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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 375 - 376

Abstract

Wissenschaelicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Consequences of Demographic Change for Regional Population Dynamics in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 407 - 421

Abstract

Abstract

Regional consequences of demographic change in Germany, the future ageing and the shrinking of the population, strongly depend on the development of internal migration. Based on current trends, it cannot be predicted how this will change under conditions of aging and population shrinking. Though they only reach until the 2030s, recent model calculations indicate that competition between places of residence will increase and that regional disparities of population development will further intensify in the future. Based on forward projections of previous trends, these model calculations tend to present the long-term population development in suburban and rural regions—which have in parts strongly benefited from internal migration—rather too positively.

The model calculation presented in this study is based on the assumption, that for differentiating population growth by internal migration, there have been other patterns in the past than this will be the case for the future, in which the population will decline in total. Based on a concentration of an expected long-term decline of the population in less attractive, structurally weak regions the model calculation shows, that beyond 2030 even such rural and suburban regions will experience a substantial population decline which still have, according to current trends, comparatively positive perspectives.

Keywords

  • Demographic change
  • Internal migration
  • Regional population dynamic
  • Population projection
  • Population decline
  • Ageing
access type Open Access

Integrated Urban Development and Sustainable Mobility Planing – The Case of the City of Leipzig

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 423 - 437

Abstract

Abstract

Many cities in Germany are currently facing complex economic, ecological and social problems that cannot be resolved with traditional, departmentalized planning concepts. Integrated urban development concepts are therefore in high demand. However, the planning approaches associated with such integrated concepts hardly provide immediately applicable strategies. In this context, the paper discusses approaches for sustainablemobility oriented urban development, using the German city of Leipzig as an example. Building on previous findings, the paper presents infrastructure-based concepts for advancing inner-city living, strengthening urban centres and promoting local mass transit. In addition, political, organizational and communicative courses of action will be demonstrated. Those measures include steps for improving the wider basic planning framework, concepts for strengthening inter- and intra-communal cooperation as well as integrated urban mobility concepts. The example of Leipzig shows clearly that infrastructure-based approaches are insufficient for sustainable-mobility oriented urban development. Rather, urban and transit planning needs to be much more attuned to the needs of the general public. This includes the integration of measures for mobility management with urban transit concepts. Finally, a political and legal framework focusing on sustainability goals, and a stronger consideration of regional links in urban planning are necessary for a more effective transformation of integrated urban development concepts.

Keywords

  • Integrated urban planning
  • Compact city
  • Sustainable urban development
  • Urban planning
  • Transportation planning
access type Open Access

The Dwelling Panel – A New Research Method for Studying Urban Change

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 377 - 388

Abstract

Abstract

Classical panel studies, such as the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), and the British Household Panel Study (BHPS), are based either on households or persons in households. Any attempts to break down such data into smaller spatial units such as neighbourhoods, due migration and changes in a specific sample can only be described by the stayers and the out-movers. With the exception of new members in stayer households, there is no information on households moving into a given neighbourhood. Consequently, when using classical panel data, it is not possible to analyse appropriately changes in small areas.

In order to solve the problem of population changes in small spatial units such as neighbourhoods, we recommend using an alternative sampling unit: instead of households, we suggest focusing on dwellings and houses. The dwelling panel allows us to examine processes, such as gentrification, poverty and voting behaviour in small urban areas.

Drawing on an ongoing study, we shall discuss methodological issues and show how a dwelling panel can be constructed and maintained in several waves. In the process, we shall discuss panel attrition and compare possible replacement strategies in classical panels with those in dwelling panels.

Keywords

  • Dwelling
  • Panel study
  • Urban research
  • Neighbourhoods
  • Methodology
  • Cologne

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Interplay of Space and Technology. The Case of Renewable Energy in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 389 - 405

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of the German Energy Transition (“Energiewende”) at the social and particularly at the spatial level. The paper uses a concept of space that acknowledges the role of new technology. The approach differentiates between environmental spaces, spaces of conventional energy production and renewable energy production. Additionally, it addresses the question what happens when renewable energy technology meets space. The analysis addresses three key issues:

• Hybridization: Do technology, individuals and nature form an inseparable unit, which cannot (anymore) be separated?

• Disintegration of counter-spaces: Do renewable energies lead to a disintegration of the clear distinction between technological spaces and their environment?

• Design of space: Which possibilities of collaboration and participation exist for the local population?

Furthermore, the paper investigates socio-spatial landscape outcomes that are affected by technological change. As well equally direct and indirect impacts of technology on human action are separated. Both aspects are important for the implementation of renewable energy in Germany. Wind turbines are installed at specific sites which are connected to a meaning, a use or an identity. Technology affects people in their everyday routines by its visual perception and its non-material value.

The paper demonstrates different meanings of space concerning symbols of new technologies in varying contexts, e.g. the installation of a large number of wind turbines shapes landscapes. Theoretical reflections draw on the concept of the inclusion of technology from Bruno Latour and the determination of 'Other Spaces' from Michel Foucault. Practical issues related to the Energy Transition are discussed using case studies on wind energy deployment and grid expansion in Germany as an example.

The paper aims at discussing the idea of an increased hybridization of nature and technology due to the growing use of renewable energy. A theoretical framework of socio-technological change of societies is developed to understand the current discourse on the German Energy Transition.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Space and technology
  • Heterotopias
  • Hybridization
  • Collaborative action

Rezension

access type Open Access

Räumliche Auswirkungen der internationalen Migration

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 439 - 440

Abstract

access type Open Access

Klima, Raum und Zeit im Wandel. Eine ethnographische Untersuchung von Adaptionen und Konflikten auf der westfriesischen Insel Ameland

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 441 - 443

Abstract

access type Open Access

Kulturlandschaftspolitik. Die gesellschaftliche Konstituierung von Kulturlandschaft durch Institutionen und Governance

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 445 - 446

Abstract

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 375 - 376

Abstract

Wissenschaelicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Consequences of Demographic Change for Regional Population Dynamics in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 407 - 421

Abstract

Abstract

Regional consequences of demographic change in Germany, the future ageing and the shrinking of the population, strongly depend on the development of internal migration. Based on current trends, it cannot be predicted how this will change under conditions of aging and population shrinking. Though they only reach until the 2030s, recent model calculations indicate that competition between places of residence will increase and that regional disparities of population development will further intensify in the future. Based on forward projections of previous trends, these model calculations tend to present the long-term population development in suburban and rural regions—which have in parts strongly benefited from internal migration—rather too positively.

The model calculation presented in this study is based on the assumption, that for differentiating population growth by internal migration, there have been other patterns in the past than this will be the case for the future, in which the population will decline in total. Based on a concentration of an expected long-term decline of the population in less attractive, structurally weak regions the model calculation shows, that beyond 2030 even such rural and suburban regions will experience a substantial population decline which still have, according to current trends, comparatively positive perspectives.

Keywords

  • Demographic change
  • Internal migration
  • Regional population dynamic
  • Population projection
  • Population decline
  • Ageing
access type Open Access

Integrated Urban Development and Sustainable Mobility Planing – The Case of the City of Leipzig

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 423 - 437

Abstract

Abstract

Many cities in Germany are currently facing complex economic, ecological and social problems that cannot be resolved with traditional, departmentalized planning concepts. Integrated urban development concepts are therefore in high demand. However, the planning approaches associated with such integrated concepts hardly provide immediately applicable strategies. In this context, the paper discusses approaches for sustainablemobility oriented urban development, using the German city of Leipzig as an example. Building on previous findings, the paper presents infrastructure-based concepts for advancing inner-city living, strengthening urban centres and promoting local mass transit. In addition, political, organizational and communicative courses of action will be demonstrated. Those measures include steps for improving the wider basic planning framework, concepts for strengthening inter- and intra-communal cooperation as well as integrated urban mobility concepts. The example of Leipzig shows clearly that infrastructure-based approaches are insufficient for sustainable-mobility oriented urban development. Rather, urban and transit planning needs to be much more attuned to the needs of the general public. This includes the integration of measures for mobility management with urban transit concepts. Finally, a political and legal framework focusing on sustainability goals, and a stronger consideration of regional links in urban planning are necessary for a more effective transformation of integrated urban development concepts.

Keywords

  • Integrated urban planning
  • Compact city
  • Sustainable urban development
  • Urban planning
  • Transportation planning
access type Open Access

The Dwelling Panel – A New Research Method for Studying Urban Change

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 377 - 388

Abstract

Abstract

Classical panel studies, such as the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), and the British Household Panel Study (BHPS), are based either on households or persons in households. Any attempts to break down such data into smaller spatial units such as neighbourhoods, due migration and changes in a specific sample can only be described by the stayers and the out-movers. With the exception of new members in stayer households, there is no information on households moving into a given neighbourhood. Consequently, when using classical panel data, it is not possible to analyse appropriately changes in small areas.

In order to solve the problem of population changes in small spatial units such as neighbourhoods, we recommend using an alternative sampling unit: instead of households, we suggest focusing on dwellings and houses. The dwelling panel allows us to examine processes, such as gentrification, poverty and voting behaviour in small urban areas.

Drawing on an ongoing study, we shall discuss methodological issues and show how a dwelling panel can be constructed and maintained in several waves. In the process, we shall discuss panel attrition and compare possible replacement strategies in classical panels with those in dwelling panels.

Keywords

  • Dwelling
  • Panel study
  • Urban research
  • Neighbourhoods
  • Methodology
  • Cologne

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Interplay of Space and Technology. The Case of Renewable Energy in Germany

Published Online: 31 Dec 2015
Page range: 389 - 405

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of the German Energy Transition (“Energiewende”) at the social and particularly at the spatial level. The paper uses a concept of space that acknowledges the role of new technology. The approach differentiates between environmental spaces, spaces of conventional energy production and renewable energy production. Additionally, it addresses the question what happens when renewable energy technology meets space. The analysis addresses three key issues:

• Hybridization: Do technology, individuals and nature form an inseparable unit, which cannot (anymore) be separated?

• Disintegration of counter-spaces: Do renewable energies lead to a disintegration of the clear distinction between technological spaces and their environment?

• Design of space: Which possibilities of collaboration and participation exist for the local population?

Furthermore, the paper investigates socio-spatial landscape outcomes that are affected by technological change. As well equally direct and indirect impacts of technology on human action are separated. Both aspects are important for the implementation of renewable energy in Germany. Wind turbines are installed at specific sites which are connected to a meaning, a use or an identity. Technology affects people in their everyday routines by its visual perception and its non-material value.

The paper demonstrates different meanings of space concerning symbols of new technologies in varying contexts, e.g. the installation of a large number of wind turbines shapes landscapes. Theoretical reflections draw on the concept of the inclusion of technology from Bruno Latour and the determination of 'Other Spaces' from Michel Foucault. Practical issues related to the Energy Transition are discussed using case studies on wind energy deployment and grid expansion in Germany as an example.

The paper aims at discussing the idea of an increased hybridization of nature and technology due to the growing use of renewable energy. A theoretical framework of socio-technological change of societies is developed to understand the current discourse on the German Energy Transition.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Space and technology
  • Heterotopias
  • Hybridization
  • Collaborative action

Rezension

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