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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

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Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

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Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

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Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Conceptualising Quality in Spatial Planning

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

Quality discourses help to legitimate professions. This article therefore addresses the crucial question of how quality can be framed in spatial planning. Based on the context of spatial planning in Austria, this article introduces a normative framework for quality in spatial planning that considers the four dimensions of content, planning methodology, planning process and legal compliance, and shows howthese four dimensions are interlinked. Furthermore, it discusses how quality can be enhanced by concerted governmental action and further education for planners. It is argued that planners might need to adopt a new role as 'teachers' in planning processes to facilitate societal learning processes in order to raise the quality of planning. Finally, it is concluded that the quality debate in spatial planning can be useful to calibrate expectations of planners and society to directly influence sustainable spatial development through spatial planning, to communicate achievements in planning, to raise awareness for sustainable spatial development, and to improve legal frameworks, planning methodology, and planners' training and further education.

Keywords

  • Planning quality
  • planning content
  • planning methodology
  • planning process
  • legal compliance
  • spatial planning
  • role of planners

Schlagworte

  • Planungsqualität
  • Planungsinhalt
  • Planungsmethodik
  • Planungsprozess
  • Rechtssicherheit
  • Raumplanung
  • Rolle von Planerinnen und Planern
access type Open Access

Multioptionality: A new ("old") term in everyday mobility of the modern society?

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 17 - 34

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, the sociological term multioptionality is translated into the field of transport and mobility research. The aim is to stimulate a change of perspective from actual to potential mode choice by conceptualising multioptionality as a precondition for multimodal behaviours. The intention is to criticise the largely positive debate concerning transition from the automobile to the multimodal society. Multimodality discourse assumes a shift from the largely exclusive use of private cars to the flexible use of several transport modes. In this respect, the paper discusses the critical role of the concept of multioptionality in the transitional debate in three steps. i) The paper argues that structural developments such as interconnected mobility services legitimise the assumption of potentially "more" options, which increases opportunities for realising multimodal behaviours in everyday mobility, ii) Regressive tendencies in modern society lead to the assumption that mode options are, however, increasingly unequally distributed. In this sense, the emergence of multioptionality can be classified as a socially selective trend. iii) A concept proposal is put forward according to which the term multioptionality can be incorporated into empirical studies on multimodality in order to take a critical view of the uneven preconditions of options for the realisation of multimodal behaviours.

Keywords

  • Multioptionality
  • Multimodality
  • Mobility as a service
  • Reflexivity
  • Regression
access type Open Access

Vom Siedlungsbrei zum Städtischen? Eine mehrdimensionale Bestandsaufnahme der Suburbanisierung

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 35 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

In view of a phase of reurbanisation of German large cities, in this paper the question is raised, whether, where, with which intensity and tendency suburbanisation still can be found. Answers will be delivered by a multidimensional quantitative model. In addition to the population development, which often indicates a reurbanisation or suburbanisation trend, it includes the labour market and land consumption. Going beyond city-hinterland relations, it is investigated whether the surrounding areas of large cities show a development according to the ideal of decentralised concentration – in particular a concentration on medium-sized cities – or whether the development is more dispersely spread over smaller towns and municipalities. The calculations lead to a suburbanisation index, which can be periodically produced every few years (monitoring). Beyond a perspective mainly orientated towards the population development, the suburbanisation idea is improved and completed. Comparing the various dimensions (population, labour market, land consumption) generates partly controversial results.

Keywords

  • Suburbanisation
  • Reurbanisation
  • Index
  • Population development
  • Labour markets
  • Land consumption
access type Open Access

The portfolio of German biosphere reserves in the light of the Sustainable Development Goals

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 57 - 79

Abstract

Abstract

This paper discusses the representativeness of the German Biosphere Reserves. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals will serve as the theoretical framework of this analysis. Germany currently accounts a share of 16 % of the terrestrial land area under strict nature protection. This means that there is no quantity problem. Rather, the question arises about the number, geographical distribution and quality of protected areas – in this example Biosphere Reserves. So far, scientific papers only focus on the natural landscape representativeness of Biosphere Reserves in Germany. This is not enough for this category of protected areas as it rests on the paradigm of sustainable development. This is why this paper is focusing on possible structural and socioeconomic shortcomings in the network of German Biosphere Reserves. Therefore, precise indicators will be analysed in form of thematical maps to address selected Sustainable Development Goals. Furthermore, the existing Biosphere Reserves will be analysed if and to what extent they are able to reach their intended exemplary function towards "the rest of the world" as models for sustainable development.

Keywords

  • Biosphere reserves
  • Sustainable development
  • UN Sustainable Development Goals
  • Germany

Bericht aus der Praxis / Practice Report

access type Open Access

Protected Areas in Europe – Challenges for Scientific Collaboration. Experiences of the Research Group NeReGro

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 81 - 93

Abstract

Abstract

This paper addresses development and experiences of an international group of researchers with a focus on area protection in Europe. Under the acronym "NeReGro" (for "New regional development and large protected areas") four university research groups in geography from Switzerland, Austria and Germany practice successfully a rather lose, informal way of collaboration for almost20 years. Core subject of their joint activities is the considerable change experienced in area protection in Europe for quite some time. This is especially mirrored by large protected areas, many of which carry out a multitude of functions beyond the classical tasks of nature conservation. A considerable part of this research appears relatively isolated though, relatively disconnected and with limited mutual recognition. The development of NeReGro well illustrates the benefits that can be generated instead from ways of systematic collaboration for research on protected areas at large. These regard the development of a comparative international research agenda, the recognition of the societal implications of area protection, and the enhancement of the local-regional research perspective by a global view. Besides the added value of collaboration visibale through the work of NeReGro, the case of the research group equally illustrates limits of collabation similarly characteristic for protected areas research in Europe at large. Against this background, the consistent development of appropriate forms of research collaboration at European scale are demanded in order to meet future challenges caused by planning and management of protected areas.

Rezension / Book review

access type Open Access

Geschichte und Perspektiven der schweizerischen Raumplanung

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 95 - 97

Abstract

access type Open Access

Verlöschendes Industriezeitalter. Suche nach Aufbruch an Rhein, Ruhr und Emscher

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 99 - 100

Abstract

access type Open Access

Aneignung urbaner Freiräume – Ein Diskurs über städtischen Raum

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 101 - 103

Abstract

access type Open Access

Übermorgenstadt: Transformationspotenziale von Kommunen

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 105 - 106

Abstract

9 Articles

Beitrag / Article

access type Open Access

Conceptualising Quality in Spatial Planning

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 1 - 15

Abstract

Abstract

Quality discourses help to legitimate professions. This article therefore addresses the crucial question of how quality can be framed in spatial planning. Based on the context of spatial planning in Austria, this article introduces a normative framework for quality in spatial planning that considers the four dimensions of content, planning methodology, planning process and legal compliance, and shows howthese four dimensions are interlinked. Furthermore, it discusses how quality can be enhanced by concerted governmental action and further education for planners. It is argued that planners might need to adopt a new role as 'teachers' in planning processes to facilitate societal learning processes in order to raise the quality of planning. Finally, it is concluded that the quality debate in spatial planning can be useful to calibrate expectations of planners and society to directly influence sustainable spatial development through spatial planning, to communicate achievements in planning, to raise awareness for sustainable spatial development, and to improve legal frameworks, planning methodology, and planners' training and further education.

Keywords

  • Planning quality
  • planning content
  • planning methodology
  • planning process
  • legal compliance
  • spatial planning
  • role of planners

Schlagworte

  • Planungsqualität
  • Planungsinhalt
  • Planungsmethodik
  • Planungsprozess
  • Rechtssicherheit
  • Raumplanung
  • Rolle von Planerinnen und Planern
access type Open Access

Multioptionality: A new ("old") term in everyday mobility of the modern society?

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 17 - 34

Abstract

Abstract

In this paper, the sociological term multioptionality is translated into the field of transport and mobility research. The aim is to stimulate a change of perspective from actual to potential mode choice by conceptualising multioptionality as a precondition for multimodal behaviours. The intention is to criticise the largely positive debate concerning transition from the automobile to the multimodal society. Multimodality discourse assumes a shift from the largely exclusive use of private cars to the flexible use of several transport modes. In this respect, the paper discusses the critical role of the concept of multioptionality in the transitional debate in three steps. i) The paper argues that structural developments such as interconnected mobility services legitimise the assumption of potentially "more" options, which increases opportunities for realising multimodal behaviours in everyday mobility, ii) Regressive tendencies in modern society lead to the assumption that mode options are, however, increasingly unequally distributed. In this sense, the emergence of multioptionality can be classified as a socially selective trend. iii) A concept proposal is put forward according to which the term multioptionality can be incorporated into empirical studies on multimodality in order to take a critical view of the uneven preconditions of options for the realisation of multimodal behaviours.

Keywords

  • Multioptionality
  • Multimodality
  • Mobility as a service
  • Reflexivity
  • Regression
access type Open Access

Vom Siedlungsbrei zum Städtischen? Eine mehrdimensionale Bestandsaufnahme der Suburbanisierung

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 35 - 55

Abstract

Abstract

In view of a phase of reurbanisation of German large cities, in this paper the question is raised, whether, where, with which intensity and tendency suburbanisation still can be found. Answers will be delivered by a multidimensional quantitative model. In addition to the population development, which often indicates a reurbanisation or suburbanisation trend, it includes the labour market and land consumption. Going beyond city-hinterland relations, it is investigated whether the surrounding areas of large cities show a development according to the ideal of decentralised concentration – in particular a concentration on medium-sized cities – or whether the development is more dispersely spread over smaller towns and municipalities. The calculations lead to a suburbanisation index, which can be periodically produced every few years (monitoring). Beyond a perspective mainly orientated towards the population development, the suburbanisation idea is improved and completed. Comparing the various dimensions (population, labour market, land consumption) generates partly controversial results.

Keywords

  • Suburbanisation
  • Reurbanisation
  • Index
  • Population development
  • Labour markets
  • Land consumption
access type Open Access

The portfolio of German biosphere reserves in the light of the Sustainable Development Goals

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 57 - 79

Abstract

Abstract

This paper discusses the representativeness of the German Biosphere Reserves. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals will serve as the theoretical framework of this analysis. Germany currently accounts a share of 16 % of the terrestrial land area under strict nature protection. This means that there is no quantity problem. Rather, the question arises about the number, geographical distribution and quality of protected areas – in this example Biosphere Reserves. So far, scientific papers only focus on the natural landscape representativeness of Biosphere Reserves in Germany. This is not enough for this category of protected areas as it rests on the paradigm of sustainable development. This is why this paper is focusing on possible structural and socioeconomic shortcomings in the network of German Biosphere Reserves. Therefore, precise indicators will be analysed in form of thematical maps to address selected Sustainable Development Goals. Furthermore, the existing Biosphere Reserves will be analysed if and to what extent they are able to reach their intended exemplary function towards "the rest of the world" as models for sustainable development.

Keywords

  • Biosphere reserves
  • Sustainable development
  • UN Sustainable Development Goals
  • Germany

Bericht aus der Praxis / Practice Report

access type Open Access

Protected Areas in Europe – Challenges for Scientific Collaboration. Experiences of the Research Group NeReGro

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 81 - 93

Abstract

Abstract

This paper addresses development and experiences of an international group of researchers with a focus on area protection in Europe. Under the acronym "NeReGro" (for "New regional development and large protected areas") four university research groups in geography from Switzerland, Austria and Germany practice successfully a rather lose, informal way of collaboration for almost20 years. Core subject of their joint activities is the considerable change experienced in area protection in Europe for quite some time. This is especially mirrored by large protected areas, many of which carry out a multitude of functions beyond the classical tasks of nature conservation. A considerable part of this research appears relatively isolated though, relatively disconnected and with limited mutual recognition. The development of NeReGro well illustrates the benefits that can be generated instead from ways of systematic collaboration for research on protected areas at large. These regard the development of a comparative international research agenda, the recognition of the societal implications of area protection, and the enhancement of the local-regional research perspective by a global view. Besides the added value of collaboration visibale through the work of NeReGro, the case of the research group equally illustrates limits of collabation similarly characteristic for protected areas research in Europe at large. Against this background, the consistent development of appropriate forms of research collaboration at European scale are demanded in order to meet future challenges caused by planning and management of protected areas.

Rezension / Book review

access type Open Access

Geschichte und Perspektiven der schweizerischen Raumplanung

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 95 - 97

Abstract

access type Open Access

Verlöschendes Industriezeitalter. Suche nach Aufbruch an Rhein, Ruhr und Emscher

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 99 - 100

Abstract

access type Open Access

Aneignung urbaner Freiräume – Ein Diskurs über städtischen Raum

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 101 - 103

Abstract

access type Open Access

Übermorgenstadt: Transformationspotenziale von Kommunen

Published Online: 28 Feb 2019
Page range: 105 - 106

Abstract

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