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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

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Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

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Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Über soziale Verwundbarkeit, Planungsmethoden und Arbeitskräftemobilität

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 483 - 484

Abstract

Beitrag/Article

access type Open Access

Risk Management without Risk Reduction? The Role of Social Vulnerability in Post-Disaster Recovery after Floods in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 485 - 496

Abstract

Abstract

Environmental and climate hazards, such as floods, increasingly cause damages in cities and urbanised areas in Germany. The capacity of the impacted populations to cope with the outcome of related disasters is, amongst others, influenced by their vulnerability. Vulnerability reduction is thus key for creating social or structural resilience. This is particularly the case during post-disaster recovery and reconstruction. Recovery planning is, per definition, supposed to enable improvement, rather than a reconstruction of the status quo. However, which role does vulnerability play in recovery projects, and what kind of a recovery can improved planning lead to as a result? Based on a case study of the flood disaster of the river Danube in 2013, and particularly the Bavarian city of Deggendorf, we investigate these questions. From 2013 to 2018, data was collected by means of a survey, a spatial analysis and qualitative interviews. The results show how particular social vulnerabilities strongly influence the individual access to resources required during recovery and reconstruction as well as the capacity to deal with long-term disaster impacts. We conclude that recovery and development planning needs to acknowledge such vulnerabilities to a higher degree. The article contributes to discussions on the societal and governance causes for social vulnerability and is oriented towards actors responsible for planning and disaster management as well as the increasingly impacted public.

Keywords

  • Environmental disaster
  • Flood
  • Vulnerability
  • Recovery
  • Building back better
  • Risk management
  • Urban planning
  • Resilience
access type Open Access

Regional Mobility and Spatial Inequality: Determinants of Spatial Labor Market Behavior Considering Firm- and Region-Specific Factors

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 497 - 514

Abstract

Abstract

Regional disparities exist between states as well as within countries. In the Federal Republic of Germany, as a result of reunification, there are still considerable regional differences in terms of economic conditions. Local economic and structural circumstances affect individual employment opportunities and can be a motive for migration. Based on rational-economic approaches, the article examines the spatial labor market behavior of full-time employees subject to social security contributions, taking into account individual, firm-specific and regional characteristics. Workplace mobility is analyzed as a job move between the macro regions of North, South and East Germany. For this purpose, a linked employer-employee dataset (LIAB) from the “Institute for Employment Research” is used, supplemented by regional structural indicators (INKAR) at the level of the spatial planning regions. The analyses using binary logistic regression models show that transregional mobility especially depends on individual characteristics such as age and qualifications. Regarding regional features, it can be seen that the emigration tendency of younger employees increases with the local level of unemployment. Overall, the results do not indicate that there is a single-track brain drain from structurally weak regions. Nevertheless, these regions face a problem in age-specific migration patterns. The outflow of young workers weakens structurally poor areas directly and permanently.

Keywords

  • Regional mobility
  • Spatial inequality
  • Labor market
  • Regional structural indicators
access type Open Access

Rational vs. (?) communicative planning methods: Theoretical starting points, empirical findings from experiments and considerations for development of methods on the example of the utility-analysis

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 515 - 529

Abstract

Abstract

The aim of the article is, based on focused theoretical considerations, to find empirical results concerning the character of several planning methods to find conclusions for their further development. Examined is the question if several understandings of planning rationality are expressed in several planning methods. Firstly, the debate on the term of rationality in planning is reflected, which can be pointed to the dichotomy between means-and-ends-rationality on one hand and communicative rationality on the other. Based on this, empirical findings of a research project are presented, where several planning methods were valued on three main dimensions: “rational”, “communicative” and “creative”. Connected to this, on the example of the useful value analysis is examined if rational planning methods were developed towards the “communicative turn” in planning. In the conclusion a more systematic communicative design of proven rational planning methods is seen as an important and practical relevant field of planning research.

Keywords

  • Rationality
  • Communication
  • Planning methods
  • Experiments
  • Useful value analysis

Bericht Aus Der Praxis/Practice Report

access type Open Access

What do we need in Rural Areas? How to use Accessibility Modelling as a Strategy in Transport Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 531 - 550

Abstract

Abstract

Ensuring accessibility to public services and facilities is one of the biggest challenges for rural communities. Thus, planners need to locate spaces with problems in accessibility. It is necessary to estimate the impact of shifts in supply of social infrastructure or public transport. In this particular case, instruments are missing to visualize those shifts. Consequently, such an instrument was developed on behalf of the Ministry of Rural Affairs and Consumer Protection of the federal state of Baden-Württemberg (Germany) in the rural district of Calw. Along with using tools to operationalize a regional analysis of accessibility, an indexing model was developed, which combines in one indicator the accessibilities of public services and facilities providing everyday commodities. Furthermore, the instrument allows removing or adding facilities. It is thus possible to calculate operating figures, which can be used for objective decisions. Valuable for planners developing strategies for organizing services of public interest, the indexing model as part of the developed instrument describes a new method in spatial planning.

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Rural space
  • Public services
  • Transport modeling

Rezension/Book Review

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Über soziale Verwundbarkeit, Planungsmethoden und Arbeitskräftemobilität

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 483 - 484

Abstract

Beitrag/Article

access type Open Access

Risk Management without Risk Reduction? The Role of Social Vulnerability in Post-Disaster Recovery after Floods in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 485 - 496

Abstract

Abstract

Environmental and climate hazards, such as floods, increasingly cause damages in cities and urbanised areas in Germany. The capacity of the impacted populations to cope with the outcome of related disasters is, amongst others, influenced by their vulnerability. Vulnerability reduction is thus key for creating social or structural resilience. This is particularly the case during post-disaster recovery and reconstruction. Recovery planning is, per definition, supposed to enable improvement, rather than a reconstruction of the status quo. However, which role does vulnerability play in recovery projects, and what kind of a recovery can improved planning lead to as a result? Based on a case study of the flood disaster of the river Danube in 2013, and particularly the Bavarian city of Deggendorf, we investigate these questions. From 2013 to 2018, data was collected by means of a survey, a spatial analysis and qualitative interviews. The results show how particular social vulnerabilities strongly influence the individual access to resources required during recovery and reconstruction as well as the capacity to deal with long-term disaster impacts. We conclude that recovery and development planning needs to acknowledge such vulnerabilities to a higher degree. The article contributes to discussions on the societal and governance causes for social vulnerability and is oriented towards actors responsible for planning and disaster management as well as the increasingly impacted public.

Keywords

  • Environmental disaster
  • Flood
  • Vulnerability
  • Recovery
  • Building back better
  • Risk management
  • Urban planning
  • Resilience
access type Open Access

Regional Mobility and Spatial Inequality: Determinants of Spatial Labor Market Behavior Considering Firm- and Region-Specific Factors

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 497 - 514

Abstract

Abstract

Regional disparities exist between states as well as within countries. In the Federal Republic of Germany, as a result of reunification, there are still considerable regional differences in terms of economic conditions. Local economic and structural circumstances affect individual employment opportunities and can be a motive for migration. Based on rational-economic approaches, the article examines the spatial labor market behavior of full-time employees subject to social security contributions, taking into account individual, firm-specific and regional characteristics. Workplace mobility is analyzed as a job move between the macro regions of North, South and East Germany. For this purpose, a linked employer-employee dataset (LIAB) from the “Institute for Employment Research” is used, supplemented by regional structural indicators (INKAR) at the level of the spatial planning regions. The analyses using binary logistic regression models show that transregional mobility especially depends on individual characteristics such as age and qualifications. Regarding regional features, it can be seen that the emigration tendency of younger employees increases with the local level of unemployment. Overall, the results do not indicate that there is a single-track brain drain from structurally weak regions. Nevertheless, these regions face a problem in age-specific migration patterns. The outflow of young workers weakens structurally poor areas directly and permanently.

Keywords

  • Regional mobility
  • Spatial inequality
  • Labor market
  • Regional structural indicators
access type Open Access

Rational vs. (?) communicative planning methods: Theoretical starting points, empirical findings from experiments and considerations for development of methods on the example of the utility-analysis

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 515 - 529

Abstract

Abstract

The aim of the article is, based on focused theoretical considerations, to find empirical results concerning the character of several planning methods to find conclusions for their further development. Examined is the question if several understandings of planning rationality are expressed in several planning methods. Firstly, the debate on the term of rationality in planning is reflected, which can be pointed to the dichotomy between means-and-ends-rationality on one hand and communicative rationality on the other. Based on this, empirical findings of a research project are presented, where several planning methods were valued on three main dimensions: “rational”, “communicative” and “creative”. Connected to this, on the example of the useful value analysis is examined if rational planning methods were developed towards the “communicative turn” in planning. In the conclusion a more systematic communicative design of proven rational planning methods is seen as an important and practical relevant field of planning research.

Keywords

  • Rationality
  • Communication
  • Planning methods
  • Experiments
  • Useful value analysis

Bericht Aus Der Praxis/Practice Report

access type Open Access

What do we need in Rural Areas? How to use Accessibility Modelling as a Strategy in Transport Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2018
Page range: 531 - 550

Abstract

Abstract

Ensuring accessibility to public services and facilities is one of the biggest challenges for rural communities. Thus, planners need to locate spaces with problems in accessibility. It is necessary to estimate the impact of shifts in supply of social infrastructure or public transport. In this particular case, instruments are missing to visualize those shifts. Consequently, such an instrument was developed on behalf of the Ministry of Rural Affairs and Consumer Protection of the federal state of Baden-Württemberg (Germany) in the rural district of Calw. Along with using tools to operationalize a regional analysis of accessibility, an indexing model was developed, which combines in one indicator the accessibilities of public services and facilities providing everyday commodities. Furthermore, the instrument allows removing or adding facilities. It is thus possible to calculate operating figures, which can be used for objective decisions. Valuable for planners developing strategies for organizing services of public interest, the indexing model as part of the developed instrument describes a new method in spatial planning.

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Rural space
  • Public services
  • Transport modeling

Rezension/Book Review

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