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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

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Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Citizens Wanted. Changing Roles in the Provision of Public Services in Rural Areas

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 5 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

Since the mid-20th century, state interventions and investments have helped rural areas undergo a strong process of modernization ("urbanization"). Due to this development, the provision of public services is still widely considered to be a top-down process today. Yet this perception was never entirely true (when considering, for example, voluntary fire brigades). Moreover, in the course of loss-making and highly indebted municipal budgets and socio-demographic changes, the division of work between the different actors—whether suppliers, customers or facilitators in this process—is blurred. At the same time, the tasks and quality of service provision are constantly transforming. This paper argues, firstly, that the provision of public services implies a transfer of responsibilities to highly different actors, thus leading to confusion and a lack of public knowledge concerning exact responsibilities. Secondly, in this new constellation of actors, also citizens are held responsible. This "responsibilization" ties in with existing roles and is, to a certain degree, accepted by rural populations. Yet, this new complexity also leads to increasing challenges with regard to the steering and facilitating roles of public administrations. The empirical part of the paper deals with three distinct public services: public schools, broadband internet and voluntary fire brigades. The analysis shows that in these fields self-responsibilization plays a crucial role—yet, not to replace the state as an actor but to adapt public services to new standards or avoid a further degradation of these services.

Keywords

  • Public services
  • Actors
  • Rural areas
  • Responsibilization
Open Access

Subjectivity and Causality in (the Study of) Migration: Approaches to Rationalizations of Migration-Related Decisions in Shrinking Regions

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 17 - 30

Abstract

Abstract

Based on qualitative research on livescapes in peripheralized regions, claims have surfaced within the recently rejuvenated debate on peripheralization to not only focus on socio-structural aspects of spatial disparities, but also to consider the effects of discursive ascriptions. Using early findings from the research project "Discourse and practices in shrinking regions. An analysis of the subjective relevance of shrinkage discourses using the example of the municipality of Altenburger Land", we demonstrate how different professionals conceptualize alleged causal relations between financial subsidies for "culture" or "infrastructure" and migration-related decisions. Furthermore, we illuminate their rationalizations of these decisions and take also the subjective aspects of migrations that may contradict their views into consideration. We conclude our chapter with a summary of the important uncertainties in the research of migration as well as regarding the political practice of dealing with migration-related decisions.

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Infrastructure
  • Subject
  • Shrinkages
  • Peripheralization
  • Altenburg
Open Access

What is so Decentralised About the Energy Transition? Addressing Renewable Energy Infrastructures as Challenges and Opportunities for Rural Areas

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 31 - 43

Abstract

Abstract

Decentralisation is an important catchword of the German Energiewende (energy transition), due to the fact that the renewable energy sources (e.g. solar radiation and wind) are generally found everywhere. Consequently, novel socio-technical systems have become apparent, especially in rural areas. The article describes the institutional changes which have occurred in the large technical system of energy supply as a result of the Energiewende in rural areas and identifies the scalar opportunities for action presented by the infrastructures of renewable energies. In a first step, new energy infrastructures in rural areas are discussed, with particular concern for their role in the ongoing tension between centralised and decentralised solutions. As rural renewable energies are not only a part of regional public services, the decentralised infrastructural system is per se not equivalent to a decentralisation of benefits. The provision of areas for photovoltaic, biomass or wind power systems results in a landscape change closely linked to conflicts. Rural areas can be characterised as "installation sites", developed on the basis of investment and planning decisions made outside of the respective regions. From this discussion, the second step consists in analysing the opportunities for action on the regional scale and the public interest objectives of stakeholders in creating perspectives for collective action. Accordingly, the engagement of communal and regional stakeholders, in the form of social and economic participation, is deemed necessary to achieve public interest objectives. By connecting collective actors in collaborative networks and regional action arenas, a new scale of renewable energy supply can be established.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Infrastructure
  • Decentralised systems
  • Rural areas
  • Rescaling
  • Regional action arenas
Open Access

Regulating or funding? Activities for maintaining the provision with basic commodities in rural areas of Germany compared to South Tyrol

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 45 - 58

Abstract

Abstract

Shops for basic commodities such as food, beverages, and drugstore products have been closing in rural areas in many countries. Looking to other European countries helps to realize the specific attempts made for maintaining local supply and enables mutual learning. This paper compares Germany with South Tyrol using statistical data, expert interviews, literature review as well as documentary analysis. The system for the provision of basic commodities differs remarkably between Germany and South Tyrol. Large supermarkets and food discounters have superseded small scale shops in Germany. In South Tyrol, traditional retail structures have however sustained an area wide presence with small, locally owned stores. The paper investigates the reasons for this distinction. Strong spatial planning regulations turned out to be very effective in South Tyrol in order to maintain facilities within walking distance. By contrast, the German approach, which tries to subsidize mainly new shops with huge amounts of money, could not stop the thinning out of stores in rural areas. In fact, both strategies have specific advantages and disadvantages. Thus, both countries can learn from each other.

Keywords

  • Basic commodities provision
  • Village shop
  • Retail regulation
  • Rural development
  • Services of general interest

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

Rural Social Infrastructure Breaking New Ground: The Project “Assisted living on farms” as a Perspective for the Strudengau Region in Upper Austria

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 59 - 71

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with a “care farming” project, based on investigations of seven different farms in Perg, Upper Austria. Between 1996 and 1999, an innovative approach to care possibilities of older people in rural areas was developed and implemented by different actors (chamber of agriculture, welfare association, farmers), financially supported by the European Union. European subsidies allowed for education in elderly care and the development of barrier-free residential units for elderly people in existing farm buildings. An analysis ten years after the implementation of the project examines whether assisted living on farms constitutes a promising perspective for social infrastructure planning in the region and derives strategies and principles from the existing examples, which serve as models for high quality aging and care on farms.

Keywords

  • Care farming
  • Upper Austria
  • Demographic change
  • Agricultural diversification
  • Region of Strudengau

Rezension

Open Access

wagner, Thomas (2013): Die Mitmachfalle. Bürgerbeteiligung als Herrschaftsinstrument

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 73 - 74

Abstract

Danksagung

Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2014

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 75 - 76

Abstract

8 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Citizens Wanted. Changing Roles in the Provision of Public Services in Rural Areas

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 5 - 16

Abstract

Abstract

Since the mid-20th century, state interventions and investments have helped rural areas undergo a strong process of modernization ("urbanization"). Due to this development, the provision of public services is still widely considered to be a top-down process today. Yet this perception was never entirely true (when considering, for example, voluntary fire brigades). Moreover, in the course of loss-making and highly indebted municipal budgets and socio-demographic changes, the division of work between the different actors—whether suppliers, customers or facilitators in this process—is blurred. At the same time, the tasks and quality of service provision are constantly transforming. This paper argues, firstly, that the provision of public services implies a transfer of responsibilities to highly different actors, thus leading to confusion and a lack of public knowledge concerning exact responsibilities. Secondly, in this new constellation of actors, also citizens are held responsible. This "responsibilization" ties in with existing roles and is, to a certain degree, accepted by rural populations. Yet, this new complexity also leads to increasing challenges with regard to the steering and facilitating roles of public administrations. The empirical part of the paper deals with three distinct public services: public schools, broadband internet and voluntary fire brigades. The analysis shows that in these fields self-responsibilization plays a crucial role—yet, not to replace the state as an actor but to adapt public services to new standards or avoid a further degradation of these services.

Keywords

  • Public services
  • Actors
  • Rural areas
  • Responsibilization
Open Access

Subjectivity and Causality in (the Study of) Migration: Approaches to Rationalizations of Migration-Related Decisions in Shrinking Regions

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 17 - 30

Abstract

Abstract

Based on qualitative research on livescapes in peripheralized regions, claims have surfaced within the recently rejuvenated debate on peripheralization to not only focus on socio-structural aspects of spatial disparities, but also to consider the effects of discursive ascriptions. Using early findings from the research project "Discourse and practices in shrinking regions. An analysis of the subjective relevance of shrinkage discourses using the example of the municipality of Altenburger Land", we demonstrate how different professionals conceptualize alleged causal relations between financial subsidies for "culture" or "infrastructure" and migration-related decisions. Furthermore, we illuminate their rationalizations of these decisions and take also the subjective aspects of migrations that may contradict their views into consideration. We conclude our chapter with a summary of the important uncertainties in the research of migration as well as regarding the political practice of dealing with migration-related decisions.

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Infrastructure
  • Subject
  • Shrinkages
  • Peripheralization
  • Altenburg
Open Access

What is so Decentralised About the Energy Transition? Addressing Renewable Energy Infrastructures as Challenges and Opportunities for Rural Areas

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 31 - 43

Abstract

Abstract

Decentralisation is an important catchword of the German Energiewende (energy transition), due to the fact that the renewable energy sources (e.g. solar radiation and wind) are generally found everywhere. Consequently, novel socio-technical systems have become apparent, especially in rural areas. The article describes the institutional changes which have occurred in the large technical system of energy supply as a result of the Energiewende in rural areas and identifies the scalar opportunities for action presented by the infrastructures of renewable energies. In a first step, new energy infrastructures in rural areas are discussed, with particular concern for their role in the ongoing tension between centralised and decentralised solutions. As rural renewable energies are not only a part of regional public services, the decentralised infrastructural system is per se not equivalent to a decentralisation of benefits. The provision of areas for photovoltaic, biomass or wind power systems results in a landscape change closely linked to conflicts. Rural areas can be characterised as "installation sites", developed on the basis of investment and planning decisions made outside of the respective regions. From this discussion, the second step consists in analysing the opportunities for action on the regional scale and the public interest objectives of stakeholders in creating perspectives for collective action. Accordingly, the engagement of communal and regional stakeholders, in the form of social and economic participation, is deemed necessary to achieve public interest objectives. By connecting collective actors in collaborative networks and regional action arenas, a new scale of renewable energy supply can be established.

Keywords

  • Renewable energies
  • Infrastructure
  • Decentralised systems
  • Rural areas
  • Rescaling
  • Regional action arenas
Open Access

Regulating or funding? Activities for maintaining the provision with basic commodities in rural areas of Germany compared to South Tyrol

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 45 - 58

Abstract

Abstract

Shops for basic commodities such as food, beverages, and drugstore products have been closing in rural areas in many countries. Looking to other European countries helps to realize the specific attempts made for maintaining local supply and enables mutual learning. This paper compares Germany with South Tyrol using statistical data, expert interviews, literature review as well as documentary analysis. The system for the provision of basic commodities differs remarkably between Germany and South Tyrol. Large supermarkets and food discounters have superseded small scale shops in Germany. In South Tyrol, traditional retail structures have however sustained an area wide presence with small, locally owned stores. The paper investigates the reasons for this distinction. Strong spatial planning regulations turned out to be very effective in South Tyrol in order to maintain facilities within walking distance. By contrast, the German approach, which tries to subsidize mainly new shops with huge amounts of money, could not stop the thinning out of stores in rural areas. In fact, both strategies have specific advantages and disadvantages. Thus, both countries can learn from each other.

Keywords

  • Basic commodities provision
  • Village shop
  • Retail regulation
  • Rural development
  • Services of general interest

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

Rural Social Infrastructure Breaking New Ground: The Project “Assisted living on farms” as a Perspective for the Strudengau Region in Upper Austria

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 59 - 71

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with a “care farming” project, based on investigations of seven different farms in Perg, Upper Austria. Between 1996 and 1999, an innovative approach to care possibilities of older people in rural areas was developed and implemented by different actors (chamber of agriculture, welfare association, farmers), financially supported by the European Union. European subsidies allowed for education in elderly care and the development of barrier-free residential units for elderly people in existing farm buildings. An analysis ten years after the implementation of the project examines whether assisted living on farms constitutes a promising perspective for social infrastructure planning in the region and derives strategies and principles from the existing examples, which serve as models for high quality aging and care on farms.

Keywords

  • Care farming
  • Upper Austria
  • Demographic change
  • Agricultural diversification
  • Region of Strudengau

Rezension

Open Access

wagner, Thomas (2013): Die Mitmachfalle. Bürgerbeteiligung als Herrschaftsinstrument

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 73 - 74

Abstract

Danksagung

Open Access

Danksagung an die Reviewer im Jahr 2014

Published Online: 28 Feb 2015
Page range: 75 - 76

Abstract

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