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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

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Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

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Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

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Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

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Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

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Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

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Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

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Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Neue Herausforderungen für eine integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Published Online: 19 Jul 2019
Page range: 315 - 317

Abstract

Open Access

Integration as a task of municipal policy. The exploration of an emerging field of local politics

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 319 - 331

Abstract

Abstract

Based on three empirical case studies, this paper discusses options of addressing social integration as a task of local authorities. It furthermore aims to provide a conceptual scheme for a systematic exploration of this field of local politics. The argumentation starts from the observation that many communities in Germany have taken promising attempts to establish a genuine integration policy at the local level in the wake of recent refugee immigration. Thereby, they bolster the often-heard catchword of 'social integration occurs at particular places' and, at the same time, support both local civil society and local economy in developing their integrative potential. However, the case studies have also shown that an 'integrative urban development' (policy) must not refrain its efforts to the very field of integration policy but should link this policy to further cross-cutting paradigms – i.e., the principles of recognition, backstopping, and social cohesion. Examples from the case studies illustrate how to pursue local integration policies that allow for these principles. Yet, it will always be a matter of framework conditions, experiences and distinct local discourses, which of the proposed strategies, instruments or measures apply.

Keywords

  • Integration at the place
  • Integrative/inclusive urban development
  • Local policies
  • Refugee migration
  • Essen
  • Altena
Open Access

Actors’ logics concerning municipal integration policies for refugees in North Rhine-Westphalian cities and small towns

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 333 - 347

Abstract

Abstract

With the significant increase in immigration of refugees since the mid-2010s, cities and municipalities are facing new challenges of social integration with their local policies on foreigners and migration. These challenges are handled through the interaction of various, in part new, local actors from the public sector (e.g. municipal administration, welfare organisations), the commercial sector (e.g. employers) and the civil society (e.g. voluntary initiatives). In this paper, the different logics of central actors involved in the integration processes are examined in order to show who creates and controls the local integration conditions under which preconditions. The study was conducted in two different local contexts, the city of Cologne and the district of Heinsberg, with the aim of highlighting differences and similarities in local governance. The results are based on 29 expert interviews with representatives of the city administrations, the civil society and experts of the state level who are involved in the integration process of refugees due to their professional or voluntary work. Different logics can be identified. Firstly, this applies to the relationship between state actors at the federal and state levels and local actors. Secondly, this also applies to the relationship between municipal and civil society actors. The spatial and situational contexts play a differentiating role.

Keywords

  • Refugees
  • Municipal integration policies
  • Governance
  • Cologne
  • District of Heinsberg
Open Access

The acceptance of refugees. A comparative study of six German neighbourhoods

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 349 - 366

Abstract

Abstract

In almost all German cities since 2011 accommodations for refugees were established in residential areas, often leading to protest among the residents of respective neighbourhoods. Our study examines the attitudes of residents towards refugees and accommodations for them in their housing area. We conducted face-to-face interviews with representative samples of residents in six such neighbourhoods in Hamburg, Cologne, and Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany, and obtained a total of 1,800 interviews. Based on hypotheses from prejudice theory and the contact hypothesis we study effects of the social status of the neighbourhood, neighbourhood social capital (collective efficacy), and individual characteristics on refugee discrimination. We find attitudes towards refugees and their accommodations to be predominantly positive, although differentiated in several ways. Discrimination is lower in higher social status neighbourhoods and decreases with years of schooling. Further, contact to refugees reduces prejudice and increases tolerance of larger shares of refugees in one's neighbourhood. In the final section we suggest, which type of neighbourhood is favourable for refugee accommodations.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Integration
  • Refugees
  • Contact hypothesis
  • Neighbourhoods
Open Access

No place for refugees? An empirical study of the exclusion of refugees citing the city of Bautzen (Germany) as an example

Published Online: 24 Apr 2019
Page range: 367 - 382

Abstract

Abstract

The paper discusses how it becomes common behaviour to exclude refugees in a middle-town. Therefore, an analytical model of hostile social spaces is formulated, which explains the exclusion of branded foreign groups. Precondition is a change in what is considered as a normal social behaviour. Through this, the newly developed collective norms of a local society justify the exclusion of specific groups such as refugees. Using Bautzen (Germany) as an example, the local discussion about refugees as well as their perception is debated. Therefore, the discourse about refugees and violence against them is analysed in newspaper articles as well as in minutes of political debates. In the center of the analysis are 106 semi-structured interviews with various social groups. So, the change of normality as well as the contextual effect, operationalized as the exclusion of refugees, are analysed. The results show a change of what is looked at as normal as well as that the exclusion of refugees is justified and not sanctioned in wide parts of the local society. Refugees report of exclusion and violence in different arenas like educational institutions, public spaces or the public transport network. The paper ends concluding additional need for research defining which sociostructural dynamics are preconditions for the developing of hostile places.

Keywords

  • Refugees
  • Context effects
  • Urban sociology
  • Conflict
  • Normality
  • Bautzen
Open Access

Contexts of children’s well-being. Integrating urban development by the municipal small-scale monitoring instrument UWE

Published Online: 01 Jun 2019
Page range: 383 - 400

Abstract

Abstract

This article presents results of a pilot-study, which developed a monitoring-instrument for measuring well-being of children and young people in a municipal permanent observation and as evaluation tool. Integrated urban development faces the challenge to absorb negative consequences at the development of children by residential and educational segregation. At the same time, in cities there is a lack of systematic available small-scale data about children in the middle years. The instrument uses human resources as necessary potential for society and measures areas of children’s development strongly linked to well-being and the influence by the socio-spatial contexts: family, school and living environment. A simultaneous testing of these contexts allows options of intervention, which can be used resource-specific.

Keywords

  • Children’s well-being
  • Socio-spatial context
  • Family
  • School
  • Living environment
  • Monitoring instrument
Open Access

Neighbourhood Life Chances. Local Strategies of Needs Fulfilment and Individual Resources

Published Online: 13 Jun 2019
Page range: 401 - 415

Abstract

Abstract

In order to capture individual life chances and their spatial relations, the paper expands the neighbourhood effects research by referring to the capability approach. We conceptualise life chances as the opportunities and freedom to fulfil human needs, which is determined by individual resources. The opportunities and freedoms depend on the life circumstances and underly profound changes during life course, with corresponding changes of the neighbourhoods’ significance for life chances. Instead of “disadvantaged neighbourhoods” we focus on disadvantaged life circumstances in neighbourhoods.

Keywords

  • Neighbourhood effects
  • Socio-spatial disadvantages
  • Life chances
  • Resources
  • Needs
Open Access

Neighbourhood-based social integration. The importance of the local context for different forms of resource transfer

Published Online: 30 Aug 2019
Page range: 417 - 434

Abstract

Abstract

Due to their lack of financial resources, poor residents of deprived neighbourhoods are very much reliant on support and assistance from their personal networks. Studies refer to the key importance of neighbourhood contacts transcending social boundaries to promote upward social mobility. Based on a mix of quantitative and qualitative findings, this paper looks at the importance of social mix within a person’s neighbourhood and immediate surroundings for transferring different kinds of resources. The results show that even residents of deprived neighbourhoods can call on a well-developed support network to deal with everyday problems. The contribution also shows that network contacts to people endowed with more resources are no guarantee for the upward social mobility of the less well endowed. Indeed, it would seem that ‘getting-ahead’ resources are also accessible via their homogeneous networks. Much more to the point, the immediate surroundings turn out to be an important spatial context for contacts and resource transfers, especially for families with children.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Sozial benachteiligte Quartiere
  • Ressourcentransfer
  • persönliche Netzwerke
  • nähere Wohnumgebung
  • soziale Mischung

Rezension / Book review

Open Access

Encounters in Planning Thought. 16 Autobiographical Essays from Key Thinkers in Spatial Planning

Published Online: 04 Jun 2019
Page range: 435 - 439

Abstract

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Neue Herausforderungen für eine integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Published Online: 19 Jul 2019
Page range: 315 - 317

Abstract

Open Access

Integration as a task of municipal policy. The exploration of an emerging field of local politics

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 319 - 331

Abstract

Abstract

Based on three empirical case studies, this paper discusses options of addressing social integration as a task of local authorities. It furthermore aims to provide a conceptual scheme for a systematic exploration of this field of local politics. The argumentation starts from the observation that many communities in Germany have taken promising attempts to establish a genuine integration policy at the local level in the wake of recent refugee immigration. Thereby, they bolster the often-heard catchword of 'social integration occurs at particular places' and, at the same time, support both local civil society and local economy in developing their integrative potential. However, the case studies have also shown that an 'integrative urban development' (policy) must not refrain its efforts to the very field of integration policy but should link this policy to further cross-cutting paradigms – i.e., the principles of recognition, backstopping, and social cohesion. Examples from the case studies illustrate how to pursue local integration policies that allow for these principles. Yet, it will always be a matter of framework conditions, experiences and distinct local discourses, which of the proposed strategies, instruments or measures apply.

Keywords

  • Integration at the place
  • Integrative/inclusive urban development
  • Local policies
  • Refugee migration
  • Essen
  • Altena
Open Access

Actors’ logics concerning municipal integration policies for refugees in North Rhine-Westphalian cities and small towns

Published Online: 06 Aug 2019
Page range: 333 - 347

Abstract

Abstract

With the significant increase in immigration of refugees since the mid-2010s, cities and municipalities are facing new challenges of social integration with their local policies on foreigners and migration. These challenges are handled through the interaction of various, in part new, local actors from the public sector (e.g. municipal administration, welfare organisations), the commercial sector (e.g. employers) and the civil society (e.g. voluntary initiatives). In this paper, the different logics of central actors involved in the integration processes are examined in order to show who creates and controls the local integration conditions under which preconditions. The study was conducted in two different local contexts, the city of Cologne and the district of Heinsberg, with the aim of highlighting differences and similarities in local governance. The results are based on 29 expert interviews with representatives of the city administrations, the civil society and experts of the state level who are involved in the integration process of refugees due to their professional or voluntary work. Different logics can be identified. Firstly, this applies to the relationship between state actors at the federal and state levels and local actors. Secondly, this also applies to the relationship between municipal and civil society actors. The spatial and situational contexts play a differentiating role.

Keywords

  • Refugees
  • Municipal integration policies
  • Governance
  • Cologne
  • District of Heinsberg
Open Access

The acceptance of refugees. A comparative study of six German neighbourhoods

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 349 - 366

Abstract

Abstract

In almost all German cities since 2011 accommodations for refugees were established in residential areas, often leading to protest among the residents of respective neighbourhoods. Our study examines the attitudes of residents towards refugees and accommodations for them in their housing area. We conducted face-to-face interviews with representative samples of residents in six such neighbourhoods in Hamburg, Cologne, and Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany, and obtained a total of 1,800 interviews. Based on hypotheses from prejudice theory and the contact hypothesis we study effects of the social status of the neighbourhood, neighbourhood social capital (collective efficacy), and individual characteristics on refugee discrimination. We find attitudes towards refugees and their accommodations to be predominantly positive, although differentiated in several ways. Discrimination is lower in higher social status neighbourhoods and decreases with years of schooling. Further, contact to refugees reduces prejudice and increases tolerance of larger shares of refugees in one's neighbourhood. In the final section we suggest, which type of neighbourhood is favourable for refugee accommodations.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Integration
  • Refugees
  • Contact hypothesis
  • Neighbourhoods
Open Access

No place for refugees? An empirical study of the exclusion of refugees citing the city of Bautzen (Germany) as an example

Published Online: 24 Apr 2019
Page range: 367 - 382

Abstract

Abstract

The paper discusses how it becomes common behaviour to exclude refugees in a middle-town. Therefore, an analytical model of hostile social spaces is formulated, which explains the exclusion of branded foreign groups. Precondition is a change in what is considered as a normal social behaviour. Through this, the newly developed collective norms of a local society justify the exclusion of specific groups such as refugees. Using Bautzen (Germany) as an example, the local discussion about refugees as well as their perception is debated. Therefore, the discourse about refugees and violence against them is analysed in newspaper articles as well as in minutes of political debates. In the center of the analysis are 106 semi-structured interviews with various social groups. So, the change of normality as well as the contextual effect, operationalized as the exclusion of refugees, are analysed. The results show a change of what is looked at as normal as well as that the exclusion of refugees is justified and not sanctioned in wide parts of the local society. Refugees report of exclusion and violence in different arenas like educational institutions, public spaces or the public transport network. The paper ends concluding additional need for research defining which sociostructural dynamics are preconditions for the developing of hostile places.

Keywords

  • Refugees
  • Context effects
  • Urban sociology
  • Conflict
  • Normality
  • Bautzen
Open Access

Contexts of children’s well-being. Integrating urban development by the municipal small-scale monitoring instrument UWE

Published Online: 01 Jun 2019
Page range: 383 - 400

Abstract

Abstract

This article presents results of a pilot-study, which developed a monitoring-instrument for measuring well-being of children and young people in a municipal permanent observation and as evaluation tool. Integrated urban development faces the challenge to absorb negative consequences at the development of children by residential and educational segregation. At the same time, in cities there is a lack of systematic available small-scale data about children in the middle years. The instrument uses human resources as necessary potential for society and measures areas of children’s development strongly linked to well-being and the influence by the socio-spatial contexts: family, school and living environment. A simultaneous testing of these contexts allows options of intervention, which can be used resource-specific.

Keywords

  • Children’s well-being
  • Socio-spatial context
  • Family
  • School
  • Living environment
  • Monitoring instrument
Open Access

Neighbourhood Life Chances. Local Strategies of Needs Fulfilment and Individual Resources

Published Online: 13 Jun 2019
Page range: 401 - 415

Abstract

Abstract

In order to capture individual life chances and their spatial relations, the paper expands the neighbourhood effects research by referring to the capability approach. We conceptualise life chances as the opportunities and freedom to fulfil human needs, which is determined by individual resources. The opportunities and freedoms depend on the life circumstances and underly profound changes during life course, with corresponding changes of the neighbourhoods’ significance for life chances. Instead of “disadvantaged neighbourhoods” we focus on disadvantaged life circumstances in neighbourhoods.

Keywords

  • Neighbourhood effects
  • Socio-spatial disadvantages
  • Life chances
  • Resources
  • Needs
Open Access

Neighbourhood-based social integration. The importance of the local context for different forms of resource transfer

Published Online: 30 Aug 2019
Page range: 417 - 434

Abstract

Abstract

Due to their lack of financial resources, poor residents of deprived neighbourhoods are very much reliant on support and assistance from their personal networks. Studies refer to the key importance of neighbourhood contacts transcending social boundaries to promote upward social mobility. Based on a mix of quantitative and qualitative findings, this paper looks at the importance of social mix within a person’s neighbourhood and immediate surroundings for transferring different kinds of resources. The results show that even residents of deprived neighbourhoods can call on a well-developed support network to deal with everyday problems. The contribution also shows that network contacts to people endowed with more resources are no guarantee for the upward social mobility of the less well endowed. Indeed, it would seem that ‘getting-ahead’ resources are also accessible via their homogeneous networks. Much more to the point, the immediate surroundings turn out to be an important spatial context for contacts and resource transfers, especially for families with children.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Sozial benachteiligte Quartiere
  • Ressourcentransfer
  • persönliche Netzwerke
  • nähere Wohnumgebung
  • soziale Mischung

Rezension / Book review

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