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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

11 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Planning and transition – on role interpretations and self-conceptions

Published Online: 30 Apr 2019
Page range: 107 - 113

Abstract

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Urban planning as a discipline. Planner's everyday routines and self-conceptions

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 115 - 130

Abstract

Abstract

The article aims to reflect on the everyday planning practice to approach the so-called core of urban planning as a discipline and, thereby, to identify the implications for the professional self-conceptions of planners. Based on a cross-sectional survey of planners in public administration in German middle-size cities, it can be stated that urban planning commands specific substantial key aspects and the including expert knowledge. But urban planning fails to convey its societal importance and to crystallize the identity of planning. Although urban planners ensure that the procedures run as smoothly as possible and the projects are legally secure, the formalisation of urban planning also limits the scope for planners to make decisions and can be seen as a reason why conceptual approaches to responsible urban development are rarely found. This is also reflected in the self-understanding and role perceptions of planners, who see themselves more as project and process managers than as innovators or initiators. In addition, everyday professional life is increasingly determined by interdisciplinary working methods and specialist knowledge, which is another characteristic of urban planning. At the same time, however, the pronounced interdisciplinarity is also the greatest weakness of urban planning, since the multitude of approaches, forms of knowledge and methods means that there is no distinct, identifiable core of planning. However, a joint understanding on this seems to be crucial to provide planners with a new orientation how to achieve sustainable urban development by using proactive, strategic and cooperative planning strategies.

Keywords

  • Urban planning
  • Discipline
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Self-conceptions
  • Role models
Open Access

Planning for practices. Everyday issues in planning considerations using urban green as an example

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 131 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

Discourses in planning theory and in society question the role of planning as decision makers for urban development. Protests of citizens show that their concerns often find too little attention in questions of developing cities. In consequence, a need for rethinking the practice of urban planning becomes apparent. Therefore, it is required to implement an understanding of planning as an integrative process, which is informed by the needs of the people living in the city. At the same time, methods and concepts are needed to identify the heterogeneous concerns of the citizens and to bring them into the planning process. In the first part, the paper presents an idea of citizen-oriented planning practice. In the second part, a methodological framework shows how the differentiated needs of people can be identified and abstracted as a framework which serves as an orientation for decision-making in planning processes. Therefore, the paper refers to approaches of practice theory and focusses on everyday productions of space as a heuristic tool for identifying the needs of people practicing their everyday life. For making it more concrete, the concept is adapted to questions of planning the urban green. Empirical findings show how urban green typically gets relevant in people's practices of everyday life and how planning practice can refer to these findings seeking for a citizen driven urban development.

Keywords

  • Practices
  • Production of space
  • Participation
  • Walking interview
  • Urban green
  • Civic involvement
Open Access

Planung am Meer: Planungspraktiken an der deutschen Nordseeküste im Wandel

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 147 - 164

Abstract

Abstract

Coastal and marine areas represent an increasingly important and relevant action space for spatial planning. However, to a large extent marine (or maritime) spatial planning has emerged separately from terrestrial spatial planning, constituting its own epistemic community. In particular, previous studies indicate that Marine Spatial Planning often follows an expert-driven resource management rationale focused on sea-use regulation. This paper examines practices of Marine Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal Zone Management at the German North Sea coast. The paper focuses in particular on the engagement of spatial planners with these practices and their perception of their role therein. We seek to understand what form spatial planning at the coast and at sea currently takes and how this might develop in the future in response to current and anticipated policy developments. We argue for the necessity of a communicative, cross-sectoral approach to spatial planning at sea, providing a spatial vision for the future that extends from the Exclusive Economic Zone to encompass both the coastal waters of the federal states and the land-sea interface in a substantive manner.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Integriertes Küstenzonenmanagement
  • Maritime Raumordnung
  • Planungsparadigmen, Niedersachsen
  • Schleswig-Holstein
Open Access

Professional identities of spatial planners at regional level in the context of wind energy developments: a poststructuralist perspective

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 165 - 180

Abstract

Abstract

If one wants to understand spatial planning, then one needs to know about the self-conceptions and professional identities of the key actors. So far, this has hardly been the object of scientific inquiries in Germany. This paper relies on a research design that analyses professional identities as resulting from the interplay of external discursive interpellations and own practices of identity work. It examines the roles, which are assigned to spatial planners at regional level in Germany, and how planners themselves perceive and shape their professional identities. The empirical part uses textual analyses and autobiographic narrative interviews to elucidate subject positions in published documents. It furthermore shows, which discursive interpellations spatial planners see themselves exposed to, which standards and norms they define for their professional work, which techniques of the self they employ und which tensions they perceive in this regard. The results tie in with international research on planners' roles and identities. The findings call on planning practitioners to reflect upon individual practices and existing opportunities of identity work.

Keywords

  • Spatial planners
  • Wind energy
  • Subjectivation
  • Subject positions
  • Subjectification
  • Techniques of the self
Open Access

Die subjektive Destitution des Planers: zu einer hysterisch-analytischen Triade von Planungstheorie, Forschung und Praxis

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 181 - 198

Abstract

Abstract

In this article, I set out different relationships between planning theory, research and practice, drawing on Lacan's "production of four discourses". I argue that each element of the planning theory-research-practice 'triad' acts as the discursive 'agent' and gives rise to particular kinds of 'subject-planner' (the 'master', the 'expert', the 'idealistic' and the 'pragmatic') with specific ideological upshots ('hidden' big other, 'feigned' big other, hysteria and subjective destitution). Primarily a theoretical discussion, the article is also partially underpinned by my own practical experience in planning. While Lacanian psychoanalytical theory has already entered the planning field, its deployment has been mostly centred on deconstructing both planning decision-making processes and the mediation of planners in creating and implementing plans. Hence, the attempt here is to look in more depth at the 'ambivalent' role of the planner as well as to bring in 'planning research', as a key, somewhat occluded, element within the discussion on bridging planning theory and practice. Further, in the literature there seems to be a sort of omnipresent assumption that 'valid' reflection on planning can only come from the 'outside', which in turn perpetuates the role of the academic researcher simply trying to decode and analyse what the practitioner does (or tries to do). Critical impressions from those 'out there', 'on the job', are still missing. They, far from mere anecdotic accounts, ought to comprise self-inflicted criticism triggered by a sense of discomfort with what's being done – by the hysterical question of "why am I a planner?" and "why I am doing this or that?"

Keywords

  • Planning theory
  • psychoanalytical theory
  • Lacan
  • discourse
  • uncertainty
Open Access

Planning in uncharted waters: spatial transformations, planning transitions and role-reflexive planning

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 199 - 211

Abstract

Abstract

For planners, processes of complex spatial transformations today are comparable to uncharted land and an uncertain voyage. Many possible role images overlap and contrast to traditional and established ways of thinking and acting. The focus here is on navigating instead of controlling, about supporting instead of enforcing. Planning lacks tools to think and act when facing uncertainty. This paper proposes role-reflexive planning as an educational and experimental approach to thinking through different potentialities. It offers groundwork from the boundary between planning and transition studies, using role-based ideas as a bridge. It offers an overview about different roles that are relevant to working towards transformations as spatial planners. It develops an account of role-reflexive planning that connects between contexts, actions and back to individual modes of behaviour in planning processes. As a basis, this paper condenses experiences of a role-playing pilot workshop and discussions about potential elements of a transition towards 'post-growth planning'. It outlines how role-playing challenges the individual roles of actors beyond the game situations themselves. Conceptual ideas foster a renewed role-based debate on thinking and acting in the face of uncertainty and ways to navigate through the stormy waters of transformation.

Keywords

  • Role of planners
  • role reflection
  • role-based approach

Rezension / Book review

Open Access

Grenzen. Theoretische, konzeptionelle und praxisbezogene Fragestellungen zu Grenzen und deren Überschreitungen

Published Online: 16 Mar 2019
Page range: 213 - 214

Abstract

Open Access

Gerber, Jean-David; Hartmann, Thomas; Hengstermann, Andreas (Hrsg.) (2018)

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 215 - 218

Abstract

Open Access

Zur Steuerungskraft der Raumordnungsplanung. Am Beispiel akzeptanzrelevanter Konflikte der Windenergieplanung

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 219 - 220

Abstract

Open Access

Umweltbezogene Gerechtigkeit. Anforderungen an eine zukunftsweisende Stadtplanung

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 221 - 223

Abstract

11 Articles

Editorial

Beitrag / Article

Open Access

Urban planning as a discipline. Planner's everyday routines and self-conceptions

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 115 - 130

Abstract

Abstract

The article aims to reflect on the everyday planning practice to approach the so-called core of urban planning as a discipline and, thereby, to identify the implications for the professional self-conceptions of planners. Based on a cross-sectional survey of planners in public administration in German middle-size cities, it can be stated that urban planning commands specific substantial key aspects and the including expert knowledge. But urban planning fails to convey its societal importance and to crystallize the identity of planning. Although urban planners ensure that the procedures run as smoothly as possible and the projects are legally secure, the formalisation of urban planning also limits the scope for planners to make decisions and can be seen as a reason why conceptual approaches to responsible urban development are rarely found. This is also reflected in the self-understanding and role perceptions of planners, who see themselves more as project and process managers than as innovators or initiators. In addition, everyday professional life is increasingly determined by interdisciplinary working methods and specialist knowledge, which is another characteristic of urban planning. At the same time, however, the pronounced interdisciplinarity is also the greatest weakness of urban planning, since the multitude of approaches, forms of knowledge and methods means that there is no distinct, identifiable core of planning. However, a joint understanding on this seems to be crucial to provide planners with a new orientation how to achieve sustainable urban development by using proactive, strategic and cooperative planning strategies.

Keywords

  • Urban planning
  • Discipline
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Self-conceptions
  • Role models
Open Access

Planning for practices. Everyday issues in planning considerations using urban green as an example

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 131 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

Discourses in planning theory and in society question the role of planning as decision makers for urban development. Protests of citizens show that their concerns often find too little attention in questions of developing cities. In consequence, a need for rethinking the practice of urban planning becomes apparent. Therefore, it is required to implement an understanding of planning as an integrative process, which is informed by the needs of the people living in the city. At the same time, methods and concepts are needed to identify the heterogeneous concerns of the citizens and to bring them into the planning process. In the first part, the paper presents an idea of citizen-oriented planning practice. In the second part, a methodological framework shows how the differentiated needs of people can be identified and abstracted as a framework which serves as an orientation for decision-making in planning processes. Therefore, the paper refers to approaches of practice theory and focusses on everyday productions of space as a heuristic tool for identifying the needs of people practicing their everyday life. For making it more concrete, the concept is adapted to questions of planning the urban green. Empirical findings show how urban green typically gets relevant in people's practices of everyday life and how planning practice can refer to these findings seeking for a citizen driven urban development.

Keywords

  • Practices
  • Production of space
  • Participation
  • Walking interview
  • Urban green
  • Civic involvement
Open Access

Planung am Meer: Planungspraktiken an der deutschen Nordseeküste im Wandel

Published Online: 05 Apr 2019
Page range: 147 - 164

Abstract

Abstract

Coastal and marine areas represent an increasingly important and relevant action space for spatial planning. However, to a large extent marine (or maritime) spatial planning has emerged separately from terrestrial spatial planning, constituting its own epistemic community. In particular, previous studies indicate that Marine Spatial Planning often follows an expert-driven resource management rationale focused on sea-use regulation. This paper examines practices of Marine Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal Zone Management at the German North Sea coast. The paper focuses in particular on the engagement of spatial planners with these practices and their perception of their role therein. We seek to understand what form spatial planning at the coast and at sea currently takes and how this might develop in the future in response to current and anticipated policy developments. We argue for the necessity of a communicative, cross-sectoral approach to spatial planning at sea, providing a spatial vision for the future that extends from the Exclusive Economic Zone to encompass both the coastal waters of the federal states and the land-sea interface in a substantive manner.

Schlüsselwörter

  • Integriertes Küstenzonenmanagement
  • Maritime Raumordnung
  • Planungsparadigmen, Niedersachsen
  • Schleswig-Holstein
Open Access

Professional identities of spatial planners at regional level in the context of wind energy developments: a poststructuralist perspective

Published Online: 09 Apr 2019
Page range: 165 - 180

Abstract

Abstract

If one wants to understand spatial planning, then one needs to know about the self-conceptions and professional identities of the key actors. So far, this has hardly been the object of scientific inquiries in Germany. This paper relies on a research design that analyses professional identities as resulting from the interplay of external discursive interpellations and own practices of identity work. It examines the roles, which are assigned to spatial planners at regional level in Germany, and how planners themselves perceive and shape their professional identities. The empirical part uses textual analyses and autobiographic narrative interviews to elucidate subject positions in published documents. It furthermore shows, which discursive interpellations spatial planners see themselves exposed to, which standards and norms they define for their professional work, which techniques of the self they employ und which tensions they perceive in this regard. The results tie in with international research on planners' roles and identities. The findings call on planning practitioners to reflect upon individual practices and existing opportunities of identity work.

Keywords

  • Spatial planners
  • Wind energy
  • Subjectivation
  • Subject positions
  • Subjectification
  • Techniques of the self
Open Access

Die subjektive Destitution des Planers: zu einer hysterisch-analytischen Triade von Planungstheorie, Forschung und Praxis

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 181 - 198

Abstract

Abstract

In this article, I set out different relationships between planning theory, research and practice, drawing on Lacan's "production of four discourses". I argue that each element of the planning theory-research-practice 'triad' acts as the discursive 'agent' and gives rise to particular kinds of 'subject-planner' (the 'master', the 'expert', the 'idealistic' and the 'pragmatic') with specific ideological upshots ('hidden' big other, 'feigned' big other, hysteria and subjective destitution). Primarily a theoretical discussion, the article is also partially underpinned by my own practical experience in planning. While Lacanian psychoanalytical theory has already entered the planning field, its deployment has been mostly centred on deconstructing both planning decision-making processes and the mediation of planners in creating and implementing plans. Hence, the attempt here is to look in more depth at the 'ambivalent' role of the planner as well as to bring in 'planning research', as a key, somewhat occluded, element within the discussion on bridging planning theory and practice. Further, in the literature there seems to be a sort of omnipresent assumption that 'valid' reflection on planning can only come from the 'outside', which in turn perpetuates the role of the academic researcher simply trying to decode and analyse what the practitioner does (or tries to do). Critical impressions from those 'out there', 'on the job', are still missing. They, far from mere anecdotic accounts, ought to comprise self-inflicted criticism triggered by a sense of discomfort with what's being done – by the hysterical question of "why am I a planner?" and "why I am doing this or that?"

Keywords

  • Planning theory
  • psychoanalytical theory
  • Lacan
  • discourse
  • uncertainty
Open Access

Planning in uncharted waters: spatial transformations, planning transitions and role-reflexive planning

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 199 - 211

Abstract

Abstract

For planners, processes of complex spatial transformations today are comparable to uncharted land and an uncertain voyage. Many possible role images overlap and contrast to traditional and established ways of thinking and acting. The focus here is on navigating instead of controlling, about supporting instead of enforcing. Planning lacks tools to think and act when facing uncertainty. This paper proposes role-reflexive planning as an educational and experimental approach to thinking through different potentialities. It offers groundwork from the boundary between planning and transition studies, using role-based ideas as a bridge. It offers an overview about different roles that are relevant to working towards transformations as spatial planners. It develops an account of role-reflexive planning that connects between contexts, actions and back to individual modes of behaviour in planning processes. As a basis, this paper condenses experiences of a role-playing pilot workshop and discussions about potential elements of a transition towards 'post-growth planning'. It outlines how role-playing challenges the individual roles of actors beyond the game situations themselves. Conceptual ideas foster a renewed role-based debate on thinking and acting in the face of uncertainty and ways to navigate through the stormy waters of transformation.

Keywords

  • Role of planners
  • role reflection
  • role-based approach

Rezension / Book review

Open Access

Grenzen. Theoretische, konzeptionelle und praxisbezogene Fragestellungen zu Grenzen und deren Überschreitungen

Published Online: 16 Mar 2019
Page range: 213 - 214

Abstract

Open Access

Gerber, Jean-David; Hartmann, Thomas; Hengstermann, Andreas (Hrsg.) (2018)

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 215 - 218

Abstract

Open Access

Zur Steuerungskraft der Raumordnungsplanung. Am Beispiel akzeptanzrelevanter Konflikte der Windenergieplanung

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 219 - 220

Abstract

Open Access

Umweltbezogene Gerechtigkeit. Anforderungen an eine zukunftsweisende Stadtplanung

Published Online: 01 Apr 2019
Page range: 221 - 223

Abstract

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