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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

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Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

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Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 387 - 389

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Key players: Space as object of and resource in processes of change

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 391 - 403

Abstract

Abstract

With the notion of key players the authors tackle a major conceptual problem in recent debates on socio-spatial change. How can we conceptualize socio-scientifically what perceived wisdom among practitioners frequently maintains: the decisive role of single persons in complex processes of change? This paper seeks to identify socio-scientific concepts from several disciplinary strands, mainly from political sciences, organization and management studies and sociology that are helpful for defining key players and for understanding their contribution to processes of change. Furthermore, the authors elucidate heuristically in how far the influence of the types “leader”, “intermediary” and “governance pioneer” can also be explained in terms of how they act in space and how they mobilize spatially distributed resources. Space, it is argued, can be understood as an object of change and as a resource in processes of change.

Keywords

  • Key players
  • Leadership
  • Intermediaries
  • Governance
  • Spatial constructs
access type Open Access

Promotors in Regional Innovation Systems – Three Examples from Northwest Germany

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 405 - 419

Abstract

Abstract

The organization of regional innovation systems is mostly complex and results not only from specific conditions on-site, but also from networking activities of individual actors. In this respect, economic development agencies play a key role, particularly as their responsibilities normally include the initiation and support of innovation processes. In order to ensure this, economic development agencies in practice often enter into joint collaboration with special innovation consultants. These actors are strongly interlinked with potential innovation partners enabling them to support innovation processes, especially in small and medium-sized enterprises. Due to this network capability, economists have established the role model of the relationship promotor which is in the focus of this paper. Taking the example of three regions in Northwest Germany, we analyze the function of economic development agencies and innovation consultants as relationship promotors and their specific strategies affecting the configuration of different innovation systems. It will be shown that the three regions – district of Oldenburg, Oldenburger Münsterland, Elbe-Weser region – adopt different strategies varying in terms of territorial dimension, range of actors and degree of networking. Basically, the configuration of regional innovation systems to a large extent depends on various sources of power of the operating promotors. Apart from three typical sources of power which can be found in the literature – social competence, networking knowledge, relationship patterns – the empirical analysis also reveals the reputation of relationship promotors as additional factor of being able to exert influence.

Keywords

  • Innovation systems
  • Relationship promotors
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Economic development
  • Northwest Germany
access type Open Access

Cluster Organizations in Praxis

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 421 - 436

Abstract

Abstract

Cluster organizations implement cluster policies and affect the outcome of them to a high degree. Their work is influenced by interactions with the promoted firms, political and other actors. A sound consultancy of cluster promotion should know these influences and take them seriously, because they shape the strengths, weaknesses and potentials of cluster organizations. This article examines how cluster organizations in Bavaria translate cluster theory into practical activities and how other actors influence them in the process. The influences are subdivided into institutional and structural factors. Institutional factors refer to social institutions that other actors impose on the organizations. It will be shown that these factors shape the work of cluster organizations to a high degree, but only seldom restrain it. The organizations positions and tasks within the wider economic promotion system constitute the structural factors. They confine the organizations towards networking activities and force them to cooperate with other promotional actors, if they want to provide a comprehensive cluster promotion.

Keywords

  • Cluster policy
  • Cluster organizations
  • Regional economic development
  • Bavaria
access type Open Access

Method of GIS-based-modelling analyzing Accessibility for Stroke Units

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 437 - 450

Abstract

Abstract

The methodologically-oriented paper presents a method for modeling supply areas and accessibility of stroke units in Germany with the use of geographic information systems (GIS). Based on OpenStreetMap-data vector routing based catchment areas of stroke units are analysed and blended with vector-based demographic data at a spatially disaggregated level. A modeling of temporal accessibility with rescue vehicles resulted in isochrone-maps. The intersection of these maps with high-resolution demographic attributed data offers different analysis options. These are demonstrated in a case study from Lower Franconia, which is to outline the potential of the method for the spatial planning of stroke units. An application of the method to other medical institutions or the intersection with other thematic attribute data is possible.

Keywords

  • Accessibility analysis
  • GIS
  • Healthcare
  • Stroke units
access type Open Access

Space and Traffic – A Field of Complex Interrelations. Can Interventions in the Built Environment Really Reduce Transport-Related Climate Emissions?

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 451 - 465

Abstract

Abstract

The image of an integrated urban and transport planning is linked to the hope for a turnaround in the mutual interrelations between the built environment and transport that have actually induced more transport to date. Planning interventions in location structures and transport supply should therefore effectively contribute to reduce transport-related climate emissions. However, the targeted design of mixed land-use and compact location structures on the local and regional level is superimposed by societal and spatial trends that make large-scale mobility politically desirable or necessary. Against this background, the hopes mentioned before appear widely overstated. In this paper we put well-known empirical findings in new contexts of interpretation, and we point to other – from our perspective, more important – drivers of transport trends that are beyond the scope of integrated urban and transport planning. We conclude that integrated urban and transport planning should not be justified by avoiding carbon dioxide emissions, but remains reasonable for other reasons.

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • Traffic
  • Spatial development
  • Reurbanisation
  • Climate protection
  • Traffic planning

Rezension

access type Open Access

Ansichtssache Stadtnatur. Zwischennutzungen und Naturverständnisse

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 467 - 469

Abstract

access type Open Access

Mikrokosmos Stadtviertel. Lokale Partizipation und Raumpolitik

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 471 - 473

Abstract

access type Open Access

Theorien in der Raum- und Stadtforschung. Einführungen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 475 - 476

Abstract

access type Open Access

Deutsche Raumplanung. Das Modell der „Zentralen Orte“ zwischen NS-Staat und Bundesrepublik

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 477 - 478

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 387 - 389

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Key players: Space as object of and resource in processes of change

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 391 - 403

Abstract

Abstract

With the notion of key players the authors tackle a major conceptual problem in recent debates on socio-spatial change. How can we conceptualize socio-scientifically what perceived wisdom among practitioners frequently maintains: the decisive role of single persons in complex processes of change? This paper seeks to identify socio-scientific concepts from several disciplinary strands, mainly from political sciences, organization and management studies and sociology that are helpful for defining key players and for understanding their contribution to processes of change. Furthermore, the authors elucidate heuristically in how far the influence of the types “leader”, “intermediary” and “governance pioneer” can also be explained in terms of how they act in space and how they mobilize spatially distributed resources. Space, it is argued, can be understood as an object of change and as a resource in processes of change.

Keywords

  • Key players
  • Leadership
  • Intermediaries
  • Governance
  • Spatial constructs
access type Open Access

Promotors in Regional Innovation Systems – Three Examples from Northwest Germany

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 405 - 419

Abstract

Abstract

The organization of regional innovation systems is mostly complex and results not only from specific conditions on-site, but also from networking activities of individual actors. In this respect, economic development agencies play a key role, particularly as their responsibilities normally include the initiation and support of innovation processes. In order to ensure this, economic development agencies in practice often enter into joint collaboration with special innovation consultants. These actors are strongly interlinked with potential innovation partners enabling them to support innovation processes, especially in small and medium-sized enterprises. Due to this network capability, economists have established the role model of the relationship promotor which is in the focus of this paper. Taking the example of three regions in Northwest Germany, we analyze the function of economic development agencies and innovation consultants as relationship promotors and their specific strategies affecting the configuration of different innovation systems. It will be shown that the three regions – district of Oldenburg, Oldenburger Münsterland, Elbe-Weser region – adopt different strategies varying in terms of territorial dimension, range of actors and degree of networking. Basically, the configuration of regional innovation systems to a large extent depends on various sources of power of the operating promotors. Apart from three typical sources of power which can be found in the literature – social competence, networking knowledge, relationship patterns – the empirical analysis also reveals the reputation of relationship promotors as additional factor of being able to exert influence.

Keywords

  • Innovation systems
  • Relationship promotors
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Economic development
  • Northwest Germany
access type Open Access

Cluster Organizations in Praxis

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 421 - 436

Abstract

Abstract

Cluster organizations implement cluster policies and affect the outcome of them to a high degree. Their work is influenced by interactions with the promoted firms, political and other actors. A sound consultancy of cluster promotion should know these influences and take them seriously, because they shape the strengths, weaknesses and potentials of cluster organizations. This article examines how cluster organizations in Bavaria translate cluster theory into practical activities and how other actors influence them in the process. The influences are subdivided into institutional and structural factors. Institutional factors refer to social institutions that other actors impose on the organizations. It will be shown that these factors shape the work of cluster organizations to a high degree, but only seldom restrain it. The organizations positions and tasks within the wider economic promotion system constitute the structural factors. They confine the organizations towards networking activities and force them to cooperate with other promotional actors, if they want to provide a comprehensive cluster promotion.

Keywords

  • Cluster policy
  • Cluster organizations
  • Regional economic development
  • Bavaria
access type Open Access

Method of GIS-based-modelling analyzing Accessibility for Stroke Units

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 437 - 450

Abstract

Abstract

The methodologically-oriented paper presents a method for modeling supply areas and accessibility of stroke units in Germany with the use of geographic information systems (GIS). Based on OpenStreetMap-data vector routing based catchment areas of stroke units are analysed and blended with vector-based demographic data at a spatially disaggregated level. A modeling of temporal accessibility with rescue vehicles resulted in isochrone-maps. The intersection of these maps with high-resolution demographic attributed data offers different analysis options. These are demonstrated in a case study from Lower Franconia, which is to outline the potential of the method for the spatial planning of stroke units. An application of the method to other medical institutions or the intersection with other thematic attribute data is possible.

Keywords

  • Accessibility analysis
  • GIS
  • Healthcare
  • Stroke units
access type Open Access

Space and Traffic – A Field of Complex Interrelations. Can Interventions in the Built Environment Really Reduce Transport-Related Climate Emissions?

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 451 - 465

Abstract

Abstract

The image of an integrated urban and transport planning is linked to the hope for a turnaround in the mutual interrelations between the built environment and transport that have actually induced more transport to date. Planning interventions in location structures and transport supply should therefore effectively contribute to reduce transport-related climate emissions. However, the targeted design of mixed land-use and compact location structures on the local and regional level is superimposed by societal and spatial trends that make large-scale mobility politically desirable or necessary. Against this background, the hopes mentioned before appear widely overstated. In this paper we put well-known empirical findings in new contexts of interpretation, and we point to other – from our perspective, more important – drivers of transport trends that are beyond the scope of integrated urban and transport planning. We conclude that integrated urban and transport planning should not be justified by avoiding carbon dioxide emissions, but remains reasonable for other reasons.

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • Traffic
  • Spatial development
  • Reurbanisation
  • Climate protection
  • Traffic planning

Rezension

access type Open Access

Ansichtssache Stadtnatur. Zwischennutzungen und Naturverständnisse

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 467 - 469

Abstract

access type Open Access

Mikrokosmos Stadtviertel. Lokale Partizipation und Raumpolitik

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 471 - 473

Abstract

access type Open Access

Theorien in der Raum- und Stadtforschung. Einführungen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 475 - 476

Abstract

access type Open Access

Deutsche Raumplanung. Das Modell der „Zentralen Orte“ zwischen NS-Staat und Bundesrepublik

Published Online: 31 Oct 2016
Page range: 477 - 478

Abstract

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