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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

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Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

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Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Große Ereignisse

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 273 - 274

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Revealing Relevant Proximities. Knowledge Networks in the Maritime Economy in a Spatial, Functional and Relational Perspective

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 275 - 291

Abstract

Abstract

The maritime economy as a heterogeneous innovation system has ongoing relevance to the successful spatial and functional development of regions in Europe. A strong technological knowledge base underpins the competitiveness of the maritime economy, which is grounded in distinct spatial structures and proximities. The simultaneous relevance of global and local knowledge is particularly pronounced in the maritime economy through its inherent relevance to globalization and structural change. Conventional classifications of the maritime economy embedded in the discussion of the spatialization of knowledge-intensive activities and global value chains, however, limit the analysis to certain parts of the maritime cluster. This paper examines the applicability of various discourses on interactive knowledge generation and application as a process, based on a comprehensive dataset derived from cooperative links within the maritime economy of northern Germany. It suggests a framework for analysis that is activity based and focuses on the concurrent presence of different dimensions of proximity across value-creating systems. We explore spatial patterns by means of social network analysis. These patterns are industry-specific and have the potential to inform efforts to increase functional as well as physical connectivity in regions. The empirical analysis begins with the individual firm as an actor seeking to optimize its location for the purpose of competitiveness. It proposes an approach that is rooted in the ongoing discussion on spatial and functional dispositions for innovation activity and that bridges the dichotomy of knowledge-intensive services and manufacturing activities in the maritime economy.

Keywords

  • Maritime economy
  • Knowledge networks
  • Spatial development
  • Proximity
  • Urban system
  • Germany
Open Access

Alternative Sites for Wind Power: Calculation of the Output Potential from Sites in Open Landscape and Forest Territory in Bavaria, Germany

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 293 - 308

Abstract

Abstract

The consideration of alternative sites for renewable energies should not only be a reaction to dwindling acceptance of the transformation of the energy system. Rather it should be incorporated at the beginning of any site planning process and thereby enable transparent, democratic negotiations about sustainable land use. On the one hand, alternative sites can result from successively expanding or limiting the search area for sites by mini- or maximizing restriction criteria. On the other hand, a certain search area may be extended by considering a category of space not previously included in the site calculation process. Both aspects will be discussed in the following attempt to develop spatial corridors for the implementation of the transformation of the Bavarian wind energy system. The spatial patterns resulting from the GIS-based site analysis for wind power plants may serve as a basis for the allocation of exclusion, restriction, and priority areas in regional planning. Simply standardizing procedures among the various regional planning associations based on potential analysis may prevent a patchwork of energy strategies and may guide site planning processes towards a balanced spatial development. It is the main goal of this study to investigate the suitability concerning usage for wind power of sites on both open landscapes as well as in forest territories. Thereby those spatial patterns of wind power are being identified that not only meet the specifications of the “bavarian wind decree”, but furthermore satisfy the qualitative demand for a maximum socio-ecological compatibility.

Keywords

  • Site planning
  • Wind energy
  • Renewable energies
  • Forest
  • Open landscape
  • Energy concept
  • Land use conflict
  • Bavaria
Open Access

Town- and Spatial Planners – Transformations of the Profession

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 309 - 321

Abstract

Aabstract

The profession of spatial planners started in Germany in 1968 with its first belated planning-department apart from town-planning education within architectural faculties, shaping its thinking in contrast to architecturalled town-planning. Regarding the career of 45 years of planner-education, we find fundamental transformations of the planners’ thinking, leading from a rather autonomous start-off apart from established planning, ending up in the acceptance of the predominance of self-regulating markets and governance structures. Led by incremental thinking and negotiation, spatial planners have separated themselves from physical planning as well as from planning-theory which could guideline their thinking, renouncing goal-led development and formal plans; on the other hand town planners have restricted themselves to informal physical plans with little power of implementation. Especially since the financial crisis after 2000 planning gives way to neoliberal arrangements, resulting in growing imbalance and fails in spatial development. So the demand of sovereign thinking to crosscounter this development is increasing. This leads to a challenge for planning-departments to reconsider their educational ambitions and to enlarge knowledge and skills by transdisciplinary cooperation to develop answers to the unsolved questions beyond the old separation of disciplines.

Keywords

  • Planning education
  • Urban design thinking
  • Incrementalism
  • Governance
  • Neoliberalism
Open Access

Quantification of Reurbanization

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 323 - 336

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with spatial processes of demographic change in the city and the region of Hamburg by using official statistics. It aims to answer the questions if there is a stable (re)concentration of population in transport-reducing settlement structures, i.e. functionally mixed quarters that are easily accessible by public transport, and if a new preference for living in cities can be observed. Knowing that it is actually possible to measure reurbanization in Hamburg applying common concepts, the paper analyses patterns of migration in a more detailed way. This reveals that the growing population within the city and the concentration of population in the core mainly result from two developments: inter-regional migration grows (mainly from other cities into the core) and the city’s residents move less often to the outskirts. The inner-regional processes of population change result from a changed migration behavior of persons over the age of 30 as well as children and cohort effects of the over 45-year-olds, whereas a changed behavior of young professionals and students (18- to 29-year-olds) causes the growing inter-regional exchange. The findings support existing theses regarding the reasons for reurbanization. Notably the thesis that the group of aged persons supports reurbanization can be observed in the quantitative data.

Keywords

  • Reurbanization
  • Migration
  • Measurement
  • Time series
  • City region
  • Hamburg
Open Access

Rent Price Levels of Housing Units of Various Owner Categories: A Comparative Location Specific Examination in the Context of the Internationalization of the Housing Sector

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 337 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

Weisen Wohnungen von Finanzinvestoren ein vom Mittel abweichendes Niveau der Mietpreise auf? Die Untersuchung in diesem Beitrag vollzieht auf der Basis schriftlich erhobener Wohnungscharakteristika und Mietpreisangaben über die Zuordnung der zur Preisfindung gültigen ortsüblichen Vergleichsmieten eine vergleichende Querschnittsbetrachtung der Mietpreisgestaltung verschiedener Eigentümergruppen an drei ausgewählten Standorten mit Präsenz neuer Investorentypen. Diese Standorte befinden sich in Dresden, Lübeck und Wuppertal. Für sie konnte erstmals belegt werden, dass entgegen der weit verbreiteten Annahme für die Wohnungen von Finanzinvestoren keine signifikant überdurchschnittlichen Mietpreisniveaus feststellbar sind. Vielmehr konnten für andere Eigentümergruppen signifikant vom Gesamtmittel abweichende Mietpreise und damit ein Einfluss bestimmter Eigentümerschaften auf das Mietpreisniveau belegt werden. Diese standortübergreifenden Ergebnisse bestätigten sich auch anhand der Betrachtung von Neuvertragsmieten und anhand standörtlicher Untersuchungen. Bei der Analyse wurden unter Verwendung des hedonischen Ansatzes die verschiedenen wohnwertbestimmenden Eigenschaften der einzelnen Mieteinheiten, die in erster Linie Einfluss auf die Höhe der Kaltmieten haben, berücksichtigt.

Keywords

  • Housing market
  • Rental prices
  • Financial investors
  • Privatization
  • Hedonic approach

Rezension

Open Access

Mobilitäten und Immobilitäten: Menschen – Ideen – Dinge – Kulturen – Kapital

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 357 - 358

Abstract

Open Access

Klimawandel und Nutzung von regenerativen Energien als Herausforderungen für die Raumordnung

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 359 - 360

Abstract

Open Access

Städtebauliche Projektentwicklung durch private Immobilienunternehmen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 361 - 363

Abstract

Open Access

Raumentwicklung im Klimawandel. Herausforderungen für die räumliche Planung

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 365 - 367

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Große Ereignisse

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 273 - 274

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Revealing Relevant Proximities. Knowledge Networks in the Maritime Economy in a Spatial, Functional and Relational Perspective

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 275 - 291

Abstract

Abstract

The maritime economy as a heterogeneous innovation system has ongoing relevance to the successful spatial and functional development of regions in Europe. A strong technological knowledge base underpins the competitiveness of the maritime economy, which is grounded in distinct spatial structures and proximities. The simultaneous relevance of global and local knowledge is particularly pronounced in the maritime economy through its inherent relevance to globalization and structural change. Conventional classifications of the maritime economy embedded in the discussion of the spatialization of knowledge-intensive activities and global value chains, however, limit the analysis to certain parts of the maritime cluster. This paper examines the applicability of various discourses on interactive knowledge generation and application as a process, based on a comprehensive dataset derived from cooperative links within the maritime economy of northern Germany. It suggests a framework for analysis that is activity based and focuses on the concurrent presence of different dimensions of proximity across value-creating systems. We explore spatial patterns by means of social network analysis. These patterns are industry-specific and have the potential to inform efforts to increase functional as well as physical connectivity in regions. The empirical analysis begins with the individual firm as an actor seeking to optimize its location for the purpose of competitiveness. It proposes an approach that is rooted in the ongoing discussion on spatial and functional dispositions for innovation activity and that bridges the dichotomy of knowledge-intensive services and manufacturing activities in the maritime economy.

Keywords

  • Maritime economy
  • Knowledge networks
  • Spatial development
  • Proximity
  • Urban system
  • Germany
Open Access

Alternative Sites for Wind Power: Calculation of the Output Potential from Sites in Open Landscape and Forest Territory in Bavaria, Germany

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 293 - 308

Abstract

Abstract

The consideration of alternative sites for renewable energies should not only be a reaction to dwindling acceptance of the transformation of the energy system. Rather it should be incorporated at the beginning of any site planning process and thereby enable transparent, democratic negotiations about sustainable land use. On the one hand, alternative sites can result from successively expanding or limiting the search area for sites by mini- or maximizing restriction criteria. On the other hand, a certain search area may be extended by considering a category of space not previously included in the site calculation process. Both aspects will be discussed in the following attempt to develop spatial corridors for the implementation of the transformation of the Bavarian wind energy system. The spatial patterns resulting from the GIS-based site analysis for wind power plants may serve as a basis for the allocation of exclusion, restriction, and priority areas in regional planning. Simply standardizing procedures among the various regional planning associations based on potential analysis may prevent a patchwork of energy strategies and may guide site planning processes towards a balanced spatial development. It is the main goal of this study to investigate the suitability concerning usage for wind power of sites on both open landscapes as well as in forest territories. Thereby those spatial patterns of wind power are being identified that not only meet the specifications of the “bavarian wind decree”, but furthermore satisfy the qualitative demand for a maximum socio-ecological compatibility.

Keywords

  • Site planning
  • Wind energy
  • Renewable energies
  • Forest
  • Open landscape
  • Energy concept
  • Land use conflict
  • Bavaria
Open Access

Town- and Spatial Planners – Transformations of the Profession

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 309 - 321

Abstract

Aabstract

The profession of spatial planners started in Germany in 1968 with its first belated planning-department apart from town-planning education within architectural faculties, shaping its thinking in contrast to architecturalled town-planning. Regarding the career of 45 years of planner-education, we find fundamental transformations of the planners’ thinking, leading from a rather autonomous start-off apart from established planning, ending up in the acceptance of the predominance of self-regulating markets and governance structures. Led by incremental thinking and negotiation, spatial planners have separated themselves from physical planning as well as from planning-theory which could guideline their thinking, renouncing goal-led development and formal plans; on the other hand town planners have restricted themselves to informal physical plans with little power of implementation. Especially since the financial crisis after 2000 planning gives way to neoliberal arrangements, resulting in growing imbalance and fails in spatial development. So the demand of sovereign thinking to crosscounter this development is increasing. This leads to a challenge for planning-departments to reconsider their educational ambitions and to enlarge knowledge and skills by transdisciplinary cooperation to develop answers to the unsolved questions beyond the old separation of disciplines.

Keywords

  • Planning education
  • Urban design thinking
  • Incrementalism
  • Governance
  • Neoliberalism
Open Access

Quantification of Reurbanization

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 323 - 336

Abstract

Abstract

This paper deals with spatial processes of demographic change in the city and the region of Hamburg by using official statistics. It aims to answer the questions if there is a stable (re)concentration of population in transport-reducing settlement structures, i.e. functionally mixed quarters that are easily accessible by public transport, and if a new preference for living in cities can be observed. Knowing that it is actually possible to measure reurbanization in Hamburg applying common concepts, the paper analyses patterns of migration in a more detailed way. This reveals that the growing population within the city and the concentration of population in the core mainly result from two developments: inter-regional migration grows (mainly from other cities into the core) and the city’s residents move less often to the outskirts. The inner-regional processes of population change result from a changed migration behavior of persons over the age of 30 as well as children and cohort effects of the over 45-year-olds, whereas a changed behavior of young professionals and students (18- to 29-year-olds) causes the growing inter-regional exchange. The findings support existing theses regarding the reasons for reurbanization. Notably the thesis that the group of aged persons supports reurbanization can be observed in the quantitative data.

Keywords

  • Reurbanization
  • Migration
  • Measurement
  • Time series
  • City region
  • Hamburg
Open Access

Rent Price Levels of Housing Units of Various Owner Categories: A Comparative Location Specific Examination in the Context of the Internationalization of the Housing Sector

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 337 - 356

Abstract

Abstract

Weisen Wohnungen von Finanzinvestoren ein vom Mittel abweichendes Niveau der Mietpreise auf? Die Untersuchung in diesem Beitrag vollzieht auf der Basis schriftlich erhobener Wohnungscharakteristika und Mietpreisangaben über die Zuordnung der zur Preisfindung gültigen ortsüblichen Vergleichsmieten eine vergleichende Querschnittsbetrachtung der Mietpreisgestaltung verschiedener Eigentümergruppen an drei ausgewählten Standorten mit Präsenz neuer Investorentypen. Diese Standorte befinden sich in Dresden, Lübeck und Wuppertal. Für sie konnte erstmals belegt werden, dass entgegen der weit verbreiteten Annahme für die Wohnungen von Finanzinvestoren keine signifikant überdurchschnittlichen Mietpreisniveaus feststellbar sind. Vielmehr konnten für andere Eigentümergruppen signifikant vom Gesamtmittel abweichende Mietpreise und damit ein Einfluss bestimmter Eigentümerschaften auf das Mietpreisniveau belegt werden. Diese standortübergreifenden Ergebnisse bestätigten sich auch anhand der Betrachtung von Neuvertragsmieten und anhand standörtlicher Untersuchungen. Bei der Analyse wurden unter Verwendung des hedonischen Ansatzes die verschiedenen wohnwertbestimmenden Eigenschaften der einzelnen Mieteinheiten, die in erster Linie Einfluss auf die Höhe der Kaltmieten haben, berücksichtigt.

Keywords

  • Housing market
  • Rental prices
  • Financial investors
  • Privatization
  • Hedonic approach

Rezension

Open Access

Mobilitäten und Immobilitäten: Menschen – Ideen – Dinge – Kulturen – Kapital

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 357 - 358

Abstract

Open Access

Klimawandel und Nutzung von regenerativen Energien als Herausforderungen für die Raumordnung

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 359 - 360

Abstract

Open Access

Städtebauliche Projektentwicklung durch private Immobilienunternehmen

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 361 - 363

Abstract

Open Access

Raumentwicklung im Klimawandel. Herausforderungen für die räumliche Planung

Published Online: 31 Aug 2014
Page range: 365 - 367

Abstract

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