Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 291 - 292

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Region Building in the Shadow of the Metropolitan Discourse. The Case Study of Südwestfalen (Southern Westphalia)

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 293 - 305

Abstract

Abstract

Since the mid-nineties, debates about spatial policy in Germany have been marked by a dominance of metropolitan discourses. Apparently these discourses are associated with a gradual shift of spatial policy priorities that more and more give up the primary goal of spatial cohesion in favor of a more competitive approach. In the course of the dominant metropolitan discourse especially regions at the edge of and between metropolitan areas are faced with an increasing pressure of regional profiling. With regard to the case study Südwestfalen the paper focuses on region building in the shadow of the metropolitan discourse. With reference to the Foucauldian concept of governmentality processes of region building and the formation of soft spaces are understood as expressions and means of neoliberal governmentality, and their underlying governmental rationalities and technologies are investigated. The empirical analysis reveals how dominant regional-economic rationalities, logics of inter-municipal cooperation and constraints of subsidy policies frame the process of region building on the discursive level. By analysing discourses and practices of regional marketing and measures of infrastructural self-services it is shown exemplary how contingent technologies of regional self-governance help to govern the process of region building on the collective level and simultaneously unfold subjectifying effects by providing patterns of social meaning and action.

Keywords

  • Region building
  • Regionalization
  • Soft spaces
  • Neoliberal governmentality
access type Open Access

Car driving in the context of changing gender relations – trends over three decades

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 307 - 321

Abstract

Abstract

This paper aims at answering the question, how the usage of cars both of men and women has changed in Germany in the context of changing gender relations during the last decades. Moreover, gender-specific differences in car usage are pointed out and their root causes are analysed based on German Travel Survey data. This is achieved by tracing the development of gender-specific car usage between 1976 and 2008 and interpreting the trends identified in a wider context of societal changes. The analyses conducted give results on whether gender-specific car usage results from social roles (e. g. labour participation), restrictions (e. g. lower car availability of women), economically rational household decisions on the car as a restricted resource, or gender-specific preferences. Beyond that it is shown how car usage has changed with respect to men and women with different characteristics (e. g. household motorization, labour participation, household type, municipality size). The results given in the paper show that convergence of men’s and women’s car usage predominantly results from an increasing women’s car usage. Regarding households where the number of drivers exceeds the number of available cars, i. e. the available cars are shared, we find a re-allocation of the scarce resource car between men and women. Yet, this trend varies: For example, women’s car usage increases stronger in small and in medium municipalities than in big cities. Furthermore, the results hint at gender-specific preferences: Even under very similar conditions such as full-time employment and unrestricted car availability, women use the car less often than men.

Keywords

  • Car use
  • Gender relation
  • Mobility trends
  • Preferences
  • Motorization
access type Open Access

Spaces and Power Lines

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 323 - 338

Abstract

Abstract

With its phase-out of nuclear power generation and the expansion of renewably sourced energy, the German energy transition (“Energiewende”) has radically changed existing power supply structures, with wide geographical repercussions. One aspect of this is changes within the being national power grid. Existing networks are to be upgraded and new long-distance power-lines built. This creates resistance and conflict. Against this background, our article investigates from a discourse theory perspective how power grid extensions and possible opposition are communicatively constructed, and what argumentation patterns dominate the discussion. The analyses undertaken here are based on a methodological mix of quantitativeoriented and qualitative elements that facilitates both the differentiation of central issues and detailed examination of individual aspects. In sum, the underlying need for grid extension and the technology involved on the one hand, and issues of health, local economies, natural environment, landscape, and participation in the decision-making process on the other hand, form central fields of conflict to be negotiated at cognitive, emotional and aesthetic levels of discourse.

Keywords

  • Energy transition
  • Renewable energies
  • Power grid extension
  • Discourse theory
  • Power
access type Open Access

Regional Distribution of Ambulant Nursing Services in Germany. A GIS Accessibility Analysis

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 339 - 359

Abstract

Abstract

In many rural areas in Europe a spatial concentrating of basic services can be observed due to interacting socioeconomic and demographic processes. At the European level, territorial cohesion policy aims at mitigating the consequences of this development. Additionally, in Germany, this development is a greatly discussed topic. However, little data exists at the country level on the dimensions and consequences of this spatial concentration process. This limitation makes it difficult to realistically assess the situation and identify the regions and basic services where intervention may be required. As a contribution to bridging this knowledge gap, we used a GIS accessibility analysis to analyse the regional distribution of ambulant nursing services throughout Germany and to estimate the availability of such services near patients’ places of residence. Ambulant nursing care is an important basic service of the German health care system; such services allow disabled or elderly people who are not able to fully care for themselves to stay in their homes and living environments. The analysis results lead us to conclude that although ambulant nursing services must cover greater distances to reach customers in rural areas, at present such services are nationally available in rural areas as well as in urban areas.

Keywords

  • Rural development
  • Medicare
  • Ambulant nursing services as defined in the German Social Code Book XI
  • Raster-based GIS-accessibility analysis
access type Open Access

Came to Stay for Good? Mobility Decisions of International Students in Germany from a Lifecourse Perspective

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 361 - 371

Abstract

Abstract

Against the background of demographic ageing in Germany, there are increasing attempts to attract high qualified labor force from abroad, and there is high interest to retain international students who graduate from German universities. Germany is an important destination country for international students, and the formal conditions for staying on and entering the labor market upon graduation were largely liberated during the past years. Survey results show a high interest for an extended stay in Germany among international students, but retention rates reveal that those intentions are only partly put into practice. This article investigates on this discrepancy. Using a qualitative case study, the attitudes, experiences and future plans of international students in Germany are analyzed focusing on possible intentions to stay for good. The analysis focuses on the question, how decisions to move or stay on are embedded in biographical status passages such as the transition from university to work life. The results show a strong impact of life cycle considerations with regards to future mobility decisions among the interviewees. Both previous and future migratory decisions are negotiated on the basis of a transnational action space, integrating rational argumentation as well as subjectivities and influences from peers and family members.

Keywords

  • Highly skilled migrants
  • Life cycle
  • Student migration
  • Stay decisions

Rezension

access type Open Access

Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekte

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 373 - 374

Abstract

access type Open Access

Imagineering Cultural Vienna. On the Semiotic Regulation of Vienna’s Culture-led Urban Transformation

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 375 - 377

Abstract

access type Open Access

Produktive Differenzen. Eine dynamische Netzwerkanalyse von Innovationsprozessen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 379 - 381

Abstract

access type Open Access

E-Mobility in Europe – Trends and Good Practice

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 383 - 385

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 291 - 292

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Region Building in the Shadow of the Metropolitan Discourse. The Case Study of Südwestfalen (Southern Westphalia)

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 293 - 305

Abstract

Abstract

Since the mid-nineties, debates about spatial policy in Germany have been marked by a dominance of metropolitan discourses. Apparently these discourses are associated with a gradual shift of spatial policy priorities that more and more give up the primary goal of spatial cohesion in favor of a more competitive approach. In the course of the dominant metropolitan discourse especially regions at the edge of and between metropolitan areas are faced with an increasing pressure of regional profiling. With regard to the case study Südwestfalen the paper focuses on region building in the shadow of the metropolitan discourse. With reference to the Foucauldian concept of governmentality processes of region building and the formation of soft spaces are understood as expressions and means of neoliberal governmentality, and their underlying governmental rationalities and technologies are investigated. The empirical analysis reveals how dominant regional-economic rationalities, logics of inter-municipal cooperation and constraints of subsidy policies frame the process of region building on the discursive level. By analysing discourses and practices of regional marketing and measures of infrastructural self-services it is shown exemplary how contingent technologies of regional self-governance help to govern the process of region building on the collective level and simultaneously unfold subjectifying effects by providing patterns of social meaning and action.

Keywords

  • Region building
  • Regionalization
  • Soft spaces
  • Neoliberal governmentality
access type Open Access

Car driving in the context of changing gender relations – trends over three decades

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 307 - 321

Abstract

Abstract

This paper aims at answering the question, how the usage of cars both of men and women has changed in Germany in the context of changing gender relations during the last decades. Moreover, gender-specific differences in car usage are pointed out and their root causes are analysed based on German Travel Survey data. This is achieved by tracing the development of gender-specific car usage between 1976 and 2008 and interpreting the trends identified in a wider context of societal changes. The analyses conducted give results on whether gender-specific car usage results from social roles (e. g. labour participation), restrictions (e. g. lower car availability of women), economically rational household decisions on the car as a restricted resource, or gender-specific preferences. Beyond that it is shown how car usage has changed with respect to men and women with different characteristics (e. g. household motorization, labour participation, household type, municipality size). The results given in the paper show that convergence of men’s and women’s car usage predominantly results from an increasing women’s car usage. Regarding households where the number of drivers exceeds the number of available cars, i. e. the available cars are shared, we find a re-allocation of the scarce resource car between men and women. Yet, this trend varies: For example, women’s car usage increases stronger in small and in medium municipalities than in big cities. Furthermore, the results hint at gender-specific preferences: Even under very similar conditions such as full-time employment and unrestricted car availability, women use the car less often than men.

Keywords

  • Car use
  • Gender relation
  • Mobility trends
  • Preferences
  • Motorization
access type Open Access

Spaces and Power Lines

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 323 - 338

Abstract

Abstract

With its phase-out of nuclear power generation and the expansion of renewably sourced energy, the German energy transition (“Energiewende”) has radically changed existing power supply structures, with wide geographical repercussions. One aspect of this is changes within the being national power grid. Existing networks are to be upgraded and new long-distance power-lines built. This creates resistance and conflict. Against this background, our article investigates from a discourse theory perspective how power grid extensions and possible opposition are communicatively constructed, and what argumentation patterns dominate the discussion. The analyses undertaken here are based on a methodological mix of quantitativeoriented and qualitative elements that facilitates both the differentiation of central issues and detailed examination of individual aspects. In sum, the underlying need for grid extension and the technology involved on the one hand, and issues of health, local economies, natural environment, landscape, and participation in the decision-making process on the other hand, form central fields of conflict to be negotiated at cognitive, emotional and aesthetic levels of discourse.

Keywords

  • Energy transition
  • Renewable energies
  • Power grid extension
  • Discourse theory
  • Power
access type Open Access

Regional Distribution of Ambulant Nursing Services in Germany. A GIS Accessibility Analysis

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 339 - 359

Abstract

Abstract

In many rural areas in Europe a spatial concentrating of basic services can be observed due to interacting socioeconomic and demographic processes. At the European level, territorial cohesion policy aims at mitigating the consequences of this development. Additionally, in Germany, this development is a greatly discussed topic. However, little data exists at the country level on the dimensions and consequences of this spatial concentration process. This limitation makes it difficult to realistically assess the situation and identify the regions and basic services where intervention may be required. As a contribution to bridging this knowledge gap, we used a GIS accessibility analysis to analyse the regional distribution of ambulant nursing services throughout Germany and to estimate the availability of such services near patients’ places of residence. Ambulant nursing care is an important basic service of the German health care system; such services allow disabled or elderly people who are not able to fully care for themselves to stay in their homes and living environments. The analysis results lead us to conclude that although ambulant nursing services must cover greater distances to reach customers in rural areas, at present such services are nationally available in rural areas as well as in urban areas.

Keywords

  • Rural development
  • Medicare
  • Ambulant nursing services as defined in the German Social Code Book XI
  • Raster-based GIS-accessibility analysis
access type Open Access

Came to Stay for Good? Mobility Decisions of International Students in Germany from a Lifecourse Perspective

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 361 - 371

Abstract

Abstract

Against the background of demographic ageing in Germany, there are increasing attempts to attract high qualified labor force from abroad, and there is high interest to retain international students who graduate from German universities. Germany is an important destination country for international students, and the formal conditions for staying on and entering the labor market upon graduation were largely liberated during the past years. Survey results show a high interest for an extended stay in Germany among international students, but retention rates reveal that those intentions are only partly put into practice. This article investigates on this discrepancy. Using a qualitative case study, the attitudes, experiences and future plans of international students in Germany are analyzed focusing on possible intentions to stay for good. The analysis focuses on the question, how decisions to move or stay on are embedded in biographical status passages such as the transition from university to work life. The results show a strong impact of life cycle considerations with regards to future mobility decisions among the interviewees. Both previous and future migratory decisions are negotiated on the basis of a transnational action space, integrating rational argumentation as well as subjectivities and influences from peers and family members.

Keywords

  • Highly skilled migrants
  • Life cycle
  • Student migration
  • Stay decisions

Rezension

access type Open Access

Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekte

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 373 - 374

Abstract

access type Open Access

Imagineering Cultural Vienna. On the Semiotic Regulation of Vienna’s Culture-led Urban Transformation

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 375 - 377

Abstract

access type Open Access

Produktive Differenzen. Eine dynamische Netzwerkanalyse von Innovationsprozessen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 379 - 381

Abstract

access type Open Access

E-Mobility in Europe – Trends and Good Practice

Published Online: 31 Aug 2016
Page range: 383 - 385

Abstract

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo