Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Von zentralen Orten und inneren Städten

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 241 - 242

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

The Inner City as a Residential Area for the "Young Elderly"?

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 243 - 256

Abstract

Abstract

Is the inner city an attractive place for the ”young elderly” to live? During decades suburbanization was the dominant pattern of city development in Germany. However, since the 2000s an increasing attraction of urban living and the trend of re-urbanization are discussed in research as well as in public. Due to an increasing average age and life expectancy of the population as a main subprocess of demographic change in Germany, the question arises whether the inner city as a residential area also becomes more attractive for the elderly. Especially ”young elderly” people (ca. 50–70 years old) are getting into focus. Because of a transitional phase of their lives, they might show a greater willingness to change the residential location to adapt to their new needs.

In order to analyze the attractiveness of the inner city as a residential area for the ”young elderly”, residential location decisions, which were realized between 2010 and 2012, were investigated using the city of Bonn as an example. The results of a survey and in-depth interviews show that the inner city cannot be considered as a homogeneous space, but that small-scale differences in the attractiveness as a residential area exist. In summary, the ”young elderly” prefer the fringe of the inner city while the city center is important for their shopping and leisure activities, but not as attractive for them to live. However, also within the fringe of the inner city more and less attractive residential areas can be identified corresponding to lifestyle and income of the ”young elderly”.

Keywords

  • Residential location decisions
  • Re-Urbanization
  • ”Young elderly”
  • Inner city living
  • Inner city
Open Access

Mobility Dynamics and Knowledge Work: The Change of Job-Related Circular Mobility

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 257 - 268

Abstract

Abstract

An increasing importance of mobile and complex forms of working and living has been noticed in recent mobility research. These developments are closely linked to the socio-economic structural change toward a knowledge economy and to changes in the organization of employment. So far only few empirical results indicate that knowledge workers are more mobile than other employees. However, the relationship between knowledge-intensive activities and job-related—especially the so-called circular—mobility has not been systematically examined in-depth. Merging interdisciplinary mobility research with the spatial innovation and knowledge science seems to be a promising approach for utilizing synergy potentials that allow a more differentiated analysis of the fluid, spatiotemporal connection between knowledge work and its complex implications for the job-related circular mobility.

Keywords

  • Knowledge economy
  • Knowledge work
  • Job-related mobility
  • Time-space dynamic
Open Access

Real Estate Prices and the Emscher Conversion

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 269 - 283

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, research on the impact of regional policy interventions on real estate prices is rather scarce. Comprising an investment of more than € 4,5 billion over the period from 1991 to 2020, the ecological reconstruction of the Emscher river in the northern part of the Ruhr area is one of the largest infrastructural projects in Europe. This paper investigates on a small scale level whether the Emscher conversion affects real estate prices in the renewal area. The empirical analysis is based on georeferenced data on housing for sale and rent over the period from 2007 to 2011 provided by ImmobilienScout24, which have been enriched by additional georeferenced data. Price trends within the individual towns and cities of the conversion area ”Neues Emschertal” and in reference regions (Emscher region outside of conversion zone, Ruhr valley) are analysed using hedonic price functions. The results suggest that there are no significant effects of the Emscher reconstruction programme on local rents so far, whereas prices of dwellings for sale have performed more stable in parts of the Emscher conversion zone than in the reference regions, where prices have declined.

Keywords

  • Housing market
  • Hedonic price function
  • Spatial grids
  • Urban renewal
  • Emscher conversion
Open Access

Comparative Study on the Central Place Concepts of the German,and Recommendations for their Further Development

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 285 - 297

Abstract

Abstract

Central place concepts are an inherent part of all regional plans of the German federal states (the ’Länder’) These concepts have become increasingly important because regional plans need to be adapted to recent and future demographic changes in order to ensure an adequate provision of services of general interest. This paper analyses the current central place concepts of the Länder and gives recommendations for their further development.

The analysis shows that the Länder have developed different approaches in regard to central place concepts, both in terms of definitions, threshold levels of population and accessibility and also their function for guiding future regional development.

The paper gives recommendations on how to improve central place concepts and related plan approval procedures. Policy makers and planning authorities should define and seek political approval for overarching goals, from which key analytical indicators would be derived. These indicators should then be used for an empirical analysis, which would finally allow designating central places and their respective functions. Of course, the underlying methodology should be explained in detail within each regional plan.

A central place should not be designated on the basis of its current facilities and services, but on the basis of the specific demographic and spatial characteristics and requirements of the surrounding region. Thus two cities with similar central facilities could nevertheless be handled differently by a central place concept because their respective hinterlands have different needs for central places.

Keywords

  • Regional planning
  • Central places
  • Central place concepts
  • Validation

Rezension

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Von zentralen Orten und inneren Städten

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 241 - 242

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

The Inner City as a Residential Area for the "Young Elderly"?

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 243 - 256

Abstract

Abstract

Is the inner city an attractive place for the ”young elderly” to live? During decades suburbanization was the dominant pattern of city development in Germany. However, since the 2000s an increasing attraction of urban living and the trend of re-urbanization are discussed in research as well as in public. Due to an increasing average age and life expectancy of the population as a main subprocess of demographic change in Germany, the question arises whether the inner city as a residential area also becomes more attractive for the elderly. Especially ”young elderly” people (ca. 50–70 years old) are getting into focus. Because of a transitional phase of their lives, they might show a greater willingness to change the residential location to adapt to their new needs.

In order to analyze the attractiveness of the inner city as a residential area for the ”young elderly”, residential location decisions, which were realized between 2010 and 2012, were investigated using the city of Bonn as an example. The results of a survey and in-depth interviews show that the inner city cannot be considered as a homogeneous space, but that small-scale differences in the attractiveness as a residential area exist. In summary, the ”young elderly” prefer the fringe of the inner city while the city center is important for their shopping and leisure activities, but not as attractive for them to live. However, also within the fringe of the inner city more and less attractive residential areas can be identified corresponding to lifestyle and income of the ”young elderly”.

Keywords

  • Residential location decisions
  • Re-Urbanization
  • ”Young elderly”
  • Inner city living
  • Inner city
Open Access

Mobility Dynamics and Knowledge Work: The Change of Job-Related Circular Mobility

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 257 - 268

Abstract

Abstract

An increasing importance of mobile and complex forms of working and living has been noticed in recent mobility research. These developments are closely linked to the socio-economic structural change toward a knowledge economy and to changes in the organization of employment. So far only few empirical results indicate that knowledge workers are more mobile than other employees. However, the relationship between knowledge-intensive activities and job-related—especially the so-called circular—mobility has not been systematically examined in-depth. Merging interdisciplinary mobility research with the spatial innovation and knowledge science seems to be a promising approach for utilizing synergy potentials that allow a more differentiated analysis of the fluid, spatiotemporal connection between knowledge work and its complex implications for the job-related circular mobility.

Keywords

  • Knowledge economy
  • Knowledge work
  • Job-related mobility
  • Time-space dynamic
Open Access

Real Estate Prices and the Emscher Conversion

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 269 - 283

Abstract

Abstract

In Germany, research on the impact of regional policy interventions on real estate prices is rather scarce. Comprising an investment of more than € 4,5 billion over the period from 1991 to 2020, the ecological reconstruction of the Emscher river in the northern part of the Ruhr area is one of the largest infrastructural projects in Europe. This paper investigates on a small scale level whether the Emscher conversion affects real estate prices in the renewal area. The empirical analysis is based on georeferenced data on housing for sale and rent over the period from 2007 to 2011 provided by ImmobilienScout24, which have been enriched by additional georeferenced data. Price trends within the individual towns and cities of the conversion area ”Neues Emschertal” and in reference regions (Emscher region outside of conversion zone, Ruhr valley) are analysed using hedonic price functions. The results suggest that there are no significant effects of the Emscher reconstruction programme on local rents so far, whereas prices of dwellings for sale have performed more stable in parts of the Emscher conversion zone than in the reference regions, where prices have declined.

Keywords

  • Housing market
  • Hedonic price function
  • Spatial grids
  • Urban renewal
  • Emscher conversion
Open Access

Comparative Study on the Central Place Concepts of the German,and Recommendations for their Further Development

Published Online: 31 Aug 2015
Page range: 285 - 297

Abstract

Abstract

Central place concepts are an inherent part of all regional plans of the German federal states (the ’Länder’) These concepts have become increasingly important because regional plans need to be adapted to recent and future demographic changes in order to ensure an adequate provision of services of general interest. This paper analyses the current central place concepts of the Länder and gives recommendations for their further development.

The analysis shows that the Länder have developed different approaches in regard to central place concepts, both in terms of definitions, threshold levels of population and accessibility and also their function for guiding future regional development.

The paper gives recommendations on how to improve central place concepts and related plan approval procedures. Policy makers and planning authorities should define and seek political approval for overarching goals, from which key analytical indicators would be derived. These indicators should then be used for an empirical analysis, which would finally allow designating central places and their respective functions. Of course, the underlying methodology should be explained in detail within each regional plan.

A central place should not be designated on the basis of its current facilities and services, but on the basis of the specific demographic and spatial characteristics and requirements of the surrounding region. Thus two cities with similar central facilities could nevertheless be handled differently by a central place concept because their respective hinterlands have different needs for central places.

Keywords

  • Regional planning
  • Central places
  • Central place concepts
  • Validation

Rezension

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