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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Von Hockeroda nach New Orleans ...

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 369 - 370

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

“Oh, I go on a whim.” Mobility in the everyday lives of the elderly living in the countryside

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 371 - 384

Abstract

Abstract

Since the problematisation of the demographic change, mobility research has taken a stronger interest in the mobility of the elderly. It’s here that the research is often influenced by the needs of transportation planning and policy. This often results in framing the mobility of elderly people as a technical or organisational problem. However, if mobility viewed as a social phenomenon, the question must be asked: How are mobility und the routines of daily life intertwined? The paper approaches the everyday mobility of the elderly from an agent-centred perspective. To provide an understanding of how the elderly living in rural areas view mobility and integrate it into their daily lives is the main aim of the paper. Using the results of a qualitative study, this paper emphasises causes leading to travel decisions and illustrates the importance of emotions and the functional aspect of maintaining health. Most importantly, this paper will show the value of social contacts. Even if everyday needs, such as grocery shopping or a trip to the doctor, prove to be the reason for ity, occurrences of social interaction are which count and which influence the lives of elderly people living in the countryside. Finally, based on the findings, the implications for transportation planning and policy will be outlined and explored.

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • The elderly
  • Rural areas
  • Countryside
  • Everyday life
  • Routines
  • Qualitative study
access type Open Access

Rooms Available? The Rediscovery of the Relevance of Student Housing for Local Housing Markets

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 385 - 399

Abstract

Abstract

Due to the rising number of students and an increasing shortage in housing in many university cities, debates about student housing are starting to gain more attention from politics, the media, the housing industry and science. As a result, the state of knowledge about the structure and development of the local housing market and its impact is rather limited in both theory and practice. Reliable and comprehensive information about the housing market and its evolution are essential for socio-political and housing-related decisions. This paper aims at filling this research gap. After describing factors related to the rising demand in student housing, case studies focusing on student housing and its political significance are presented. Furthermore, this study characterises the development and structure of supply as well as the demand for student housing, and how these factors interrelate with the local housing market. In light of the current discussion about the housing shortages, the consequences of the rental market conditions for students are highlighted. Finally, this paper concludes by providing possible approaches to ensure market transparency

Keywords

  • Student housing
  • University cities
  • Housing market
  • Interlinking effects
  • Renter’s market
  • Landlord’s market
  • Studentification
access type Open Access

Collaborative Consumption, Social Capital and the Neighbourhood. An Approximation

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 401 - 413

Abstract

Abstract

Both, neighbourhoods and Collaborative Consumption (sometimes also referred to as Sharing Economy or New Economy), are the loci of interest in current scientific and political discussions that oscillate between the global and the local. This article aims to link the concepts’ potential procedural similarities more closely than has been done so far. Both of these concepts consider societal problems and potentials to be affecting the micro level; they form a part of the currently undergoing local shift. In order to explore this potential in more detail, we will present a typology of different platforms of Collaborative Consumption that takes into consideration both, social capital and relevant characteristics of a neighbourhood. Based on this analysis, we will argue that many of these platforms, despite their emphasis on neighbourly relationships, don’t necessarily foster an accumulation of social capital within neighbourhoods. However, there is one distinguished type, we define it as “the autotelic-oriented one”, which can potentially have a positive impact on neighbourhood development. Only this type enables the accumulation of social capital, attempts to overcome socio-economic barriers and provides reciprocity mechanisms for the exchange of favours. This type could be fruitful for neighbourhoods and should be taken into account more seriously by researchers and professionals in this field. We will argue that Collaborative Consumption can hence result in a “neighbourhood 2.0” – a community that is complementarity strengthened through web-based services.

Keywords

  • Collaborative consumption
  • Neighbourhoods
  • Social capital
  • Local shift
access type Open Access

Subsidies for Regional Networks: Measurable Effects for Regional Development?

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 415 - 426

Abstract

Abstract

The change of paradigm of the policy for rural regions towards cooperative and actor-orientated regional development nowadays is hardly doubted. Nevertheless there are few findings on the effectivity of these subsidiaries. Presented in this article is the result of a nation-wide regional statistical analysis to the correlation of the support-programmes for cooperative regional development on one hand and established regional development indicators und the other hand. The distinctive feature to other analyses is the simultaneous analysis of several programmes supported by several political departements over a longer period. The result is obvious: in fact, effects for the regional development are not commensurable. This remarkable finding should give impulses for the enhancements of the instruments of rural development.

Keywords

  • Regional development
  • Support programmes
  • Regional networks
  • Effects
  • Efficiency
access type Open Access

Asymmetrical Recovery in Cities After Disaster. The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 427 - 439

Abstract

Abstract

When flood events trigger disaster in cities, the recovery process constitutes a complex field of activity covering urban space, state institutions, and impacted citizens. Recovery may not occur evenly, but instead, asymmetrically. In the case of the city of New Orleans in the USA, heavily hit by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, this can be observed particularly in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward. Here, a rebuilding program oriented towards homeowners was supposed to enable citizens to return. Why couldn’t the plans and programs for recovery prevent the emergence of asymmetric recovery in the Lower Ninth Ward? This paper shows that these plans and programs didn’t adequately respond to urban spatial and social conditions and weren’t oriented towards the vulnerability of impacted citizens. For this purpose, empirical data collected via quantitative and qualitative methods in 2007 and 2009 are featured here. The aim is to support knowledge-based planning recommendations that address the vulnerability of impacted citizens and to contribute to a discussion on just and sustainable recovery in and of cities after disaster.

Keywords

  • Disaster recovery
  • Floods
  • Disaster
  • Vulnerability
  • Urban planning

Rezension

access type Open Access

Wie werden Landschaften gemacht? Sozialwissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf die Konstituierung von Kulturlandschaften

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 441 - 443

Abstract

access type Open Access

Tourismus und Regionalentwicklung in Bayern

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 445 - 446

Abstract

access type Open Access

Wirtschaftliche Effekte des Tourismus in Biosphärenreservaten Deutschlands

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 447 - 448

Abstract

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Von Hockeroda nach New Orleans ...

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 369 - 370

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

“Oh, I go on a whim.” Mobility in the everyday lives of the elderly living in the countryside

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 371 - 384

Abstract

Abstract

Since the problematisation of the demographic change, mobility research has taken a stronger interest in the mobility of the elderly. It’s here that the research is often influenced by the needs of transportation planning and policy. This often results in framing the mobility of elderly people as a technical or organisational problem. However, if mobility viewed as a social phenomenon, the question must be asked: How are mobility und the routines of daily life intertwined? The paper approaches the everyday mobility of the elderly from an agent-centred perspective. To provide an understanding of how the elderly living in rural areas view mobility and integrate it into their daily lives is the main aim of the paper. Using the results of a qualitative study, this paper emphasises causes leading to travel decisions and illustrates the importance of emotions and the functional aspect of maintaining health. Most importantly, this paper will show the value of social contacts. Even if everyday needs, such as grocery shopping or a trip to the doctor, prove to be the reason for ity, occurrences of social interaction are which count and which influence the lives of elderly people living in the countryside. Finally, based on the findings, the implications for transportation planning and policy will be outlined and explored.

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • The elderly
  • Rural areas
  • Countryside
  • Everyday life
  • Routines
  • Qualitative study
access type Open Access

Rooms Available? The Rediscovery of the Relevance of Student Housing for Local Housing Markets

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 385 - 399

Abstract

Abstract

Due to the rising number of students and an increasing shortage in housing in many university cities, debates about student housing are starting to gain more attention from politics, the media, the housing industry and science. As a result, the state of knowledge about the structure and development of the local housing market and its impact is rather limited in both theory and practice. Reliable and comprehensive information about the housing market and its evolution are essential for socio-political and housing-related decisions. This paper aims at filling this research gap. After describing factors related to the rising demand in student housing, case studies focusing on student housing and its political significance are presented. Furthermore, this study characterises the development and structure of supply as well as the demand for student housing, and how these factors interrelate with the local housing market. In light of the current discussion about the housing shortages, the consequences of the rental market conditions for students are highlighted. Finally, this paper concludes by providing possible approaches to ensure market transparency

Keywords

  • Student housing
  • University cities
  • Housing market
  • Interlinking effects
  • Renter’s market
  • Landlord’s market
  • Studentification
access type Open Access

Collaborative Consumption, Social Capital and the Neighbourhood. An Approximation

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 401 - 413

Abstract

Abstract

Both, neighbourhoods and Collaborative Consumption (sometimes also referred to as Sharing Economy or New Economy), are the loci of interest in current scientific and political discussions that oscillate between the global and the local. This article aims to link the concepts’ potential procedural similarities more closely than has been done so far. Both of these concepts consider societal problems and potentials to be affecting the micro level; they form a part of the currently undergoing local shift. In order to explore this potential in more detail, we will present a typology of different platforms of Collaborative Consumption that takes into consideration both, social capital and relevant characteristics of a neighbourhood. Based on this analysis, we will argue that many of these platforms, despite their emphasis on neighbourly relationships, don’t necessarily foster an accumulation of social capital within neighbourhoods. However, there is one distinguished type, we define it as “the autotelic-oriented one”, which can potentially have a positive impact on neighbourhood development. Only this type enables the accumulation of social capital, attempts to overcome socio-economic barriers and provides reciprocity mechanisms for the exchange of favours. This type could be fruitful for neighbourhoods and should be taken into account more seriously by researchers and professionals in this field. We will argue that Collaborative Consumption can hence result in a “neighbourhood 2.0” – a community that is complementarity strengthened through web-based services.

Keywords

  • Collaborative consumption
  • Neighbourhoods
  • Social capital
  • Local shift
access type Open Access

Subsidies for Regional Networks: Measurable Effects for Regional Development?

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 415 - 426

Abstract

Abstract

The change of paradigm of the policy for rural regions towards cooperative and actor-orientated regional development nowadays is hardly doubted. Nevertheless there are few findings on the effectivity of these subsidiaries. Presented in this article is the result of a nation-wide regional statistical analysis to the correlation of the support-programmes for cooperative regional development on one hand and established regional development indicators und the other hand. The distinctive feature to other analyses is the simultaneous analysis of several programmes supported by several political departements over a longer period. The result is obvious: in fact, effects for the regional development are not commensurable. This remarkable finding should give impulses for the enhancements of the instruments of rural development.

Keywords

  • Regional development
  • Support programmes
  • Regional networks
  • Effects
  • Efficiency
access type Open Access

Asymmetrical Recovery in Cities After Disaster. The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 427 - 439

Abstract

Abstract

When flood events trigger disaster in cities, the recovery process constitutes a complex field of activity covering urban space, state institutions, and impacted citizens. Recovery may not occur evenly, but instead, asymmetrically. In the case of the city of New Orleans in the USA, heavily hit by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, this can be observed particularly in the city’s Lower Ninth Ward. Here, a rebuilding program oriented towards homeowners was supposed to enable citizens to return. Why couldn’t the plans and programs for recovery prevent the emergence of asymmetric recovery in the Lower Ninth Ward? This paper shows that these plans and programs didn’t adequately respond to urban spatial and social conditions and weren’t oriented towards the vulnerability of impacted citizens. For this purpose, empirical data collected via quantitative and qualitative methods in 2007 and 2009 are featured here. The aim is to support knowledge-based planning recommendations that address the vulnerability of impacted citizens and to contribute to a discussion on just and sustainable recovery in and of cities after disaster.

Keywords

  • Disaster recovery
  • Floods
  • Disaster
  • Vulnerability
  • Urban planning

Rezension

access type Open Access

Wie werden Landschaften gemacht? Sozialwissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf die Konstituierung von Kulturlandschaften

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 441 - 443

Abstract

access type Open Access

Tourismus und Regionalentwicklung in Bayern

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 445 - 446

Abstract

access type Open Access

Wirtschaftliche Effekte des Tourismus in Biosphärenreservaten Deutschlands

Published Online: 31 Oct 2014
Page range: 447 - 448

Abstract

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