledge and Space 13

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 545 - 547

Abstract

8 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Children’s Mobility. State of the Research and Planning Concepts

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 441 - 456

Abstract

Abstract

Children’s travel behaviour has emerged as a research field in the past years that can hardly be overseen anymore, yet Germany has remained remarkably silent in this field. The motivations for this research are primarily in the increase in being driven at the expense of non-motorised and/or independent mobility of children. This trend has negative implications for the development and health of the children, and it raises problems in traffic safety, the environment and more. The paper gives an overview of the research field. It discusses research foci, methods, and factors that affect children’s mobility. What is more, it discusses the – rather scarce – practical literature and shows ways how to support non-motorised and/or independent mobility of children.

Keywords

  • Children‘s travel behaviour
  • Independent mobility
  • Travel mode choice
  • School trip
  • School transport
access type Open Access

Image and implementation of sustainable urban development: Showcase projects and other projects in Freiburg, Heidelberg and Tübingen, Germany

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 457 - 474

Abstract

Abstract

The principles of sustainability are currently applied in Germany and many other countries as important guidelines for urban development. However, different forms of understanding regarding sustainable development and different approaches concerning its implementation can be found in various spatial contexts. This paper focuses on Freiburg, Heidelberg and Tübingen, three cities in southwestern Germany. These cities produce different images due to ambitious urban development plans which are based on the three pillars of ecological, economic and social sustainability in different ways. Numerous similarities between these three cities notwithstanding, they highlight different aspects of sustainable urban development and emphasise them via particularly widespread awareness of ‘showcase projects’. For Freiburg, this includes Vauban and Rieselfeld, for Heidelberg Bahnstadt, and for Tübingen Französisches Viertel and Loretto. The central questions in this paper are therefore: How do images and the implementation of sustainability differ with regard to the three pillars of sustainability? How can differences and similarities with regard to the three pillars of sustainability be explained and what consequences can be drawn for future studies in sustainable urban development? Following a classification of research perspectives on sustainable urban development, distinguishing between more practically oriented aspects, on the one hand, and theory-based critical considerations, on the other, this article examines showcase projects from the three selected cities on the basis of planning documents, websites, local newspapers and academic literature. Moreover, further projects are taken into consideration. The paper concludes with general observations and discussions concerning the image and implementation of sustainable urban development.

Keywords

  • Sustainable urban development
  • conversion areas
  • image
  • Freiburg
  • Heidelberg
  • Tübingen
access type Open Access

Change of the rural area in the knowledge society

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 475 - 491

Abstract

Abstract

In the knowledge society, spatial structure is differentiated, and as a result of this process the rural area no longer appears as a homogenous entity. The “reflexive modernity” of the knowledge society does not seem to know any determinism concerning spatial development-differences, but rather provides new scope to people for acquiring and valorizing different areas. New development impulses could be triggered in the so far peripherally assessed rural area through those extended options. In order to review these assumptions, this paper asks from a theoretical perspective how the cultural, social, economic and technical dimensions of the knowledge society interact with space, and what challenges and strategies may arise for rural areas. The empirical verification is based on results of a working group of the Academy of Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) about the knowledge society in rural-peripheral regions and more qualitative and quantitative studies about the topic. Analysis shows that in many, but not in all regions new knowledge society shaped life cultures evolved differentiating from urban social models. They prove a new attractiveness of the rural area, which are also expressed in knowledge-based projects of culture, education, public services and entrepreneurial commitment. There are a lot of examples especially in economic competitive regions but also in peripheral regions suffering population loss. It needs more studies to determine how the approaches can be used by public and private players to promote the knowledge-society based change. They could help using the gained experience in successful regions for political and planning support in peripheral rural towns and regions.

Keywords

  • Knowledge society
  • Rural area
  • Cultural change
  • Education- and knowledge-networks
  • Social capital
  • Spatial development
access type Open Access

Growing by whom? How urban development strategies deal with migration in Bremen and Leipzig

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 493 - 509

Abstract

Abstract

The article examines the urban development strategies of Bremen and Leipzig with regard to their dealing with migration. The key questions of the article are as follows: Which target groups of migrants prefer urban development policies in order to achieve growth goals? To what extent is there a change of perspective on migration from problems to potentials of urban development? Our empirical results show that both cities focus primarily on the immigration of young and highly skilled workers. Both cities also rely on the immigration of students and try to keep them after graduation. However, this orientation is difficult to put into practice, because in both cities the number of job opportunites for highly qualified people is limited. The importance of immigration from abroad, which is the most increasing growth segment, was initially less well perceived by both cities and has only gained more strategic importance in recent years. International immigration is simultaneously perceived as potential and problem in the urban development concepts of both cities. The article discusses the dilemmas of cities in dealing with migration. These include, in particular, the lack of control capacity in terms of migrant selection and recruitment, a "dual regime" between growth and integration policies, and often a selective focus on subgroups of actual immigration.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Strategic city planning
  • Regeneration
  • Bremen
  • Leipzig
access type Open Access

The role of arrival spaces in integrating immigrants. A critical literature review

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 511 - 524

Abstract

Abstract

The many new forms of migration and the increasing diversification of our societies are leaving their mark on urban spaces. In the arrival spaces featuring high levels of migrants, we tend also to find higher levels of poverty, irrespective of whether the households concerned have a migration background or not. Such neighbourhoods, often referred to in Germany as "migrant neighbourhoods" or "ethnic colonies", have long been a focus of geographic and sociological urban research. Closely connected with such neighbourhoods is the discussion over context effects and their potential to create disadvantage. The starting point for this paper is the observation that most research into such context effects highlights deficits, without taking sufficient account of those factors and mechanisms influencing migrants' access to societal resources. The article thus takes a look at available empirical and theoretical research, highlighting three current aspects influencing such access in arrival spaces: the increasingly multi-local contacts of these migrants, the specific concentration of migrant-related opportunity structures in certain sub-districts of our cities, and governance processes reacting to increasing diversity and constantly changing needs. Currently predominantly focused on ring-fenced neighbourhoods, the article aims to further integration research, calling for greater priority to be attached to looking at the day-to-day lives and practices of migrants. The characteristics and dynamics of arrival spaces illustrate the growing permeability of spatial and social structures, highlighting the need to think out of the neighbourhood box when discussing integration.

Keywords

  • Arrival spaces
  • Migration
  • (Super-)Diversity
  • Neighbourhood effects
  • Immigrant integration
  • Cross-local ties
  • Opportunity structures
access type Open Access

Social differentiation and increasing social heterogeneity in Leipzig, Germany, in light of daily life perceptions and policy-making

Published Online: 30 Oct 2019
Page range: 525 - 540

Abstract

Abstract

Social differentiation has developed to be one of the crucial characteristics of urban development in Eastern Germany's large cities, an issue that is increasingly reflected in daily life perceptions and policy-making. This development can be especially observed in those cities that, after a phase of shrinkage in the 1990s, have seen new growth during the last years. The focus is here on social differentiation that we understand as an increase in social inequalities, and on social heterogeneity that is understood as pluralization of cultural and religious identities, lifestyles and living environments. Set against this background, the paper discusses social differentiation and increasing heterogeneity in Leipzig with a focus on daily life perceptions by the residents and local policy development. It analyses how social difference and increasing heterogeneity have become an issue for daily routines and practices as well as for policy formulation and how both perspectives interact. The paper is based on a multi-dimensional understanding of heterogeneity including the socio-economic, demographic, lifestyle and ethnic-migration dimension. Spatially, both the total city and neighbourhood perspective are in focus. The paper concludes, among others, that social heterogeneity in its horizontal dimension is being recognised and accepted and that this is reflected by policy development as well. This does not apply in the same manner for increasing social inequalities. The example of Leipzig shows, furthermore, that there is a need for more differentiation in the local discourse with respect to the explicit recognition of horizontal difference, the need to counteract vertical social inequalities and the fact that out of the interaction/intersection of both dimensions, a bundle of new equivocalities and complexities emerge.

Keywords

  • Social differentiation
  • Social heterogeneity
  • Daily practices
  • Policy-making
  • Leipzig

Rezension / Book review

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