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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

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Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

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Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

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Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

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Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

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Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 1 - 2

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

Net Fiscal Flows and the Size of Cities

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 3 - 7

Abstract

Abstract

Which regions contribute most to national growth? Do large cities ‘need’ more expenditure per capita? The relation between these two questions is the subject of a current German discussion, but it is of importance for other countries as well. What precisely is the issue? The substantial German fiscal equalization systems between states (Länder) and between communities assign estimates of higher expenditure need per capita to larger cities. This paper argues that this is justified, because, following the arguments of new regional economics, the modern agglomerations are of crucial importance for national growth. To maintain this role they have to be able to keep or receive enough public finance. To assess this, total public flows out of and into regions have to be taken into account. The relevant analysis shows that their contribution to upperlevel (federal and Länder) finances is far above average, but that they receive relatively little from federal and Länder spending; consequently they experience large net fiscal outflows. The use of the abovementioned progressive scale of expenditure need in the equalization systems reduces this fiscal siphoning-off, at least to some extent.

Keywords

  • Fiscal flows
  • Expenditure need
  • Regional economics
  • Convergence theory
  • Regional progressivity
  • Settlement structure

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Climate Change Adaptation in Regional Planning—A Germany-Wide Analysis on the State of Implementation of Adaptation-Relevant Regional Plan Contents

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 9 - 21

Abstract

Abstract

Since the publication of the German Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change there has been scientific and planning political consensus on the ability of regional planning to implement climate change adaptation contents. To which extent the formal regional spatial planning meets this ability, is the key issue of this article. The analysis is a census for the regional planning territories of Germany. Their regional plans are examined regarding the presence and bindingness of adaptation-relevant designations. The action plan of spatial planning on prevention, mitigation and adaptation strategies with regard to the spatial consequences of climate change of the Conference of Ministers on Spatial Planning and its seven adaptation-related fields of action serve as a basis for the analysis. As a result, the state of implementation of adaptation-relevant regional plan contents is presented—both for each field of action as well as comprehensively. Furthermore, the results are reflected and further adaptation potentials are presented.

Keywords

  • Regional planning
  • Climate change
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Adaptation
  • Adaptive capacity
  • Germany
access type Open Access

Urban riverscapes as integrated field of planning—coordination and cooperation and the influence of planning practice

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 23 - 38

Abstract

Abstract

In urban riverscapes different significant land uses and interests come together, for instance flood protection, environmental protection, tourism or local recreation, nature or monument conservation, waterfront development or climate change mitigation. Accordingly, planning for integrated spatial developments is required for which actors of different administrative units need to collaborate. This paper first shows the institutional requirements for a collaborative approach in riverscapes. Therefore the administrative organization and the legally based objectives and planning instruments are analyzed. Based on planning culture as analytical perspective, further informal and more cultural influence factors of cooperation are included. Following the examples of integrated development planning in the riverscapes of Nuremberg and Ratisbon, some interesting characteristics of two key organizations—water management authorities and city administrations—were pointed out by highlighting their guiding principles, their organization-specific perceptions, and validations as well as their particular self-conception. It becomes apparent, that the so called common process paradigm—how the cooperation in urban riverscapes is implemented—plays a crucial role in the way planning processes take place. Last but not least it influences the spatial development and design itself. Relevant parameters for designing and steering integrated planning processes are identified.

Keywords

  • Integrated spatial planning
  • Water management
  • Urban planning
  • Cooperation
  • Planning culture

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Analysing Local Energy Conflicts: Outline of an Analysis Tool

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 39 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

The success of the German energy transition is highly depending on developments at the local level. However, these local transitions towards a sustainable energy supply do not always run smoothly. Instead, their implementation is often troubled by local conflicts over renewable energy and new grid infrastructures. The question of public acceptance is linked to more fundamental questions such as the underlying objectives of their deployment as well as who benefits from these new facilities. These issues refer to more complex debates and negotiations on the public interest and new forms of organisations for power supply. This paper presents a tool for the analysis of local energy conflicts with special consideration of a notion of public interest and new forms of organisation. The tool links different strands of debate in the social sciences—regarding conflicts, modes of organisation and public interests—and relates them to material, spatial, temporal and actor-based issues of the energy transition. The analysis tool therefore allows an integrative reflection of energy conflicts, which has never been used in his combination so far.

Keywords

  • Energy transition
  • Conflict analysis
  • Public interest
  • New forms of organisation
access type Open Access

GPS Tracking at Tourist Destinations—A New Software for the Analysis of Tourist Mobility Behavior Illustrated by Hikers in the Harz Mountains

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 51 - 68

Abstract

Abstract

There is a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods available to analyze the mobility behavior of people, and GPS tracking has evolved into a major tool to investigate tourism mobility behavior. For example, the use of GPS data loggers enables the recording and analysis of routes and time-space movements of participants. Through the combination of research tools, additional data can be collected, such as activities at the Point of Interest (PoI), motivations (e.g., for spending time at a specific PoI), demographic data and visitor satisfaction. An Android Application for tablets developed by the Harz University allows the link between complementary data-collection tools: GPS tracking and face-to-face surveys. The software GimToP (GTK) enables the researcher to collect data in-situ, and subsequently displays specific results (e.g., track, distance, breaks) in an interactive map. This way, respondents can be asked to provide data during their experience at various track points, which represents a new and significant tool to understand the mobility and spacetime behavior of a variety of respondent groups, such as hikers, city tourists, as well as visitors of leisure facilities or tourist attractions. This presentation will introduce the most important goals and opportunities of this new software, underpinned by a case study presenting the used GTK for hikers in the Harz Mountains.

Keywords

  • Mobility analysis
  • GPS tracking
  • Tourist mobility behavior
  • Android application
  • Geographic information systems

Rezension

access type Open Access

Regionale Planung im Ruhrgebiet. Von Robert Schmidt lernen?

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 69 - 72

Abstract

access type Open Access

Erhaltende Stadterneuerung. Ein Programm für das 21. Jahrhundert

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 73 - 74

Abstract

access type Open Access

Daseinsvorsorge in der Raumentwicklung. Sicherung – Steuerung – Vernetzung – Qualitäten

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 75 - 76

Abstract

Danksagung

access type Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2015

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 77 - 79

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 1 - 2

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

Net Fiscal Flows and the Size of Cities

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 3 - 7

Abstract

Abstract

Which regions contribute most to national growth? Do large cities ‘need’ more expenditure per capita? The relation between these two questions is the subject of a current German discussion, but it is of importance for other countries as well. What precisely is the issue? The substantial German fiscal equalization systems between states (Länder) and between communities assign estimates of higher expenditure need per capita to larger cities. This paper argues that this is justified, because, following the arguments of new regional economics, the modern agglomerations are of crucial importance for national growth. To maintain this role they have to be able to keep or receive enough public finance. To assess this, total public flows out of and into regions have to be taken into account. The relevant analysis shows that their contribution to upperlevel (federal and Länder) finances is far above average, but that they receive relatively little from federal and Länder spending; consequently they experience large net fiscal outflows. The use of the abovementioned progressive scale of expenditure need in the equalization systems reduces this fiscal siphoning-off, at least to some extent.

Keywords

  • Fiscal flows
  • Expenditure need
  • Regional economics
  • Convergence theory
  • Regional progressivity
  • Settlement structure

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Climate Change Adaptation in Regional Planning—A Germany-Wide Analysis on the State of Implementation of Adaptation-Relevant Regional Plan Contents

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 9 - 21

Abstract

Abstract

Since the publication of the German Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change there has been scientific and planning political consensus on the ability of regional planning to implement climate change adaptation contents. To which extent the formal regional spatial planning meets this ability, is the key issue of this article. The analysis is a census for the regional planning territories of Germany. Their regional plans are examined regarding the presence and bindingness of adaptation-relevant designations. The action plan of spatial planning on prevention, mitigation and adaptation strategies with regard to the spatial consequences of climate change of the Conference of Ministers on Spatial Planning and its seven adaptation-related fields of action serve as a basis for the analysis. As a result, the state of implementation of adaptation-relevant regional plan contents is presented—both for each field of action as well as comprehensively. Furthermore, the results are reflected and further adaptation potentials are presented.

Keywords

  • Regional planning
  • Climate change
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Adaptation
  • Adaptive capacity
  • Germany
access type Open Access

Urban riverscapes as integrated field of planning—coordination and cooperation and the influence of planning practice

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 23 - 38

Abstract

Abstract

In urban riverscapes different significant land uses and interests come together, for instance flood protection, environmental protection, tourism or local recreation, nature or monument conservation, waterfront development or climate change mitigation. Accordingly, planning for integrated spatial developments is required for which actors of different administrative units need to collaborate. This paper first shows the institutional requirements for a collaborative approach in riverscapes. Therefore the administrative organization and the legally based objectives and planning instruments are analyzed. Based on planning culture as analytical perspective, further informal and more cultural influence factors of cooperation are included. Following the examples of integrated development planning in the riverscapes of Nuremberg and Ratisbon, some interesting characteristics of two key organizations—water management authorities and city administrations—were pointed out by highlighting their guiding principles, their organization-specific perceptions, and validations as well as their particular self-conception. It becomes apparent, that the so called common process paradigm—how the cooperation in urban riverscapes is implemented—plays a crucial role in the way planning processes take place. Last but not least it influences the spatial development and design itself. Relevant parameters for designing and steering integrated planning processes are identified.

Keywords

  • Integrated spatial planning
  • Water management
  • Urban planning
  • Cooperation
  • Planning culture

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Analysing Local Energy Conflicts: Outline of an Analysis Tool

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 39 - 49

Abstract

Abstract

The success of the German energy transition is highly depending on developments at the local level. However, these local transitions towards a sustainable energy supply do not always run smoothly. Instead, their implementation is often troubled by local conflicts over renewable energy and new grid infrastructures. The question of public acceptance is linked to more fundamental questions such as the underlying objectives of their deployment as well as who benefits from these new facilities. These issues refer to more complex debates and negotiations on the public interest and new forms of organisations for power supply. This paper presents a tool for the analysis of local energy conflicts with special consideration of a notion of public interest and new forms of organisation. The tool links different strands of debate in the social sciences—regarding conflicts, modes of organisation and public interests—and relates them to material, spatial, temporal and actor-based issues of the energy transition. The analysis tool therefore allows an integrative reflection of energy conflicts, which has never been used in his combination so far.

Keywords

  • Energy transition
  • Conflict analysis
  • Public interest
  • New forms of organisation
access type Open Access

GPS Tracking at Tourist Destinations—A New Software for the Analysis of Tourist Mobility Behavior Illustrated by Hikers in the Harz Mountains

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 51 - 68

Abstract

Abstract

There is a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods available to analyze the mobility behavior of people, and GPS tracking has evolved into a major tool to investigate tourism mobility behavior. For example, the use of GPS data loggers enables the recording and analysis of routes and time-space movements of participants. Through the combination of research tools, additional data can be collected, such as activities at the Point of Interest (PoI), motivations (e.g., for spending time at a specific PoI), demographic data and visitor satisfaction. An Android Application for tablets developed by the Harz University allows the link between complementary data-collection tools: GPS tracking and face-to-face surveys. The software GimToP (GTK) enables the researcher to collect data in-situ, and subsequently displays specific results (e.g., track, distance, breaks) in an interactive map. This way, respondents can be asked to provide data during their experience at various track points, which represents a new and significant tool to understand the mobility and spacetime behavior of a variety of respondent groups, such as hikers, city tourists, as well as visitors of leisure facilities or tourist attractions. This presentation will introduce the most important goals and opportunities of this new software, underpinned by a case study presenting the used GTK for hikers in the Harz Mountains.

Keywords

  • Mobility analysis
  • GPS tracking
  • Tourist mobility behavior
  • Android application
  • Geographic information systems

Rezension

access type Open Access

Regionale Planung im Ruhrgebiet. Von Robert Schmidt lernen?

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 69 - 72

Abstract

access type Open Access

Erhaltende Stadterneuerung. Ein Programm für das 21. Jahrhundert

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 73 - 74

Abstract

access type Open Access

Daseinsvorsorge in der Raumentwicklung. Sicherung – Steuerung – Vernetzung – Qualitäten

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 75 - 76

Abstract

Danksagung

access type Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2015

Published Online: 28 Feb 2016
Page range: 77 - 79

Abstract

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