Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Facetten urbaner Strukturen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 411 - 412

Abstract

Beitrag/Article

access type Open Access

Empirical foundation of central-place-concepts – Recommendations for an ideal type approach

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 471 - 485

Abstract

Abstract

The topic of “central places” (again) steadily gains relevance in spatial science as well as in regional planning. Emphasising the requirement to verify central-place concepts empirically, corresponding aims of comprehensive regional planning can be justified in a reasonable way. It has so far remained open which methodological demands have to relate to this validation and how in particular these specifications should be fulfilled. These questions form the background for this article. It introduces four optional approaches towards the empirical foundation of central-place concepts as an indispensable prerequisite for legal certainty and proposes in the end an iterative approach as ideal type.

Keywords

  • Central-place concept
  • Goals of spatial planning
  • Legal requirements in spatial planning
  • Operationalisation
  • Validation
access type Open Access

Weekend Commuting of Employees in Germany: Analysis of the Mircocensus 1991 to 2012

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 413 - 427

Abstract

Abstract

Many employees must cope with long distances between their workplaces and residences. While some employees manage these distances via daily commuting, if distances are very large, employees may be required to relocate permanently (sometimes with their families) or to establish second homes closer to their workplaces. A typical form of the latter multi-local living arrangements is for the employee to live in their second home during the week and return to their primary (family) home for the weekend (weekend commute). Using data from the German Microcensus 1991-2012, this paper first examines changes over time in rates of weekend commuting among employees in Germany. Second, it explores socio-demographic characteristics related to weekend commuting and whether gender differences exist. Results show continuously increasing rates of weekend commuting, rising from 0.34% in 1991 to 1.02% in 2008. Weekend commuting has thus approximately tripled, with a total of 339,000 weekend commuters in 2008. The number of impacted individuals doubles if weekend commuters’ partners and children are also considered. In contrast to the long-term trend, in 2012, reported rates of weekend commuting declined. We discuss how this drop may reflect a methodological bias rather than true decreases in weekend commuting. We observed gender differences in the factors contributing to weekend commuting, most notably the impacts of family living arrangements and occupational status. Compared to previous investigations of weekend commuting, the large sample size of the current analyses permitted identification of more nuanced relations among gender, age, geographic region, and other factors influencing weekend commuting choices.

Keywords

  • Weekend commuting/commute
  • Weekly commuting/commute
  • Work-related residential multi-locality
  • Socio-demographics
  • Germany
access type Open Access

The impact of urban green space on real estate prices: A hedonic analysis for the city of Berlin

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 429 - 438

Abstract

Abstract

Urban green space represents a key aspect for the sustainable development of urban areas. The benefit of urban green space can also be reflected in higher property and land prices. Although a high number of international studies prove the impact of urban green on real estate prices, the empirical basis in Germany is still very limited. The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of urban green space on real estate prices in Germany. The data set contains transaction data for single family homes (1996-2012) provided by the Committee of Valuation Experts (GAA, Gutachterausschuss für Grundstückswerte) for the city of Berlin and cross section geo-coded data for urban green drawn from the European Urban Atlas (EUA) of the European Environment Agency. In order to control for additional open space categories we further incorporated geo-coded data on water bodies, forest, farmland and fallow land. The analysis shows a positive impact of urban green on real estate prices. The results provide helpful information on the capitalization of urban green space in real estate prices.

Keywords

  • Urban green space
  • Hedonic pricing
  • GIS-Analysis
  • Urban development
  • Ecosystem services

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Dortmund, Duisburg and the 2008/2009 Recession – Why two Cities of one Region show Different Patterns of Economic Resilience

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 439 - 453

Abstract

Abstract

Structural transformation still constitutes one of the major challenges of cities in the Ruhr area. Against this background it is worth asking the question how the Ruhr cities absorbed the recent economic crisis. In this article, we compare the economic resilience of the two cities of Dortmund und Duisburg (Germany). Resilience theory is a promising perspective with regard to the transformation of post-industrial regions. However, measuring resilience is, in terms of methods and indicators, still an evolving task. We use qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to measure the resilience of the two cities. Our study shows that the two cities differ remarkably in the way they coped with the recent crisis. According to our empirical analysis this can be explained by different capacities of resilience that have been built up in the decades before.

Keywords

  • Economic resilience
  • Ruhr area
  • Structural change
  • Regional economy
  • Duisburg
  • Dortmund
access type Open Access

Network Structures of Creative-urban Milieus in Medium-sized Cities

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 455 - 469

Abstract

Abstract

Cities are increasingly reliant on innovative ideas to better survive in global competition. These ideas are based on creative potential which can only be revealed by the creative inhabitants of the cities. However, the creativity of single geniuses is less relevant than the collective creativity of the whole milieu. To utilize the resources of these creative-urban milieus further information about their networks is necessary. Creativity is regarded as a form of implicit knowledge which arises and is passed through interaction within the framework of spatially-related network relationships. The article explores to what extend creativity is a resource of cities, which role the collective network-resource has for urban development and how actors can be identified which allows an integration of creative potential in urban development and urban planning. Features and structures of a creative-urban milieu in the city of Braunschweig (Germany) are analysed by ego-centered network-relationships of several actors. Information about different roles, functions and meanings of single actors or groups in the milieu, about different network-layers, about density and centrality are given in order to get a better understanding of the development of creative-urban milieus in medium-sized cities.

Keywords

  • Creativity
  • Creative-urban milieu
  • Network analysis
  • Urban development
  • Knowledge
  • Braunschweig

Rezension/Book Review

access type Open Access

Analyse, Bewertung und Sicherung alpiner Freiräume durch Raumordnung und räumliche Planung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 487 - 489

Abstract

access type Open Access

Das Unbehagen in der Planung. Hochwassergefahren, Regionalplanung und ihre Wirkungen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 491 - 492

Abstract

access type Open Access

Landschaftsplanung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 493 - 494

Abstract

access type Open Access

Regionalentwicklung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 495 - 496

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Facetten urbaner Strukturen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 411 - 412

Abstract

Beitrag/Article

access type Open Access

Empirical foundation of central-place-concepts – Recommendations for an ideal type approach

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 471 - 485

Abstract

Abstract

The topic of “central places” (again) steadily gains relevance in spatial science as well as in regional planning. Emphasising the requirement to verify central-place concepts empirically, corresponding aims of comprehensive regional planning can be justified in a reasonable way. It has so far remained open which methodological demands have to relate to this validation and how in particular these specifications should be fulfilled. These questions form the background for this article. It introduces four optional approaches towards the empirical foundation of central-place concepts as an indispensable prerequisite for legal certainty and proposes in the end an iterative approach as ideal type.

Keywords

  • Central-place concept
  • Goals of spatial planning
  • Legal requirements in spatial planning
  • Operationalisation
  • Validation
access type Open Access

Weekend Commuting of Employees in Germany: Analysis of the Mircocensus 1991 to 2012

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 413 - 427

Abstract

Abstract

Many employees must cope with long distances between their workplaces and residences. While some employees manage these distances via daily commuting, if distances are very large, employees may be required to relocate permanently (sometimes with their families) or to establish second homes closer to their workplaces. A typical form of the latter multi-local living arrangements is for the employee to live in their second home during the week and return to their primary (family) home for the weekend (weekend commute). Using data from the German Microcensus 1991-2012, this paper first examines changes over time in rates of weekend commuting among employees in Germany. Second, it explores socio-demographic characteristics related to weekend commuting and whether gender differences exist. Results show continuously increasing rates of weekend commuting, rising from 0.34% in 1991 to 1.02% in 2008. Weekend commuting has thus approximately tripled, with a total of 339,000 weekend commuters in 2008. The number of impacted individuals doubles if weekend commuters’ partners and children are also considered. In contrast to the long-term trend, in 2012, reported rates of weekend commuting declined. We discuss how this drop may reflect a methodological bias rather than true decreases in weekend commuting. We observed gender differences in the factors contributing to weekend commuting, most notably the impacts of family living arrangements and occupational status. Compared to previous investigations of weekend commuting, the large sample size of the current analyses permitted identification of more nuanced relations among gender, age, geographic region, and other factors influencing weekend commuting choices.

Keywords

  • Weekend commuting/commute
  • Weekly commuting/commute
  • Work-related residential multi-locality
  • Socio-demographics
  • Germany
access type Open Access

The impact of urban green space on real estate prices: A hedonic analysis for the city of Berlin

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 429 - 438

Abstract

Abstract

Urban green space represents a key aspect for the sustainable development of urban areas. The benefit of urban green space can also be reflected in higher property and land prices. Although a high number of international studies prove the impact of urban green on real estate prices, the empirical basis in Germany is still very limited. The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of urban green space on real estate prices in Germany. The data set contains transaction data for single family homes (1996-2012) provided by the Committee of Valuation Experts (GAA, Gutachterausschuss für Grundstückswerte) for the city of Berlin and cross section geo-coded data for urban green drawn from the European Urban Atlas (EUA) of the European Environment Agency. In order to control for additional open space categories we further incorporated geo-coded data on water bodies, forest, farmland and fallow land. The analysis shows a positive impact of urban green on real estate prices. The results provide helpful information on the capitalization of urban green space in real estate prices.

Keywords

  • Urban green space
  • Hedonic pricing
  • GIS-Analysis
  • Urban development
  • Ecosystem services

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Dortmund, Duisburg and the 2008/2009 Recession – Why two Cities of one Region show Different Patterns of Economic Resilience

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 439 - 453

Abstract

Abstract

Structural transformation still constitutes one of the major challenges of cities in the Ruhr area. Against this background it is worth asking the question how the Ruhr cities absorbed the recent economic crisis. In this article, we compare the economic resilience of the two cities of Dortmund und Duisburg (Germany). Resilience theory is a promising perspective with regard to the transformation of post-industrial regions. However, measuring resilience is, in terms of methods and indicators, still an evolving task. We use qualitative as well as quantitative approaches to measure the resilience of the two cities. Our study shows that the two cities differ remarkably in the way they coped with the recent crisis. According to our empirical analysis this can be explained by different capacities of resilience that have been built up in the decades before.

Keywords

  • Economic resilience
  • Ruhr area
  • Structural change
  • Regional economy
  • Duisburg
  • Dortmund
access type Open Access

Network Structures of Creative-urban Milieus in Medium-sized Cities

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 455 - 469

Abstract

Abstract

Cities are increasingly reliant on innovative ideas to better survive in global competition. These ideas are based on creative potential which can only be revealed by the creative inhabitants of the cities. However, the creativity of single geniuses is less relevant than the collective creativity of the whole milieu. To utilize the resources of these creative-urban milieus further information about their networks is necessary. Creativity is regarded as a form of implicit knowledge which arises and is passed through interaction within the framework of spatially-related network relationships. The article explores to what extend creativity is a resource of cities, which role the collective network-resource has for urban development and how actors can be identified which allows an integration of creative potential in urban development and urban planning. Features and structures of a creative-urban milieu in the city of Braunschweig (Germany) are analysed by ego-centered network-relationships of several actors. Information about different roles, functions and meanings of single actors or groups in the milieu, about different network-layers, about density and centrality are given in order to get a better understanding of the development of creative-urban milieus in medium-sized cities.

Keywords

  • Creativity
  • Creative-urban milieu
  • Network analysis
  • Urban development
  • Knowledge
  • Braunschweig

Rezension/Book Review

access type Open Access

Analyse, Bewertung und Sicherung alpiner Freiräume durch Raumordnung und räumliche Planung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 487 - 489

Abstract

access type Open Access

Das Unbehagen in der Planung. Hochwassergefahren, Regionalplanung und ihre Wirkungen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 491 - 492

Abstract

access type Open Access

Landschaftsplanung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 493 - 494

Abstract

access type Open Access

Regionalentwicklung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2017
Page range: 495 - 496

Abstract

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo