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TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Regionalentwicklung, Migration und Fläche

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 453 - 454

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Female migration pattern in rural Sachsen-Anhalt: implications for gender-sensitive regional development

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 455 - 469

Abstract

Abstract

In many regions of Europe pronounced disparities between the proportions of women and men in younger age groups can be observed. While cities tend to display a surplus of young women, sparsely populated rural areas are often characterised by a surplus of young men. Rural areas in the new federal states (former East Germany) are especially affected by a striking "lack" of women. This paper analyses the causes of this demographic imbalance using the example of Saxony-Anhalt and investigates its implications for regional development. In-depth interviews with young women, a questionnaire for school pupils both male and female, and the analysis of demographic data provide a basis for demonstrating how a specific path of demographic development has been generated by the crisis of social and economic transformation that followed reunification, the regional economic structure and the emergence of a culture of migration in rural Saxony-Anhalt. The primary factors that explain the migration of young women are long ongoing difficulties on the labour market, negatively perceived career opportunities, and a low level of identification with the region of origin. The findings of the investigation show that the analysis of the phenomenon of unbalanced gender proportions not only draws attention to gender-specific realms but also always touches upon the question of equivalent living conditions and spatial discourses.

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Migration
  • Rural areas
  • Regional development
  • Culture of out-migration
  • Saxony-Anhalt
Open Access

Residential Housing Construction in Shrinking Regions: Negative Development or Necessity?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 471 - 486

Abstract

Abstract

Although former East Germany has had continuously shrinking populations for many years, flats have been simultaneously newly built and torn down nationwide, according to the development program of the Federal Government and the states. This housing policy was previously considered a negative development. The consequences of demographic change show parallel development of residential housing construction and demolition. This is not unusual, nor a negative development. The structures of demand and supply can deviate from each other due to changing population structure, especially because flats are immobile and durable consumer goods. The development of stable housing markets in shrinking areas is a special challenge for housing and public policy. This paper uses the example of Saxony to illustrate the challenges faced by regional housing markets where demographic change is occurring and discusses the background and connections. The current development of residential housing construction is unsatisfactory and vacancies are increasing, which leads to another question: how can future housing needs be satisfied while simultaneously avoiding the consumption of new land for housing?

Keywords

  • Housing market development
  • Demographic change
  • Regional divergence
  • Future housing requirements
  • Saxony

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

On the Way to a Better Land Use Statistics

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 487 - 495

Abstract

Summary

Sustainable land use development requires a reporting system, which compares the actual development with the formulated goals and guiding principles of a sustainable land use policy. The current official land survey in Germany cannot longer meet the growing requirements on land use statistics regarding accuracy, reliability, timeliness, and relevance. Both, the use of cadastral data as primary data source of the statistical land survey, and also the sole computation of total areas of selected types of land use should be reviewed in this context. This paper highlights the problems of the database of current land use statistics, which are increasing significantly by technological changes of the cadastre. The benefits of using topographic geo-based data for the calculation are discussed. The monitor of the settlement and open space development (IÖR-Monitor) analysed this data and provides the indicator-based results in form of interactive maps and tables on the Internet. In addition, analysis of building structure and its change could be made based on real estate cadastre data. So land political sustainability goals as “inside before outside” would be verifiable. The contribution of this paper is to initiate a broad debate in this complex, interdisciplinary field between statistics, surveying, real estate management, geoinformatics and spatial development policy.

Keywords

  • Land use
  • Statistics
  • Official land survey
  • Indicators
  • Monitoring
  • Settlement development
Open Access

Tradable Planning Permits: From an Academic Discourse via a Pilot Project to Planning Practice?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 497 - 507

Abstract

Abstract

For more than 15 years now, researchers and policy makers have been discussing the transfer of trading programs from the regulation of emissions to the regulation of land development. However, the debate remained limited to researchers for a long time, until the German government initiated preparation of a nationwide "pilot project" in 2009. This paper reports on the results of the preliminary project funded by the Federal Environment Agency. An interdisciplinary team developed an outline proposal for the "pilot project". After a summary of the consequences, benefits and cost of tradable planning permits in general, the paper presents and discusses how the project should be organized in detail. The proposal suggests a controlled field experiment in combination with extensive municipal case studies. The paper concludes with a perspective of the expected outcome of the "pilot project" which has started in 2012.

Keywords

  • Land consumption
  • Land-use Land-use management
  • Growth management Market experiments
  • Tradable planning permits

Rezension

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Regionalentwicklung, Migration und Fläche

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 453 - 454

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Female migration pattern in rural Sachsen-Anhalt: implications for gender-sensitive regional development

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 455 - 469

Abstract

Abstract

In many regions of Europe pronounced disparities between the proportions of women and men in younger age groups can be observed. While cities tend to display a surplus of young women, sparsely populated rural areas are often characterised by a surplus of young men. Rural areas in the new federal states (former East Germany) are especially affected by a striking "lack" of women. This paper analyses the causes of this demographic imbalance using the example of Saxony-Anhalt and investigates its implications for regional development. In-depth interviews with young women, a questionnaire for school pupils both male and female, and the analysis of demographic data provide a basis for demonstrating how a specific path of demographic development has been generated by the crisis of social and economic transformation that followed reunification, the regional economic structure and the emergence of a culture of migration in rural Saxony-Anhalt. The primary factors that explain the migration of young women are long ongoing difficulties on the labour market, negatively perceived career opportunities, and a low level of identification with the region of origin. The findings of the investigation show that the analysis of the phenomenon of unbalanced gender proportions not only draws attention to gender-specific realms but also always touches upon the question of equivalent living conditions and spatial discourses.

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Migration
  • Rural areas
  • Regional development
  • Culture of out-migration
  • Saxony-Anhalt
Open Access

Residential Housing Construction in Shrinking Regions: Negative Development or Necessity?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 471 - 486

Abstract

Abstract

Although former East Germany has had continuously shrinking populations for many years, flats have been simultaneously newly built and torn down nationwide, according to the development program of the Federal Government and the states. This housing policy was previously considered a negative development. The consequences of demographic change show parallel development of residential housing construction and demolition. This is not unusual, nor a negative development. The structures of demand and supply can deviate from each other due to changing population structure, especially because flats are immobile and durable consumer goods. The development of stable housing markets in shrinking areas is a special challenge for housing and public policy. This paper uses the example of Saxony to illustrate the challenges faced by regional housing markets where demographic change is occurring and discusses the background and connections. The current development of residential housing construction is unsatisfactory and vacancies are increasing, which leads to another question: how can future housing needs be satisfied while simultaneously avoiding the consumption of new land for housing?

Keywords

  • Housing market development
  • Demographic change
  • Regional divergence
  • Future housing requirements
  • Saxony

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

Open Access

On the Way to a Better Land Use Statistics

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 487 - 495

Abstract

Summary

Sustainable land use development requires a reporting system, which compares the actual development with the formulated goals and guiding principles of a sustainable land use policy. The current official land survey in Germany cannot longer meet the growing requirements on land use statistics regarding accuracy, reliability, timeliness, and relevance. Both, the use of cadastral data as primary data source of the statistical land survey, and also the sole computation of total areas of selected types of land use should be reviewed in this context. This paper highlights the problems of the database of current land use statistics, which are increasing significantly by technological changes of the cadastre. The benefits of using topographic geo-based data for the calculation are discussed. The monitor of the settlement and open space development (IÖR-Monitor) analysed this data and provides the indicator-based results in form of interactive maps and tables on the Internet. In addition, analysis of building structure and its change could be made based on real estate cadastre data. So land political sustainability goals as “inside before outside” would be verifiable. The contribution of this paper is to initiate a broad debate in this complex, interdisciplinary field between statistics, surveying, real estate management, geoinformatics and spatial development policy.

Keywords

  • Land use
  • Statistics
  • Official land survey
  • Indicators
  • Monitoring
  • Settlement development
Open Access

Tradable Planning Permits: From an Academic Discourse via a Pilot Project to Planning Practice?

Published Online: 31 Dec 2013
Page range: 497 - 507

Abstract

Abstract

For more than 15 years now, researchers and policy makers have been discussing the transfer of trading programs from the regulation of emissions to the regulation of land development. However, the debate remained limited to researchers for a long time, until the German government initiated preparation of a nationwide "pilot project" in 2009. This paper reports on the results of the preliminary project funded by the Federal Environment Agency. An interdisciplinary team developed an outline proposal for the "pilot project". After a summary of the consequences, benefits and cost of tradable planning permits in general, the paper presents and discusses how the project should be organized in detail. The proposal suggests a controlled field experiment in combination with extensive municipal case studies. The paper concludes with a perspective of the expected outcome of the "pilot project" which has started in 2012.

Keywords

  • Land consumption
  • Land-use Land-use management
  • Growth management Market experiments
  • Tradable planning permits

Rezension

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