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AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Housing Vacancy in Germany. On the Conceptualization of a Key Indicator for Housing Monitoring by Using Data from the German Housing Census (GWZ) 2011

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 311 - 325

Abstract

Abstract

At present the housing market in Germany is characterized by contrary trends: Strained markets with partly distinct housing shortage are facing each other with relieved markets even with very high vacancies. For both situations the vacancy rate is a decisive indicator for evaluation. However, the vacancy rate so far is not systematically investigated and elaborated as an indicator but rather is quantified and qualified differently by various scientific and political debates. Against this background the paper suggests a systematic categorization of vacancy rates based on relevant literature. Additionally it develops a heuristic for a differentiated evaluation of housing vacancy rates from different perspectives. This heuristic is then backed up empirically by data from the building and housing census (GWZ) 2011. Thus, it can be demonstrated that the majority of German municipalities has indeed a moderate vacancy rate between 3 and 5 %, but also that substantially regional and spatial-structural differences appear. In respect of the analysis of vacancy rates no spatially-extensive generalization or simple conclusions for housing and urban renewal policies can be drawn. This underlines that a qualification of vacancy rates is necessary in order to be utilized for planning and political decisions.

Keywords

  • Housing vacancy
  • Housing market monitoring
  • Building and housing census
  • Indicator
access type Open Access

The Economic Impact of the Public Universities in the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 327 - 342

Abstract

Abstract

The assessment of the economic impact of universities has received increasing political attention when it comes to the justification of public expenditure on research and higher education. While regional impact analyses have been realized mostly at the local level and for individual higher education institutions, this article is the first to assess the monetary impact of an entire higher education landscape at the geographical scale of a large federal state in Germany. To increase the validity of the impact at such a geographical scale, the assessment responds to a number of methodological problems of impact studies: The approach used here deploys an extended multiplier analysis accounting for production and income multipliers simultaneously, analyses the differential incidence of universities vis-à-vis alternative uses of public funds, and extends the model to include expenses for the social insurance system. In addition, the validity of the impact analysis is based on concisely regionalised public expenses for all nine state universities in Baden-Württemberg. As a result, the universities in Baden-Württemberg account for an overall impact of nearly twice the basic federal funding. The differential analysis demonstrates that the allocation of public funds to alternative uses hardly reaches comparable regional effects. This study contributes to the advancement of economic impact analysis of higher education landscapes at larger geographic scales rather than individual universities in their local contexts.

Keywords

  • Regional economic impact analysis
  • Higher education
  • Baden-Württemberg
  • Differential incidence analysis
  • Regional multiplier analysis

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Effects of a Technical Paradigm Change on the Organization of Water Management in Structurally Weak Rural Areas

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 343 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

Structurally weak rural areas in Germany partially are confronted with enormous challenges. It is becoming increasingly difficult to provide these regions with an adequate infrastructure to secure equivalent living conditions. Alternative concepts such as New Sanitation Systems (NASS) can offer an essential contribution. The main idea of NASS is the driving of resources within urban water circular paths. Therefore a separated collection of waste water flows through a technical re-design of infrastructure systems becomes necessary. Winning and utilizing resources offers a new perspective of value adding for urban water management.

The paper addresses the organizational problems regarding the background and deficits of conventional sewage systems. Especially in the context of important changes, such as demographic development and climate change, new framework requirements for planning need to be taken into account. Therefore it is investigated which constraints and challenges influence the implementation of new technical and organizational solutions for sanitation systems.

Keywords

  • Urban and regional planning
  • Organization of water management and sanitation
  • New sanitation systems
  • Sewage systems
  • Structural change
  • Structurally weak rural areas
access type Open Access

Universities and Demographic Change—Trends and Options

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 357 - 368

Abstract

Abstract

What are the effects of the expected demographic development for universities? Our analysis shows that the expected demographic change will affect regions and universities quite differently according to their location, status, and size. A decreasing number of students could particularly endanger the existence of small universities of applied sciences in regions with pronounced population decline. The link between the number of population and the number of students in a region is, however, not very close due to the spatial mobility of students. Hence, competition for students between universities will play an increasing role.

Keywords

  • Universities
  • Demographic change
  • Students
  • Regional development

Rezension

access type Open Access

Zukunftsfähig durch Regionsbildung? Institutionenbildung in politisch-administrativen Verflechtungsräumen

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 369 - 370

Abstract

access type Open Access

Klima von unten. Regionale Governance und gesellschaftlicher Wandel

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 371 - 372

Abstract

access type Open Access

Looking Beyond The Dredges. The Consideration of Alternatives in the Planning and Approval of Port Development in Germany and New Zealand

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 373 - 374

Abstract

8 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Housing Vacancy in Germany. On the Conceptualization of a Key Indicator for Housing Monitoring by Using Data from the German Housing Census (GWZ) 2011

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 311 - 325

Abstract

Abstract

At present the housing market in Germany is characterized by contrary trends: Strained markets with partly distinct housing shortage are facing each other with relieved markets even with very high vacancies. For both situations the vacancy rate is a decisive indicator for evaluation. However, the vacancy rate so far is not systematically investigated and elaborated as an indicator but rather is quantified and qualified differently by various scientific and political debates. Against this background the paper suggests a systematic categorization of vacancy rates based on relevant literature. Additionally it develops a heuristic for a differentiated evaluation of housing vacancy rates from different perspectives. This heuristic is then backed up empirically by data from the building and housing census (GWZ) 2011. Thus, it can be demonstrated that the majority of German municipalities has indeed a moderate vacancy rate between 3 and 5 %, but also that substantially regional and spatial-structural differences appear. In respect of the analysis of vacancy rates no spatially-extensive generalization or simple conclusions for housing and urban renewal policies can be drawn. This underlines that a qualification of vacancy rates is necessary in order to be utilized for planning and political decisions.

Keywords

  • Housing vacancy
  • Housing market monitoring
  • Building and housing census
  • Indicator
access type Open Access

The Economic Impact of the Public Universities in the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 327 - 342

Abstract

Abstract

The assessment of the economic impact of universities has received increasing political attention when it comes to the justification of public expenditure on research and higher education. While regional impact analyses have been realized mostly at the local level and for individual higher education institutions, this article is the first to assess the monetary impact of an entire higher education landscape at the geographical scale of a large federal state in Germany. To increase the validity of the impact at such a geographical scale, the assessment responds to a number of methodological problems of impact studies: The approach used here deploys an extended multiplier analysis accounting for production and income multipliers simultaneously, analyses the differential incidence of universities vis-à-vis alternative uses of public funds, and extends the model to include expenses for the social insurance system. In addition, the validity of the impact analysis is based on concisely regionalised public expenses for all nine state universities in Baden-Württemberg. As a result, the universities in Baden-Württemberg account for an overall impact of nearly twice the basic federal funding. The differential analysis demonstrates that the allocation of public funds to alternative uses hardly reaches comparable regional effects. This study contributes to the advancement of economic impact analysis of higher education landscapes at larger geographic scales rather than individual universities in their local contexts.

Keywords

  • Regional economic impact analysis
  • Higher education
  • Baden-Württemberg
  • Differential incidence analysis
  • Regional multiplier analysis

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Effects of a Technical Paradigm Change on the Organization of Water Management in Structurally Weak Rural Areas

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 343 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

Structurally weak rural areas in Germany partially are confronted with enormous challenges. It is becoming increasingly difficult to provide these regions with an adequate infrastructure to secure equivalent living conditions. Alternative concepts such as New Sanitation Systems (NASS) can offer an essential contribution. The main idea of NASS is the driving of resources within urban water circular paths. Therefore a separated collection of waste water flows through a technical re-design of infrastructure systems becomes necessary. Winning and utilizing resources offers a new perspective of value adding for urban water management.

The paper addresses the organizational problems regarding the background and deficits of conventional sewage systems. Especially in the context of important changes, such as demographic development and climate change, new framework requirements for planning need to be taken into account. Therefore it is investigated which constraints and challenges influence the implementation of new technical and organizational solutions for sanitation systems.

Keywords

  • Urban and regional planning
  • Organization of water management and sanitation
  • New sanitation systems
  • Sewage systems
  • Structural change
  • Structurally weak rural areas
access type Open Access

Universities and Demographic Change—Trends and Options

Published Online: 31 Oct 2015
Page range: 357 - 368

Abstract

Abstract

What are the effects of the expected demographic development for universities? Our analysis shows that the expected demographic change will affect regions and universities quite differently according to their location, status, and size. A decreasing number of students could particularly endanger the existence of small universities of applied sciences in regions with pronounced population decline. The link between the number of population and the number of students in a region is, however, not very close due to the spatial mobility of students. Hence, competition for students between universities will play an increasing role.

Keywords

  • Universities
  • Demographic change
  • Students
  • Regional development

Rezension

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