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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

„Doing spatial research“

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 153 - 154

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

On the Evaluation of Knowledge Generation and Knowledge Transfer within the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) – Leibniz-Forum for Spatial Sciences

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 155 - 165

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the conditions for transdisciplinary knowledge creation and transfer of knowledge in general using the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) as an example. Based on a consideration of differences between practice-oriented and transdisciplinary research the paper discusses the role of science and practice and their relationship. It emphasises the need for a transdisciplinary dialogue including all relevant scientific disciplines and stakeholders for addressing major societal challenges. When scrutinizing the current evaluation practice of the Leibniz Association it can be shown that the tracing of impacts generated in discursive and applied research processes is a challenging task. Subsequently we discuss how the ARL—with its inherent tension between different scientific disciplines and the application-oriented planning practice—and other "non typical scientific institutes" can be evaluated. Based upon this, recommendations are given for further development of mechanisms to evaluate scientific institutions, in particular with regard to knowledge transfer and transdisciplinary research.

Keywords

  • Knowledge generation
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Transdisciplinarity
  • Evaluation
  • Spatial planning

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Polycentrism in Germany: A Comparative Study for Three City Regions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 167 - 183

Abstract

Abstract

The article takes up the current debate on polycentric urban areas as well as it visualizes the recent patterns of urban development by comparing the three city regions Cologne/Bonn, the eastern Ruhr area and Leipzig/Halle. For this purpose three maps showing the central functional cores, the separation of residential areas and commuting flows are presented and further explained. It shows that the spatial patterns of the three urban regions result from long-term development to which the traditional cores of settlements are still of high importance regarding the city regions. The dissolving of cities towards dispersed urban areas is only visible rudimentarily.

Keywords

  • Polycentric city region
  • Visualisation
  • Spatial development
  • Post-suburbanisation
  • Germany
  • Comparative urban research
access type Open Access

Medium-Sized Cities as Peripheral Centers: Cooperation, Competition and Hierarchy in Shrinking Regions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 185 - 202

Abstract

Abstract

Research and policy assume that inter-municipal cooperation is necessary to strengthen the role of medium-sized cities as regional centers in shrinking and peripheral regions and to ensure that services of general interest are maintained. Against this background, the article examines how medium-sized cities manage to position themselves in peripheral regions between the poles of re-centralization and peripheralisation. We discuss how inter-municipal cooperation, competition and hierarchies interact. Using the concept of Regional Governance as a framework for the analysis the questions are investigated empirically based on two case studies: firstly, using the example of the city triangle Altmark (Saxony-Anhalt), which is a polycentric network of cities, consisting of the city of Stendal and two neighbouring towns. Secondly, the location initiative Southwest-Pfalz (Rheinland-Pfalz) is scrutinized, an urban-rural cooperation between the city of Pirmasens and the district Southwest-Pfalz. The results indicate that both the pressure for cooperation and the need for competition are increasing for local actors. Finally we assume that inter-municipal cooperation only works under specific conditions and draw conclusions for regional planning, state and urban policy.

Keywords

  • Peripheralisation
  • Re-centralization
  • Medium-sized cities
  • Inter-municipal cooperation
  • Competition
  • Hierarchy
access type Open Access

Doing Online Surveys in Socio-scientific Regional Studies: Issues and Experiences

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 203 - 217

Abstract

Abstract

Empirical social research made use of online surveys since the mid-1990s. However, there is no significant methodological debate about this empirical tool in socio-scientific regional studies. In this paper, we delineate the online survey methodology, their advantages and disadvantages as well as potential contexts of application. Online surveys are useful especially for explorative and experimental quantitative research projects that deal with complex and new socio-spatial phenomena. Based on these observations, we will present practical experience with online survey research from three projects in the field of socio-scientific regional studies. We will focus on questionnaire design, sampling and technical solutions. The results show that particularly for studies on highly mobile social groups online surveys are an appropriate and powerful tool for data collection. Given that mobility and multilocality are more and more characterizing our societies and thus impact spatial structures, we argue that online surveys are underused as a method for the exploration of new trends and phenomena in socio-scientific regional studies. Based on these insights, we present a catalogue of questions that should allow interested regional scientists to evaluate the applicability of online surveys when conceptualizing new research projects.

Keywords

  • Online survey
  • Sampling
  • Mobility studies
  • Regional studies

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Lebensmitteldiscounter und Supermarkt. Untersuchung zu Verkehrseffekten, Einzugsgebieten, Vorlieben der Kunden und zum Genehmigungsprozess vor dem Hintergrund der Regelungen des § 11 Abs. 3 BauNVO

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 219 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

For the location of new food markets in Germany, the provisions of article 11 sector 3 BauNVO (Federal Land Utilisation Ordinance) and the corresponding jurisdictions are of great importance. The expected impacts of new markets are always object of controversial discussions.

Against this backdrop, the study on qualified local supply, based on a nationwide household survey conducted by telephone, analyzed among others the catchment areas and traffic impacts of the different types of business in food retail — in correlation with the demands and preferences of customers. Unlike common surveys, related to a particular case and carried out within the course of urban land-use planning considerations, the presented study tries to provide general evidence. This shall provide the responsible public authorities and agencies of public interest with a reliable basis for necessary considerations and the balance of interests. Our empirical studies show that the in article 11 sector 3 BauNVO formulated general presumption of urban impacts from a sales area of 800 m2 onwards cannot be confirmed — at least not for the food retail sector. But there also is no other empirically robust sales area limit instead.

Besides the size of the market especially the location of the market (urban integrated vs. non-integrated), the urban framework (urban vs. rural) and the different retailers themselves (like Aldi, Edeka) have a crucial influence on traffic impacts and purchasing power levies.

Keywords

  • Local supply
  • Discounter
  • Supermarket
  • Article 11 sector 3 Federal Land Utilisation Ordinance
  • Catchment area
  • Impacts on traffic

Rezension

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

„Doing spatial research“

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 153 - 154

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

On the Evaluation of Knowledge Generation and Knowledge Transfer within the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) – Leibniz-Forum for Spatial Sciences

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 155 - 165

Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the conditions for transdisciplinary knowledge creation and transfer of knowledge in general using the Academy for Spatial Research and Planning (ARL) as an example. Based on a consideration of differences between practice-oriented and transdisciplinary research the paper discusses the role of science and practice and their relationship. It emphasises the need for a transdisciplinary dialogue including all relevant scientific disciplines and stakeholders for addressing major societal challenges. When scrutinizing the current evaluation practice of the Leibniz Association it can be shown that the tracing of impacts generated in discursive and applied research processes is a challenging task. Subsequently we discuss how the ARL—with its inherent tension between different scientific disciplines and the application-oriented planning practice—and other "non typical scientific institutes" can be evaluated. Based upon this, recommendations are given for further development of mechanisms to evaluate scientific institutions, in particular with regard to knowledge transfer and transdisciplinary research.

Keywords

  • Knowledge generation
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Transdisciplinarity
  • Evaluation
  • Spatial planning

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Polycentrism in Germany: A Comparative Study for Three City Regions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 167 - 183

Abstract

Abstract

The article takes up the current debate on polycentric urban areas as well as it visualizes the recent patterns of urban development by comparing the three city regions Cologne/Bonn, the eastern Ruhr area and Leipzig/Halle. For this purpose three maps showing the central functional cores, the separation of residential areas and commuting flows are presented and further explained. It shows that the spatial patterns of the three urban regions result from long-term development to which the traditional cores of settlements are still of high importance regarding the city regions. The dissolving of cities towards dispersed urban areas is only visible rudimentarily.

Keywords

  • Polycentric city region
  • Visualisation
  • Spatial development
  • Post-suburbanisation
  • Germany
  • Comparative urban research
access type Open Access

Medium-Sized Cities as Peripheral Centers: Cooperation, Competition and Hierarchy in Shrinking Regions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 185 - 202

Abstract

Abstract

Research and policy assume that inter-municipal cooperation is necessary to strengthen the role of medium-sized cities as regional centers in shrinking and peripheral regions and to ensure that services of general interest are maintained. Against this background, the article examines how medium-sized cities manage to position themselves in peripheral regions between the poles of re-centralization and peripheralisation. We discuss how inter-municipal cooperation, competition and hierarchies interact. Using the concept of Regional Governance as a framework for the analysis the questions are investigated empirically based on two case studies: firstly, using the example of the city triangle Altmark (Saxony-Anhalt), which is a polycentric network of cities, consisting of the city of Stendal and two neighbouring towns. Secondly, the location initiative Southwest-Pfalz (Rheinland-Pfalz) is scrutinized, an urban-rural cooperation between the city of Pirmasens and the district Southwest-Pfalz. The results indicate that both the pressure for cooperation and the need for competition are increasing for local actors. Finally we assume that inter-municipal cooperation only works under specific conditions and draw conclusions for regional planning, state and urban policy.

Keywords

  • Peripheralisation
  • Re-centralization
  • Medium-sized cities
  • Inter-municipal cooperation
  • Competition
  • Hierarchy
access type Open Access

Doing Online Surveys in Socio-scientific Regional Studies: Issues and Experiences

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 203 - 217

Abstract

Abstract

Empirical social research made use of online surveys since the mid-1990s. However, there is no significant methodological debate about this empirical tool in socio-scientific regional studies. In this paper, we delineate the online survey methodology, their advantages and disadvantages as well as potential contexts of application. Online surveys are useful especially for explorative and experimental quantitative research projects that deal with complex and new socio-spatial phenomena. Based on these observations, we will present practical experience with online survey research from three projects in the field of socio-scientific regional studies. We will focus on questionnaire design, sampling and technical solutions. The results show that particularly for studies on highly mobile social groups online surveys are an appropriate and powerful tool for data collection. Given that mobility and multilocality are more and more characterizing our societies and thus impact spatial structures, we argue that online surveys are underused as a method for the exploration of new trends and phenomena in socio-scientific regional studies. Based on these insights, we present a catalogue of questions that should allow interested regional scientists to evaluate the applicability of online surveys when conceptualizing new research projects.

Keywords

  • Online survey
  • Sampling
  • Mobility studies
  • Regional studies

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Lebensmitteldiscounter und Supermarkt. Untersuchung zu Verkehrseffekten, Einzugsgebieten, Vorlieben der Kunden und zum Genehmigungsprozess vor dem Hintergrund der Regelungen des § 11 Abs. 3 BauNVO

Published Online: 30 Jun 2015
Page range: 219 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

For the location of new food markets in Germany, the provisions of article 11 sector 3 BauNVO (Federal Land Utilisation Ordinance) and the corresponding jurisdictions are of great importance. The expected impacts of new markets are always object of controversial discussions.

Against this backdrop, the study on qualified local supply, based on a nationwide household survey conducted by telephone, analyzed among others the catchment areas and traffic impacts of the different types of business in food retail — in correlation with the demands and preferences of customers. Unlike common surveys, related to a particular case and carried out within the course of urban land-use planning considerations, the presented study tries to provide general evidence. This shall provide the responsible public authorities and agencies of public interest with a reliable basis for necessary considerations and the balance of interests. Our empirical studies show that the in article 11 sector 3 BauNVO formulated general presumption of urban impacts from a sales area of 800 m2 onwards cannot be confirmed — at least not for the food retail sector. But there also is no other empirically robust sales area limit instead.

Besides the size of the market especially the location of the market (urban integrated vs. non-integrated), the urban framework (urban vs. rural) and the different retailers themselves (like Aldi, Edeka) have a crucial influence on traffic impacts and purchasing power levies.

Keywords

  • Local supply
  • Discounter
  • Supermarket
  • Article 11 sector 3 Federal Land Utilisation Ordinance
  • Catchment area
  • Impacts on traffic

Rezension

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