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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

How do Topics Emerge in Planning Studies?

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 225 - 240

Abstract

Abstract

To which topics planning studies attach attention is subject to dynamic change. Issues such as sustainability, socially integrative cities or metropolitan regions played prominent roles at different times. Against this background, it is noteworthy that within planning studies so far only few studies focus on the fundamental question of why certain topics arise at a certain time in planning research and later subside again. There are no models that could explain why a planning topic receives particular attention. While there is no doubt that topics as those mentioned above are fundamental for planning thought, we cannot explain the timing and causation of their emergence on top of the agenda. This article explores the question of how attention is constituted and developed for a topic in planning studies. Building on political science and communication sociology approaches, an issue-attention cycle is conceptualized as the socially determined development process of an issue. Using the cases of 'climate change' and 'shrinking cities', issue-attention cycles in planning studies are examined exemplarily on the basis of a phase heuristic. Taking a sociology of science perspective, orientations of actions by planning scholars are revealed. A network analysis identifies and explores key actors, their publications, and crucial events for the development of both topics. In addition, a lexicometric discourse analysis examines contents and conceptual contexts. Finally, a qualitative survey explores how and why scientists pick certain topics as part of their individual research biographies. The article concludes with a plea to consider issue-attention cycles as an integral part of planning studies since they strongly affect the prioritization of problems, aims and policies within the scientific realm and beyond.

Keywords

  • Issue-attention cycles
  • Agenda setting
  • Planning studies
  • Sociology of science
  • Institutional analysis
  • Network analysis
  • Discourse analysis
  • Shrinking cities
  • Climate change
access type Open Access

Social-Movement Pattern Analysis: New Digital Methods to Analyse Activity Space in Urban Areas

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 241 - 255

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, we introduce a research approach which wants to be understood as a proposal for a new version of urban sociological and geographical activity-space research. The methodological approach is illustrated by an explorative study with students from Koblenz (Germany). According to the mixed-methods approach "Explanatory Sequential Design", we combine quantitative and qualitative survey and evaluation procedures. Thereby, we collect student movement data with the help of a smartphone app in order to localise student "hotspots". Additionally, we link them to information about the students' individual lifestyles so as to achieve a differentiation of their movement sequences (movement patterns). Finally, we complement the collected data with qualitative observations of the localised "hotspots" in order to develop a closer understanding of the "Why?" of the movement patterns. Without raising a claim for representativeness, our results show that the movement patterns and identified localities can be described along lifestyle-specific differentiation criteria. When the respective locations are regarded more closely, indications for a close fit between the theoretically implicated assumptions regarding lifestyle types and spatial relationships on the one hand and the sought out localities on the other hand can be identified.

Keywords

  • Activity space research
  • Movement patterns
  • Mixed methods
  • GPS-tracking
  • Lifestyle
access type Open Access

Gentrification of peri-urban spaces in France – the surroundings of Nancy

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 257 - 271

Abstract

Abstract

The process of gentrification in the peri-urban districts of French cities has scarcely been touched upon in recent research, which has hitherto seen the phenomenon as typically associated with core urban areas. The tendency has been to view the periphery through the lens of the social crisis of the banlieues. In contrast, the present article focuses on gentrification in the metropolitan area of Nancy (Grand Est region) as a development that also plays a role in municipalities around major cities and especially around regional metropolitan centres. Starting with a survey of current research approaches, the article first pinpoints some gaps and methodological imbalances that need to be tackled, before embarking on the case study of peri-urban Nancy. Statistical data and empirical surveys in the form of qualitative interviews indicate how Nancy's peri-urban districts have developed a logic of separation, exclusion and social decoupling – typical features of gentrification – particularly in connection with the construction of new single-family houses as a supplement to existing residential stock. Key questions here concern individual motives for choosing a particular residential location, and the creeping "segregation from above" that accompanies this process. The image of France's peri-urban spaces that arises from this study stands in explicit contrast to the received, markedly negative connotations of the "urban periphery".

Keywords

  • Peri-urban spaces
  • peri-urban gentrification
  • heterogenization
  • metropolitan area of Nancy (Lorraine)
  • qualitative approach
access type Open Access

Structure of housing vacancy in Germany. A Typology of Attributes of the German Housing Census 2011 in German Municipalities

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 273 - 290

Abstract

Abstract

The vacancy rate is a key indicator of housing market monitoring and is used to assess housing market situations. In Germany, the vacancy rates of cities and rural areas vary widely, which is due to the different characteristics of the housing stock e.g. in terms of building age or flat size. Up to now, there are hardly systematic analyses of the vacancy structure which capture the full variation of vacancy patterns. Against this background the paper aims at detecting the different structure of vacancies for German municipalities. Therefore, small-scale data from the Building and Housing Census (GWZ) 2011 is used, covering the whole country. The vacancy data can be differentiated according to 50 characteristics which are checked against their explanatory power for the vacancy rate. Based on this, spatial vacancy types are built that reflect the vacancy structure in Germany at the municipal level. The paper underlines that building age as well as building and flat size have the highest explanation power. However, there are clear differences between Eastern and Western Germany, for example with regard to ownership. The typology of municipalities sharpens and spatially locates these findings. In addition to east-west and urban-rural differences there are types of vacancy structure that occur throughout Germany. The paper presents an analysis which helps to differentiate, evaluate and classify vacancy structures. The results allow to derive evidences for urban planning or housing policy measures as well as to qualify the housing monitoring at the federal level.

Keywords

  • Housing vacancy
  • Vacancy structure
  • Housing market monitoring
  • Building and housing census (GWZ)
  • Typology of municipalities
access type Open Access

Out of sight, out of mind?! Stakeholder-specific evaluation and acceptance of underground HVDC cables

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 291 - 306

Abstract

Abstract

A successful energy turnaround – the so-called Energiewende – requires the reinforcement and expansion of the electricity grid. In late 2015, the German government approved a law prioritizing the use of underground cables over overhead lines near residential areas in order to speed up the grid expansion and to minimize local resistances. This paper deals with the perception and acceptance of concerned parties regarding an underground cable project planned in a rural area (Rheinisches Braunkohlerevier). By means of qualitative interviews the perspectives of local farmers and residents on the Energiewende, acceptance and evaluation of the grid expansion in general as well as the planned underground cable project and its ancillary facilities which are to be implemented in the living environment of the two affected parties were investigated and compared. The results show group-related similarities and differences. Overall, both groups were found to have a positive attitude towards the Energiewende and a preference for underground cables compared to overhead lines. However, criticism towards both issues was also voiced. Despite the general preference for underground cables, local residents evaluate the particular underground cable project in the investigated region rather neutral, partly indifferent, and in some aspects critical. In contrast, the attitude of local farmers is rather critical due to a multitude of perceived disadvantages, which partially lead to (active) acts of resistance that could slow down the project. It becomes obvious that regional site characteristics, spatio-temporal processes, habit-forming effects as well as experience and knowledge play a substantial role when evaluating the planned underground cables and that these aspects should be considered when planning grid infrastructure projects.

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Grid expansion
  • Underground cables
  • Energy turnaround
  • Infrastructure project
  • Energy transition

Rezension / Book review

access type Open Access

Planung für gesundheitsfördernde Städte

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 307 - 309

Abstract

access type Open Access

Geographies of the University

Published Online: 29 Apr 2019
Page range: 311 - 314

Abstract

7 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

How do Topics Emerge in Planning Studies?

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 225 - 240

Abstract

Abstract

To which topics planning studies attach attention is subject to dynamic change. Issues such as sustainability, socially integrative cities or metropolitan regions played prominent roles at different times. Against this background, it is noteworthy that within planning studies so far only few studies focus on the fundamental question of why certain topics arise at a certain time in planning research and later subside again. There are no models that could explain why a planning topic receives particular attention. While there is no doubt that topics as those mentioned above are fundamental for planning thought, we cannot explain the timing and causation of their emergence on top of the agenda. This article explores the question of how attention is constituted and developed for a topic in planning studies. Building on political science and communication sociology approaches, an issue-attention cycle is conceptualized as the socially determined development process of an issue. Using the cases of 'climate change' and 'shrinking cities', issue-attention cycles in planning studies are examined exemplarily on the basis of a phase heuristic. Taking a sociology of science perspective, orientations of actions by planning scholars are revealed. A network analysis identifies and explores key actors, their publications, and crucial events for the development of both topics. In addition, a lexicometric discourse analysis examines contents and conceptual contexts. Finally, a qualitative survey explores how and why scientists pick certain topics as part of their individual research biographies. The article concludes with a plea to consider issue-attention cycles as an integral part of planning studies since they strongly affect the prioritization of problems, aims and policies within the scientific realm and beyond.

Keywords

  • Issue-attention cycles
  • Agenda setting
  • Planning studies
  • Sociology of science
  • Institutional analysis
  • Network analysis
  • Discourse analysis
  • Shrinking cities
  • Climate change
access type Open Access

Social-Movement Pattern Analysis: New Digital Methods to Analyse Activity Space in Urban Areas

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 241 - 255

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, we introduce a research approach which wants to be understood as a proposal for a new version of urban sociological and geographical activity-space research. The methodological approach is illustrated by an explorative study with students from Koblenz (Germany). According to the mixed-methods approach "Explanatory Sequential Design", we combine quantitative and qualitative survey and evaluation procedures. Thereby, we collect student movement data with the help of a smartphone app in order to localise student "hotspots". Additionally, we link them to information about the students' individual lifestyles so as to achieve a differentiation of their movement sequences (movement patterns). Finally, we complement the collected data with qualitative observations of the localised "hotspots" in order to develop a closer understanding of the "Why?" of the movement patterns. Without raising a claim for representativeness, our results show that the movement patterns and identified localities can be described along lifestyle-specific differentiation criteria. When the respective locations are regarded more closely, indications for a close fit between the theoretically implicated assumptions regarding lifestyle types and spatial relationships on the one hand and the sought out localities on the other hand can be identified.

Keywords

  • Activity space research
  • Movement patterns
  • Mixed methods
  • GPS-tracking
  • Lifestyle
access type Open Access

Gentrification of peri-urban spaces in France – the surroundings of Nancy

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 257 - 271

Abstract

Abstract

The process of gentrification in the peri-urban districts of French cities has scarcely been touched upon in recent research, which has hitherto seen the phenomenon as typically associated with core urban areas. The tendency has been to view the periphery through the lens of the social crisis of the banlieues. In contrast, the present article focuses on gentrification in the metropolitan area of Nancy (Grand Est region) as a development that also plays a role in municipalities around major cities and especially around regional metropolitan centres. Starting with a survey of current research approaches, the article first pinpoints some gaps and methodological imbalances that need to be tackled, before embarking on the case study of peri-urban Nancy. Statistical data and empirical surveys in the form of qualitative interviews indicate how Nancy's peri-urban districts have developed a logic of separation, exclusion and social decoupling – typical features of gentrification – particularly in connection with the construction of new single-family houses as a supplement to existing residential stock. Key questions here concern individual motives for choosing a particular residential location, and the creeping "segregation from above" that accompanies this process. The image of France's peri-urban spaces that arises from this study stands in explicit contrast to the received, markedly negative connotations of the "urban periphery".

Keywords

  • Peri-urban spaces
  • peri-urban gentrification
  • heterogenization
  • metropolitan area of Nancy (Lorraine)
  • qualitative approach
access type Open Access

Structure of housing vacancy in Germany. A Typology of Attributes of the German Housing Census 2011 in German Municipalities

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 273 - 290

Abstract

Abstract

The vacancy rate is a key indicator of housing market monitoring and is used to assess housing market situations. In Germany, the vacancy rates of cities and rural areas vary widely, which is due to the different characteristics of the housing stock e.g. in terms of building age or flat size. Up to now, there are hardly systematic analyses of the vacancy structure which capture the full variation of vacancy patterns. Against this background the paper aims at detecting the different structure of vacancies for German municipalities. Therefore, small-scale data from the Building and Housing Census (GWZ) 2011 is used, covering the whole country. The vacancy data can be differentiated according to 50 characteristics which are checked against their explanatory power for the vacancy rate. Based on this, spatial vacancy types are built that reflect the vacancy structure in Germany at the municipal level. The paper underlines that building age as well as building and flat size have the highest explanation power. However, there are clear differences between Eastern and Western Germany, for example with regard to ownership. The typology of municipalities sharpens and spatially locates these findings. In addition to east-west and urban-rural differences there are types of vacancy structure that occur throughout Germany. The paper presents an analysis which helps to differentiate, evaluate and classify vacancy structures. The results allow to derive evidences for urban planning or housing policy measures as well as to qualify the housing monitoring at the federal level.

Keywords

  • Housing vacancy
  • Vacancy structure
  • Housing market monitoring
  • Building and housing census (GWZ)
  • Typology of municipalities
access type Open Access

Out of sight, out of mind?! Stakeholder-specific evaluation and acceptance of underground HVDC cables

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 291 - 306

Abstract

Abstract

A successful energy turnaround – the so-called Energiewende – requires the reinforcement and expansion of the electricity grid. In late 2015, the German government approved a law prioritizing the use of underground cables over overhead lines near residential areas in order to speed up the grid expansion and to minimize local resistances. This paper deals with the perception and acceptance of concerned parties regarding an underground cable project planned in a rural area (Rheinisches Braunkohlerevier). By means of qualitative interviews the perspectives of local farmers and residents on the Energiewende, acceptance and evaluation of the grid expansion in general as well as the planned underground cable project and its ancillary facilities which are to be implemented in the living environment of the two affected parties were investigated and compared. The results show group-related similarities and differences. Overall, both groups were found to have a positive attitude towards the Energiewende and a preference for underground cables compared to overhead lines. However, criticism towards both issues was also voiced. Despite the general preference for underground cables, local residents evaluate the particular underground cable project in the investigated region rather neutral, partly indifferent, and in some aspects critical. In contrast, the attitude of local farmers is rather critical due to a multitude of perceived disadvantages, which partially lead to (active) acts of resistance that could slow down the project. It becomes obvious that regional site characteristics, spatio-temporal processes, habit-forming effects as well as experience and knowledge play a substantial role when evaluating the planned underground cables and that these aspects should be considered when planning grid infrastructure projects.

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Grid expansion
  • Underground cables
  • Energy turnaround
  • Infrastructure project
  • Energy transition

Rezension / Book review

access type Open Access

Planung für gesundheitsfördernde Städte

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 307 - 309

Abstract

access type Open Access

Geographies of the University

Published Online: 29 Apr 2019
Page range: 311 - 314

Abstract

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