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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Regionale StadtLandschaften

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 77 - 78

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Land Use Change caused by Demographic Change? Evidences and Conclusions

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 79 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Demographic change is often mentioned as one main driver for land use change. Since the 1970s, experts of spatial planning discuss consequences of demographic change. Currently, the topic is of importance in societal debates, too. However, does demographic change really directly influence land use change? As yet, comprehensive models of land use change are missing that describe the consequences of demographic change on land use in particular; mainly partial models exist up to now. Thus, this paper contributes to the questions if there is any empirical evidence for direct relations between demographic change and land use change and what consequences this has for spatial research and spatial development policies. For answering these questions, we conducted a comprehensive literature analysis for the period from 2005 to 2013 with regard to the German discourse and discussed the results at two expert workshops. The analysis shows a lack of references that provide evidence for a direct influence of demographic change on land use. This is in particular significant for the following types of land use: agriculture, forestry, tourism, and nature protection. Also indirect cause effect relations cannot be proved fully due to the lack of empiricism. Consequently, serious uncertainties exist regarding the effectiveness of spatial planning and spatial development approaches within this context.

Keywords

  • Demographic change
  • Land use
  • Land use change
  • Land management
access type Open Access

Regional Rurbanism: Patterns of Everyday Life Experiences of Post-Industrial Production of Space Between Homogenization and Fragmentation

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 91 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Customarily, cities are being described in terms of their historical origins and as manifestations of political conceptions, while rural areas are being characterized by natural spatial features and their contrast to cities. Due to its hybridity, "regional rurbanism" defies categorical consideration. It is more likely perceived as the result of the ambiguous interaction of social and natural, planned and unplanned, endogenous and exogenous forces. When it comes to living and working in these spatial contexts labels such as "rural" or "urban" have less and less value. What does the hybridization mean for everyday spatial experiences? Henri Lefebvre, whose spatial triad concepts are a starting point for the considerations at hand, discarded the urban-rural-differentiation on the grounds that it no longer corresponded to the social production of space under the terms of global urbanization processes and world-wide capitalism. And yet, along with tendencies toward homogenization, there are fragmentation processes at work, which accentuate spatial inequalities and received the attention in a two-dimensional treatment of spatial dynamics. The paper uses the above-mentioned, common characteristics of post-industrial spatial production as a starting point for the reconstruction of four spatial trends – homogenization, polarization, fragmentation and diversification. It is discussed how they may shape regionally varying spatial experiences of the life-world in order to better understand the constellation of conditions that apply to civic space appropriation beyond the classifications of planning. The study opens up novel perspectives for basic research in the fields of urban and regional planning that leave growth policy criteria behind.

Keywords

  • Social production of space
  • Spatial experience
  • Rurbanisation
  • Homogenization
  • Fragmentation
access type Open Access

The Concentration of Elderly Poverty in the Urban Landscape: Problems and Challenges

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 107 - 121

Abstract

Abstract

This article considers the consequences of two crucial and compounded societal trends: demographic aging and social polarization. The aim of the article is to connect the discussions that surround the spatial implications of demographic change with prevailing debates on social exclusion. Of particular concern is whether a spatial concentration of elderly poverty may be monitored at all and, in turn, whether the consequences of spatial concentration stand in direct correlation to the development of neighbourhoods or cities as a whole. Recent studies on the topic indicate that a concentration of people that are both elderly and poor can be predicted for specific urban areas. Since it is impossible to establish the appropriateness of the living environments of certain population groups as an objective fact (but only as the result of social construction processes) the judgement on these observations remains ambivalent. Although a number of negative consequences resulting from the spatial concentration of elderly poverty prove identifiable, there is little evidence of a direct connection between spatial concentration, perceptions of affected neighborhoods by local residents, and the quality of residents' living conditions. While the goal of social policy should remain the elimination of elderly poverty altogether, the existing opportunities that the urban areas in question offer its residents should neither be overlooked, nor underestimated.

Keywords

  • Urban development
  • Elderly poverty
  • Deprived neighborhoods
  • Social exclusion
  • Age-friendly neighbourhoods
  • Socio-spatial segregation

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Urban Development under Climate Change by Green Infrastructure

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 123 - 132

Abstract

Abstract

Urban vegetation and green spaces play a crucial role in dealing with the impacts of climate change: urban green spaces regulate the micro-climate in densely built-up and overheated settlement areas, and support the percolation of rain water and the retention of flood events. According to these findings, manifold measures of green space development are discussed, supporting an urban development which is appropriate to the challenges of climate change. Thus, retaining and enhancing the provision of settlement areas with green spaces in terms of green infrastructure is a central element of urban and regional climate adaptation strategies. In this paper the question is raised, how green infrastructure and its different potentials to adapt to climate change can be considered in the urban fabric and measures to enhance the green infrastructure can be implemented. As a part of the "Integrated Regional Climate Adaptation Programme for the Region of Dresden" a number of measures for the development and planning of green infrastructure have been developed. Based on these experiences, basic planning approaches to implement and realise green infrastructure, addressing climate adaptation both on city and site scale, are presented.

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation
  • Green space planning
  • Green spaces
  • Urban ecosystem services
access type Open Access

Public Participation for Communal Development in the Rural Area: Possible Combinations of Methods by the Example of Steinach, Kinzigtal

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 133 - 143

Abstract

Abstract

The federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg requires public participation for fundings on communal development. Various methods and instruments of public participation do exist now for years. Until 2014, the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg has funded wisdom councils (BürgerInnenRäte) to integrate the public who would normally not participate in any community work on local politics. Several thematic workshops were organized in Steinach, Kinzigtal in 2013 so as to create a development concept for the local community. Complementing the workshops a wisdom council was founded supporting an application for the Landessanierungsprogramm (programme to redevelop local communities). The results of the workshops were integrated into the development concept and were the basis for the process of the wisdom council. Without major changes, the proposed solution suggested by the wisdom council was converted into an application to the Landessanierungsprogramm. While demonstrating the innovative synergetic combination of methods of public participation, this essay additionally shows the advantages for communal planers in charge of engineering development concepts for rural communities which are affected by demographic and structural change.

Keywords

  • Wisdom council
  • Workshops
  • Communal development
  • Public participation
  • Rural area

Rezension

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Regionale StadtLandschaften

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 77 - 78

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Land Use Change caused by Demographic Change? Evidences and Conclusions

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 79 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Demographic change is often mentioned as one main driver for land use change. Since the 1970s, experts of spatial planning discuss consequences of demographic change. Currently, the topic is of importance in societal debates, too. However, does demographic change really directly influence land use change? As yet, comprehensive models of land use change are missing that describe the consequences of demographic change on land use in particular; mainly partial models exist up to now. Thus, this paper contributes to the questions if there is any empirical evidence for direct relations between demographic change and land use change and what consequences this has for spatial research and spatial development policies. For answering these questions, we conducted a comprehensive literature analysis for the period from 2005 to 2013 with regard to the German discourse and discussed the results at two expert workshops. The analysis shows a lack of references that provide evidence for a direct influence of demographic change on land use. This is in particular significant for the following types of land use: agriculture, forestry, tourism, and nature protection. Also indirect cause effect relations cannot be proved fully due to the lack of empiricism. Consequently, serious uncertainties exist regarding the effectiveness of spatial planning and spatial development approaches within this context.

Keywords

  • Demographic change
  • Land use
  • Land use change
  • Land management
access type Open Access

Regional Rurbanism: Patterns of Everyday Life Experiences of Post-Industrial Production of Space Between Homogenization and Fragmentation

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 91 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Customarily, cities are being described in terms of their historical origins and as manifestations of political conceptions, while rural areas are being characterized by natural spatial features and their contrast to cities. Due to its hybridity, "regional rurbanism" defies categorical consideration. It is more likely perceived as the result of the ambiguous interaction of social and natural, planned and unplanned, endogenous and exogenous forces. When it comes to living and working in these spatial contexts labels such as "rural" or "urban" have less and less value. What does the hybridization mean for everyday spatial experiences? Henri Lefebvre, whose spatial triad concepts are a starting point for the considerations at hand, discarded the urban-rural-differentiation on the grounds that it no longer corresponded to the social production of space under the terms of global urbanization processes and world-wide capitalism. And yet, along with tendencies toward homogenization, there are fragmentation processes at work, which accentuate spatial inequalities and received the attention in a two-dimensional treatment of spatial dynamics. The paper uses the above-mentioned, common characteristics of post-industrial spatial production as a starting point for the reconstruction of four spatial trends – homogenization, polarization, fragmentation and diversification. It is discussed how they may shape regionally varying spatial experiences of the life-world in order to better understand the constellation of conditions that apply to civic space appropriation beyond the classifications of planning. The study opens up novel perspectives for basic research in the fields of urban and regional planning that leave growth policy criteria behind.

Keywords

  • Social production of space
  • Spatial experience
  • Rurbanisation
  • Homogenization
  • Fragmentation
access type Open Access

The Concentration of Elderly Poverty in the Urban Landscape: Problems and Challenges

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 107 - 121

Abstract

Abstract

This article considers the consequences of two crucial and compounded societal trends: demographic aging and social polarization. The aim of the article is to connect the discussions that surround the spatial implications of demographic change with prevailing debates on social exclusion. Of particular concern is whether a spatial concentration of elderly poverty may be monitored at all and, in turn, whether the consequences of spatial concentration stand in direct correlation to the development of neighbourhoods or cities as a whole. Recent studies on the topic indicate that a concentration of people that are both elderly and poor can be predicted for specific urban areas. Since it is impossible to establish the appropriateness of the living environments of certain population groups as an objective fact (but only as the result of social construction processes) the judgement on these observations remains ambivalent. Although a number of negative consequences resulting from the spatial concentration of elderly poverty prove identifiable, there is little evidence of a direct connection between spatial concentration, perceptions of affected neighborhoods by local residents, and the quality of residents' living conditions. While the goal of social policy should remain the elimination of elderly poverty altogether, the existing opportunities that the urban areas in question offer its residents should neither be overlooked, nor underestimated.

Keywords

  • Urban development
  • Elderly poverty
  • Deprived neighborhoods
  • Social exclusion
  • Age-friendly neighbourhoods
  • Socio-spatial segregation

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Urban Development under Climate Change by Green Infrastructure

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 123 - 132

Abstract

Abstract

Urban vegetation and green spaces play a crucial role in dealing with the impacts of climate change: urban green spaces regulate the micro-climate in densely built-up and overheated settlement areas, and support the percolation of rain water and the retention of flood events. According to these findings, manifold measures of green space development are discussed, supporting an urban development which is appropriate to the challenges of climate change. Thus, retaining and enhancing the provision of settlement areas with green spaces in terms of green infrastructure is a central element of urban and regional climate adaptation strategies. In this paper the question is raised, how green infrastructure and its different potentials to adapt to climate change can be considered in the urban fabric and measures to enhance the green infrastructure can be implemented. As a part of the "Integrated Regional Climate Adaptation Programme for the Region of Dresden" a number of measures for the development and planning of green infrastructure have been developed. Based on these experiences, basic planning approaches to implement and realise green infrastructure, addressing climate adaptation both on city and site scale, are presented.

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation
  • Green space planning
  • Green spaces
  • Urban ecosystem services
access type Open Access

Public Participation for Communal Development in the Rural Area: Possible Combinations of Methods by the Example of Steinach, Kinzigtal

Published Online: 30 Apr 2015
Page range: 133 - 143

Abstract

Abstract

The federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg requires public participation for fundings on communal development. Various methods and instruments of public participation do exist now for years. Until 2014, the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg has funded wisdom councils (BürgerInnenRäte) to integrate the public who would normally not participate in any community work on local politics. Several thematic workshops were organized in Steinach, Kinzigtal in 2013 so as to create a development concept for the local community. Complementing the workshops a wisdom council was founded supporting an application for the Landessanierungsprogramm (programme to redevelop local communities). The results of the workshops were integrated into the development concept and were the basis for the process of the wisdom council. Without major changes, the proposed solution suggested by the wisdom council was converted into an application to the Landessanierungsprogramm. While demonstrating the innovative synergetic combination of methods of public participation, this essay additionally shows the advantages for communal planers in charge of engineering development concepts for rural communities which are affected by demographic and structural change.

Keywords

  • Wisdom council
  • Workshops
  • Communal development
  • Public participation
  • Rural area

Rezension

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