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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

11 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Von Diskursen und Diskussionen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 317 - 318

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

Open Access

Foucault instead of Fürst? Thoughts on an increasingly important paradigm

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 319 - 325

Abstract

Abstract

Especially drawing on the contributions of Zimmermann (2012) and Balke and Reimer (2016) published in the journal “Raumforschung und Raumordnung”, this article deals with research done under the keywords constructivism, discourse and governmentality. Taking the example of those two contributions the author presents his thoughts on the relationship between the emerging social constructivist paradigm on the one hand and the (previous) mainstream on the other hand. He argues for an open discussion in order to improve the understanding of commonalities and divergences between these approaches.

Keywords

  • Constructivism
  • Discourse
  • Governmentality
  • Landscape
  • Region

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

McKinseyization or governmental policy? Management consultancies in urban development strategies. The case “Metropolis Hamburg – Growing City”

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 327 - 338

Abstract

Abstract

At the beginning of the millennium, Hamburg’s urban strategy “Metropolis Hamburg – Growing City” was a sensation for urban studies and urban planning. On one hand, it was one of the first urban policy papers that explicitly focused on growth, on the other hand, entirely new actor constellations within urban development became apparent because external experts like management consultants were identified as key actor besides urban government and planning department. This was generalized as “McKinseyization“. Taking Hamburg as an example, this paper addresses the questions which role the consultancy McKinsey played for the Growing City Strategy and what McKinseyization of urban development means against this background. These questions are still highly relevant because management consultants are regularly involved in urban and regional development strategies ever since then. In order to bind these diverse topics together, I begin with introducing the interrelationships between strategic urban development and consulting. Then I will elaborate the concrete interrelationship between Hamburg’s strategy and McKinsey’s paper “Hamburg Vision 2020” from 2001. The analysis shows that the thesis of a McKinseyization needs to be re-evaluated: from a direct influence of McKinsey towards the production of a context which enables the establishment of new entrepreneurial urban policies. Finally I qualify the dimensions characterizing a McKinseyization. The paper thus contributes to a still pending processing of the Growing City strategy‘s roots and generally synthesizes the complex context of origin of strategic urban development under the influence of external advice.

Keywords

  • Urban development strategies
  • Expertise
  • McKinsey
  • Consulting
  • Urban policy
  • Hamburg
Open Access

Implications of E-Mobility from a User Behavior Perspective Regarding Traffic, Environment and Space

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 339 - 353

Abstract

Abstract

For the individual acceptance and social dissemination of technological innovations like e-Mobility in an appropriate manner the decision behaviour of potential users should be taken into account. In consideration of this the paper provides an overview of relevant determinants of individual willingness to substitute between conventional propulsion technologies and electrical drive engineering in the field of individual motor car traffic in terms of subjective opportunity costs and other important behaviouristic effects. Based on these insights some significant implications of e-Mobility regarding future trends in traffic, important environmental effects as well as the spread of e-Mobility in urban and rural areas will be derived.

Keywords

  • E-Mobility
  • User behaviour
  • Traffic
  • Environmental effects
  • Urban areas
  • Rural areas
Open Access

Intermodal, Urban, Mobile – Characterization of Intermodal Trips and Users Taking the Example of Berlin

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 355 - 369

Abstract

Abstract

Intermodal travel behaviour – the combination of different modes on a single trip – is increasingly taken into consideration in everyday mobility. In particular, urban areas face negative consequences from high car traffic and scarce parking space. Simultaneously, larger cities often have a well-developed public transport system and good accessibility by bike or on foot, which allows the use of other modes than the car. Intermodal travel behaviour enables an individual and flexible mobility. This means that persons rather use and combine different transport modes according to their specific travel needs than committing themselves to one single mode of transport. On the contrary, the use of more than one mode of transport also requires more extensive planning of the trips, the willingness to change, and specific mobility skills and information. Using the example of Berlin, this article discusses intermodal travel behaviour in the context of everyday mobility in European cities. Therefore, we analyse the amount and the specific characteristics of intermodal trips. Then, persons with intermodal travel behaviour are identified and examined in comparison to unimodal reference groups. The results show that only a small amount of trips is currently intermodal. These trips are on average longer than unimodal trips and are routine trips (e.g., trips to work) covered by two or more different modes of transport. Moreover, intermodal users differ from unimodal users: persons who combine two or more transport modes on work trips tend to be younger, female, and have a higher education level. They have diverse mobility resources available in their households, although they have to plan their usage with other household members. Furthermore, intermodal travel behaviour varies depending on the residential location within the city. The findings suggest that specific user groups and their demands must be addressed when expanding and optimizing intermodal mobility options.

Keywords

  • Intermodality
  • Travel behaviour
  • Trips to work
  • Travel survey (SrV)
  • Berlin
Open Access

The SARO-Report (1961): Evaluation of its Development, Contents and Effects

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 371 - 387

Abstract

Abstract

The paper provides a historical review and appraisal of the 1961 report by the Expert Committee Responsible for Spatial Planning (SARO), which is judged to have had great significance for the start-up phase of federal spatial planning in Germany. The focus of the analysis is on a detailed evaluation of the text according to five key questions concerning its suitability as a policy advice document. Looking back to the policy advice demands of the time, the extent to which the text fulfilled the task allocated to the committee is assessed. Looking forwards, the political resonance of the text is outlined using important spatial planning documents of the years up to 1975. It is concluded that the suitability of the text for providing policy advice is limited by a number of factors. Criticisms include the use of the carrying capacity concept as a benchmark and the insufficient elaboration of the strategy in both material and procedural terms. Nonetheless, the political resonance of the document was positive and the report represented an important step towards the Spatial Planning Act of 1965.

Keywords

  • SARO-report
  • Policy advice
  • Consulting demand
  • Resonance of advice
  • Guiding principle
  • Strategy

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

The Role of Regional Planning in Dealing with Wind Power Conflicts in Germany and Prospects for Spatial Research

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 389 - 398

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, regional planning plays a key role in the designation of sites for wind turbines. Relying on instruments such as “priority areas”, “suitable areas” and “exclusion areas”, regional planners have the legal authority to designate areas for wind energy schemes. Bearing in mind their leading role in the final decision regarding the siting of such plants, regional planners find themselves on the firing line between the supporters and opponents of wind power. The first group considers wind power as an efficient, clean and safe source of energy as well as an alternative to non-regenerative fuels. For the second group, wind farms present a risk to health and are drivers of an unwanted change of landscape. The aim of this paper is to examine the potentials and limitations of regional planning concerning these conflicts. Specifically, we investigate the ongoing regional plan for the Saxon planning region Oberes Elbtal/Osterzgebirge (Upper Elbe Valley/Eastern Ore Mountains). One interesting aspect of the planning process is a dedicated working group that aims to bring together supporters and opponents of wind energy. The results show that while regional planning can help to bring transparency to the planning process, it is unable to resolve the basic conflict between the two sides.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Regional planning
  • Wind turbines
  • Public participation
  • Policy making

Rezension

Open Access

Gentrification: neue Forschungsergebnisse aus Berlin und Köln

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 399 - 402

Abstract

Open Access

Peripherisierung und Stadt. Städtische Planungspolitiken gegen den Abstieg

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 403 - 404

Abstract

Open Access

Taubenböck, Hannes; Wurm, Michael; Esch, Thomas; Dech, Stefan (Hrsg.) (2015):Globale Urbanisierung. Perspektive aus dem All

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 405 - 406

Abstract

Open Access

Wohnstandortentscheidungen von Doppelverdienerhaushalten. Zum Zusammenwirken von Wohnen und Arbeiten in der polyzentrischen Stadtregion Köln/Bonn

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 407 - 409

Abstract

11 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Von Diskursen und Diskussionen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 317 - 318

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

Open Access

Foucault instead of Fürst? Thoughts on an increasingly important paradigm

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 319 - 325

Abstract

Abstract

Especially drawing on the contributions of Zimmermann (2012) and Balke and Reimer (2016) published in the journal “Raumforschung und Raumordnung”, this article deals with research done under the keywords constructivism, discourse and governmentality. Taking the example of those two contributions the author presents his thoughts on the relationship between the emerging social constructivist paradigm on the one hand and the (previous) mainstream on the other hand. He argues for an open discussion in order to improve the understanding of commonalities and divergences between these approaches.

Keywords

  • Constructivism
  • Discourse
  • Governmentality
  • Landscape
  • Region

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

McKinseyization or governmental policy? Management consultancies in urban development strategies. The case “Metropolis Hamburg – Growing City”

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 327 - 338

Abstract

Abstract

At the beginning of the millennium, Hamburg’s urban strategy “Metropolis Hamburg – Growing City” was a sensation for urban studies and urban planning. On one hand, it was one of the first urban policy papers that explicitly focused on growth, on the other hand, entirely new actor constellations within urban development became apparent because external experts like management consultants were identified as key actor besides urban government and planning department. This was generalized as “McKinseyization“. Taking Hamburg as an example, this paper addresses the questions which role the consultancy McKinsey played for the Growing City Strategy and what McKinseyization of urban development means against this background. These questions are still highly relevant because management consultants are regularly involved in urban and regional development strategies ever since then. In order to bind these diverse topics together, I begin with introducing the interrelationships between strategic urban development and consulting. Then I will elaborate the concrete interrelationship between Hamburg’s strategy and McKinsey’s paper “Hamburg Vision 2020” from 2001. The analysis shows that the thesis of a McKinseyization needs to be re-evaluated: from a direct influence of McKinsey towards the production of a context which enables the establishment of new entrepreneurial urban policies. Finally I qualify the dimensions characterizing a McKinseyization. The paper thus contributes to a still pending processing of the Growing City strategy‘s roots and generally synthesizes the complex context of origin of strategic urban development under the influence of external advice.

Keywords

  • Urban development strategies
  • Expertise
  • McKinsey
  • Consulting
  • Urban policy
  • Hamburg
Open Access

Implications of E-Mobility from a User Behavior Perspective Regarding Traffic, Environment and Space

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 339 - 353

Abstract

Abstract

For the individual acceptance and social dissemination of technological innovations like e-Mobility in an appropriate manner the decision behaviour of potential users should be taken into account. In consideration of this the paper provides an overview of relevant determinants of individual willingness to substitute between conventional propulsion technologies and electrical drive engineering in the field of individual motor car traffic in terms of subjective opportunity costs and other important behaviouristic effects. Based on these insights some significant implications of e-Mobility regarding future trends in traffic, important environmental effects as well as the spread of e-Mobility in urban and rural areas will be derived.

Keywords

  • E-Mobility
  • User behaviour
  • Traffic
  • Environmental effects
  • Urban areas
  • Rural areas
Open Access

Intermodal, Urban, Mobile – Characterization of Intermodal Trips and Users Taking the Example of Berlin

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 355 - 369

Abstract

Abstract

Intermodal travel behaviour – the combination of different modes on a single trip – is increasingly taken into consideration in everyday mobility. In particular, urban areas face negative consequences from high car traffic and scarce parking space. Simultaneously, larger cities often have a well-developed public transport system and good accessibility by bike or on foot, which allows the use of other modes than the car. Intermodal travel behaviour enables an individual and flexible mobility. This means that persons rather use and combine different transport modes according to their specific travel needs than committing themselves to one single mode of transport. On the contrary, the use of more than one mode of transport also requires more extensive planning of the trips, the willingness to change, and specific mobility skills and information. Using the example of Berlin, this article discusses intermodal travel behaviour in the context of everyday mobility in European cities. Therefore, we analyse the amount and the specific characteristics of intermodal trips. Then, persons with intermodal travel behaviour are identified and examined in comparison to unimodal reference groups. The results show that only a small amount of trips is currently intermodal. These trips are on average longer than unimodal trips and are routine trips (e.g., trips to work) covered by two or more different modes of transport. Moreover, intermodal users differ from unimodal users: persons who combine two or more transport modes on work trips tend to be younger, female, and have a higher education level. They have diverse mobility resources available in their households, although they have to plan their usage with other household members. Furthermore, intermodal travel behaviour varies depending on the residential location within the city. The findings suggest that specific user groups and their demands must be addressed when expanding and optimizing intermodal mobility options.

Keywords

  • Intermodality
  • Travel behaviour
  • Trips to work
  • Travel survey (SrV)
  • Berlin
Open Access

The SARO-Report (1961): Evaluation of its Development, Contents and Effects

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 371 - 387

Abstract

Abstract

The paper provides a historical review and appraisal of the 1961 report by the Expert Committee Responsible for Spatial Planning (SARO), which is judged to have had great significance for the start-up phase of federal spatial planning in Germany. The focus of the analysis is on a detailed evaluation of the text according to five key questions concerning its suitability as a policy advice document. Looking back to the policy advice demands of the time, the extent to which the text fulfilled the task allocated to the committee is assessed. Looking forwards, the political resonance of the text is outlined using important spatial planning documents of the years up to 1975. It is concluded that the suitability of the text for providing policy advice is limited by a number of factors. Criticisms include the use of the carrying capacity concept as a benchmark and the insufficient elaboration of the strategy in both material and procedural terms. Nonetheless, the political resonance of the document was positive and the report represented an important step towards the Spatial Planning Act of 1965.

Keywords

  • SARO-report
  • Policy advice
  • Consulting demand
  • Resonance of advice
  • Guiding principle
  • Strategy

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

The Role of Regional Planning in Dealing with Wind Power Conflicts in Germany and Prospects for Spatial Research

Published Online: 31 Aug 2017
Page range: 389 - 398

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, regional planning plays a key role in the designation of sites for wind turbines. Relying on instruments such as “priority areas”, “suitable areas” and “exclusion areas”, regional planners have the legal authority to designate areas for wind energy schemes. Bearing in mind their leading role in the final decision regarding the siting of such plants, regional planners find themselves on the firing line between the supporters and opponents of wind power. The first group considers wind power as an efficient, clean and safe source of energy as well as an alternative to non-regenerative fuels. For the second group, wind farms present a risk to health and are drivers of an unwanted change of landscape. The aim of this paper is to examine the potentials and limitations of regional planning concerning these conflicts. Specifically, we investigate the ongoing regional plan for the Saxon planning region Oberes Elbtal/Osterzgebirge (Upper Elbe Valley/Eastern Ore Mountains). One interesting aspect of the planning process is a dedicated working group that aims to bring together supporters and opponents of wind energy. The results show that while regional planning can help to bring transparency to the planning process, it is unable to resolve the basic conflict between the two sides.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Regional planning
  • Wind turbines
  • Public participation
  • Policy making

Rezension

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