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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial: Im besten Sinne bodenständig

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 449 - 450

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

Coordination and Leadership in Spatial Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 451 - 462

Abstract

Abstract

The article intends to link up the discussion on coordination in spatial planning to the on-going discussions on governance and leadership. Coordination has traits of a collective good which provides benefits at large but shifts the burden on individual actors. Leadership in organizations has to master similar difficulties but succeeds by developing among the stake-holders a common mindset of being in the same boat and profiting individually of a successful leadership. But in contrast to leaders in organizations, planners have first to establish the necessary governance arrangements in order to mould stakeholders into a coordinating community interested in collectively fostering the development of the region. Also the tasks of leadership are more difficult because planners do not dispose of the power resources of an organizational leadership. The aim of this paper is to explain why planners could mobilize their poor power resources more effectively.

Keywords

  • Coordination
  • Leadership
  • Governance
  • Power
  • Institutional constraints
  • Steering

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Significance of Endogenous Potentials in Regions Characterized by Small and Medium Sized Towns: Considerations Against the Background of the Territorial Agenda 2020

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 463 - 475

Abstract

Abstract

Small and medium-sized towns are often the losers in times of economic crisis, as their internal innovation and growth potentials are low. Such places are especially reliant on external investment and public funding, a fact which aggravates the economic, social and demographic repercussions of the current crisis. Against this background this paper discusses the role that endogenous growth potentials—also highlighted in the EU’s Territorial Agenda 2020—might play in stabilizing such regions. The argument rests on two case-studies in old industrial regions, where the strategic utilization of such potentials by local actors is analysed and their overall influence on regional development discussed. By linking these examples to discussions from the 1980s and 1990s on endogenous potentials, the paper points out that today the primary consideration is not the direct economic impact of potentials. Instead the focus is on the role of endogenous potentials in triggering regional development processes (catalyzing function), highlighting regional uniqueness (identification function) and strengthening regional self-confidence (symbolic function).

Keywords

  • Regional development
  • Endogenous potentials
  • Small and medium-sized towns
  • Territorial Agenda 2020
  • Structural change
access type Open Access

Alternative Cultural Institutions in Germany: Questioning Economic Perspectives on Spaces of Creativity

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 477 - 489

Abstract

Abstract

In 2007 the German Bundestag issued an extensive parliamentary report on “Culture in Germany” that spurred broad debates about the role of cultural institutions in urban and regional planning. Subsequently, these infrastructures gained particular importance in discussions on the cultural and creative industries as nodes for professional activities and marketplaces for cultural goods. By analyzing the material and discursive trajectories of alternative cultural and community centres in Germany the paper argues that economic perspectives on spaces of creativity obscure important dimensions of creative practices. Firstly, conceptions of creativity as a defining feature of occupations and economic sectors imply that creative pursuits are ultimately determined by patterns of supply and demand. Mundane activities on a day-to-day basis however show that alternative creativities are frequently driven by voluntary engagements, personal desires and affection towards people and ideas. Secondly, as studies on the creative industries offer rather current diagnoses of cultural infrastructures the historical dimension of political discussions is often missing from theses analyses. Established since the 1960s, alternative cultural institutions are conceptualized as sustainable meeting places that offer spaces for communication, self-determination and free play. Finally, creative industry thinking emphasizes specific geographical contexts for creative production. The overriding observation is one of urban agglomeration and spatial clustering. The mapping of alternative cultural infrastructures reveals a more complex and nuanced geography of non-profit creativity that encompasses material spaces in suburban and more rural areas. Cultural and community centres offer an important and sometimes occasional anchor point for creativity in these peripheries lacking publicly funded and privately financed cultural infrastructures.

Keywords

  • Cultural infrastructure
  • Creativity
  • Cultural policy
  • Alternative culture
  • Cultural centre
  • Germany
access type Open Access

Geo-information in waste disposal planning and strategic spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 491 - 501

Abstract

Abstract

The declining growth and the resulting “perforation” of settlements cause high charges for infrastructure use and decreasing municipal tax revenue, which may be regarded as a “second rent”. Besides, property values decrease due to vacancy rate, the decay of rural settlements could be initiated. In order to both keep the costs for waste disposal constant as well as to develop a sustainable, compact settlement structure despite of shrinkage, synergies of overall and sectoral spatial planning should be improved. This paper points out a potential strategy to reduce expenses for the cost driver “collection of residual waste” as well as to use the waste disposal as a management tool of the settlement development. Throughout the entire process—from local migration analyses to vacancy rate and possibilities of inner urban development to waste disposal management—geo- and attribute-data were used, provided by different institutions. The data were managed, analysed and visualised by an open source geo-information and geo-database-software. Thus, the information of sectoral and overall spatial planning was overlaid and in result a sustainable, resource-efficient strategic planning is improved using a geo-information tool. Consequently, a centralisation of waste disposal could be improved by a GIS-assisted analysis of location and accessibility of central garbage containers. This centralisation is expected to allow a resource-efficient urban planning.

Keywords

  • Geo-information in planning process
  • Waste disposal management
  • Synergies of spatial sectoral and overall planning
  • Rural areas
  • Declining growth
access type Open Access

Influences of a Migration Background on Daily Urban Mobility

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 503 - 516

Abstract

Abstract

Germany is facing substantial demographic changes. Beside ageing and shrinking there is a growing ethnic diversity due to past and ongoing migration. Migrants and their offspring (people with a migration background) account for a noticeable and growing share of the population. Despite these developments, only very few German transport studies focussed so far on migrants and their mobility behaviour. Therefore, this study examines the mobility behaviour of people with and without a migration background in Offenbach am Main. The results show differences for various mobility indicators such as driving licence, numbers of cars and bicycles per household, cycling ability and the use of different transport modes. Additional multivariate analyses show the main influencing factors for transport mode use. Thus, the study extends the spare empirical knowledge of migrants and their daily urban mobility in Germany.

Keywords

  • Everyday mobility
  • Migrants
  • Mobility behaviour
  • Empirical research
  • Survey
  • Transport planning

Rezension

access type Open Access

Kosten und Nutzen des Nationalparks Bayerischer Wald. Eine ökonomische Bewertung unter Berücksichtigung von Tourismus und Forstwirtschaft

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 517 - 519

Abstract

access type Open Access

Das deutsche Vermessungs- und Geoinformationswesen 2014

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 521 - 523

Abstract

8 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Editorial: Im besten Sinne bodenständig

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 449 - 450

Abstract

Zur Diskussion

access type Open Access

Coordination and Leadership in Spatial Planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 451 - 462

Abstract

Abstract

The article intends to link up the discussion on coordination in spatial planning to the on-going discussions on governance and leadership. Coordination has traits of a collective good which provides benefits at large but shifts the burden on individual actors. Leadership in organizations has to master similar difficulties but succeeds by developing among the stake-holders a common mindset of being in the same boat and profiting individually of a successful leadership. But in contrast to leaders in organizations, planners have first to establish the necessary governance arrangements in order to mould stakeholders into a coordinating community interested in collectively fostering the development of the region. Also the tasks of leadership are more difficult because planners do not dispose of the power resources of an organizational leadership. The aim of this paper is to explain why planners could mobilize their poor power resources more effectively.

Keywords

  • Coordination
  • Leadership
  • Governance
  • Power
  • Institutional constraints
  • Steering

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Significance of Endogenous Potentials in Regions Characterized by Small and Medium Sized Towns: Considerations Against the Background of the Territorial Agenda 2020

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 463 - 475

Abstract

Abstract

Small and medium-sized towns are often the losers in times of economic crisis, as their internal innovation and growth potentials are low. Such places are especially reliant on external investment and public funding, a fact which aggravates the economic, social and demographic repercussions of the current crisis. Against this background this paper discusses the role that endogenous growth potentials—also highlighted in the EU’s Territorial Agenda 2020—might play in stabilizing such regions. The argument rests on two case-studies in old industrial regions, where the strategic utilization of such potentials by local actors is analysed and their overall influence on regional development discussed. By linking these examples to discussions from the 1980s and 1990s on endogenous potentials, the paper points out that today the primary consideration is not the direct economic impact of potentials. Instead the focus is on the role of endogenous potentials in triggering regional development processes (catalyzing function), highlighting regional uniqueness (identification function) and strengthening regional self-confidence (symbolic function).

Keywords

  • Regional development
  • Endogenous potentials
  • Small and medium-sized towns
  • Territorial Agenda 2020
  • Structural change
access type Open Access

Alternative Cultural Institutions in Germany: Questioning Economic Perspectives on Spaces of Creativity

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 477 - 489

Abstract

Abstract

In 2007 the German Bundestag issued an extensive parliamentary report on “Culture in Germany” that spurred broad debates about the role of cultural institutions in urban and regional planning. Subsequently, these infrastructures gained particular importance in discussions on the cultural and creative industries as nodes for professional activities and marketplaces for cultural goods. By analyzing the material and discursive trajectories of alternative cultural and community centres in Germany the paper argues that economic perspectives on spaces of creativity obscure important dimensions of creative practices. Firstly, conceptions of creativity as a defining feature of occupations and economic sectors imply that creative pursuits are ultimately determined by patterns of supply and demand. Mundane activities on a day-to-day basis however show that alternative creativities are frequently driven by voluntary engagements, personal desires and affection towards people and ideas. Secondly, as studies on the creative industries offer rather current diagnoses of cultural infrastructures the historical dimension of political discussions is often missing from theses analyses. Established since the 1960s, alternative cultural institutions are conceptualized as sustainable meeting places that offer spaces for communication, self-determination and free play. Finally, creative industry thinking emphasizes specific geographical contexts for creative production. The overriding observation is one of urban agglomeration and spatial clustering. The mapping of alternative cultural infrastructures reveals a more complex and nuanced geography of non-profit creativity that encompasses material spaces in suburban and more rural areas. Cultural and community centres offer an important and sometimes occasional anchor point for creativity in these peripheries lacking publicly funded and privately financed cultural infrastructures.

Keywords

  • Cultural infrastructure
  • Creativity
  • Cultural policy
  • Alternative culture
  • Cultural centre
  • Germany
access type Open Access

Geo-information in waste disposal planning and strategic spatial planning

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 491 - 501

Abstract

Abstract

The declining growth and the resulting “perforation” of settlements cause high charges for infrastructure use and decreasing municipal tax revenue, which may be regarded as a “second rent”. Besides, property values decrease due to vacancy rate, the decay of rural settlements could be initiated. In order to both keep the costs for waste disposal constant as well as to develop a sustainable, compact settlement structure despite of shrinkage, synergies of overall and sectoral spatial planning should be improved. This paper points out a potential strategy to reduce expenses for the cost driver “collection of residual waste” as well as to use the waste disposal as a management tool of the settlement development. Throughout the entire process—from local migration analyses to vacancy rate and possibilities of inner urban development to waste disposal management—geo- and attribute-data were used, provided by different institutions. The data were managed, analysed and visualised by an open source geo-information and geo-database-software. Thus, the information of sectoral and overall spatial planning was overlaid and in result a sustainable, resource-efficient strategic planning is improved using a geo-information tool. Consequently, a centralisation of waste disposal could be improved by a GIS-assisted analysis of location and accessibility of central garbage containers. This centralisation is expected to allow a resource-efficient urban planning.

Keywords

  • Geo-information in planning process
  • Waste disposal management
  • Synergies of spatial sectoral and overall planning
  • Rural areas
  • Declining growth
access type Open Access

Influences of a Migration Background on Daily Urban Mobility

Published Online: 31 Dec 2014
Page range: 503 - 516

Abstract

Abstract

Germany is facing substantial demographic changes. Beside ageing and shrinking there is a growing ethnic diversity due to past and ongoing migration. Migrants and their offspring (people with a migration background) account for a noticeable and growing share of the population. Despite these developments, only very few German transport studies focussed so far on migrants and their mobility behaviour. Therefore, this study examines the mobility behaviour of people with and without a migration background in Offenbach am Main. The results show differences for various mobility indicators such as driving licence, numbers of cars and bicycles per household, cycling ability and the use of different transport modes. Additional multivariate analyses show the main influencing factors for transport mode use. Thus, the study extends the spare empirical knowledge of migrants and their daily urban mobility in Germany.

Keywords

  • Everyday mobility
  • Migrants
  • Mobility behaviour
  • Empirical research
  • Survey
  • Transport planning

Rezension

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