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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Article

access type Open Access

Internationale Migration und (räumliche) Integration – Zeit für neues Denken

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 177 - 179

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Migration as Local Development Potential—The Local Support Infrastructure for Economic Actors with Migratory Backgrounds

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 181 - 193

Abstract

Abstract

The perception of immigration to Germany in the media, public discourse, and political debates is ambivalent. One perspective stresses the problems of immigration by characterising migrant settings as “parallel societies” inhabited by people who are reluctant to integrate into the receiving society. On the other hand—and with a particular focus on demographic change and the economic sustainability of the Federal Republic of Germany—the presence of migrants is increasingly seen as a source of valuable contributions. This paper elaborates on such perceptions of migrants as assets. Informed by an internet based study the paper explores in how far local authorities in Germany acknowledge and support the potential contributions of migrant populations to local and regional development processes. Our findings reveal that attempts to tap into the potential of migrant communities are largely restricted to big cities. Outside major agglomerations migrants tend to be primarily seen in the light of their assumed need for support to integrate into local job markets and societies. The focus then is on education and social policy issues rather than the promotion of economic or urban development. Drawing on these findings, we argue that migrant economies in particular bear considerable, yet hardly recognized resources for urban and regional development. Policies geared towards the targeted support of economic actors with migratory backgrounds would help to mobilize these resources.

Keywords

  • Economic actors
  • Migrant background
  • Migrant economy
  • Urban development
  • Local affairs
  • Integration policy
access type Open Access

Multilocality and Transnationality: New Challenges for Urban Development and Urban Policy

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 195 - 205

Abstract

Abstract

Multilocality and transnationality are important expressions of late-modern lives. A pronounced attachment to more than one place is a common characteristic of the various types discussed by scholars. People are thus increasingly less related to only one (residential) location. This is facilitated through networks between groups and individuals, while differentiated social spaces emerge between the involved places. With regard to urban development, the relevance of these processes has not been fully examined yet. This applies for research as well as for the cities themselves, who only marginally refer to multilocal and transnational phenomena in their strategies and actions and continue to adhere to a territorial logic. The quantitative and qualitative significance, however, does call for a more thorough consideration in the context of urban governance. This contribution outlines some of the consequences of these processes for urban development and specifies approaches that consider the changing patterns of spatial-temporal behaviour.

Keywords

  • Urban development
  • Multilocality
  • Transnationality
  • Migration
  • Urban politics
  • Residential behavior
  • Diversity
  • Integration
  • Attachment to places

Schlüsselwort

  • Stadtentwicklung
  • Multilokalität
  • Transnationalität
  • Migration
  • Stadtpolitik
  • Wohnstandortverhalten
  • Diversität
  • Integration
  • Verortung
access type Open Access

Social Bridges and Boundary Drawing in the City: the Turkish Middle Class in Immigrant Neighbourhoods

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 207 - 219

Abstract

Abstract

Social mixing in disadvantaged neighbourhoods is supposed to have various stabilizing effects. Hence, the moving out of middle class households is critically perceived. The question is, however, whether upwardly mobile middle class households “automatically” move out of disadvantaged neighbourhoods. It has been shown that there are different ways of integration for the second-generation immigrants. One difference might be found in the motivation to stay in or leave ethnically segregated neighbourhoods. In the German context, there is hardly any research so far that empirically deals with reasons of the middle class to stay in segregated neighbourhoods which are usually also characterized by social deprivation. In this paper, we argue that the staying of middle class Turkish migrants can be explained by their neighbourhood crossing-networks, as well as small-scale social and spatial boundary drawings within the neighbourhood. With this combination of bridging ties and boundary drawing, households are also able to use the potentials of their neighbourhood and at the same time access resources outside the neighbourhood, without having to relocate. The argumentation is based on qualitative studies in Berlin and Duisburg, which analyze neighbourhood choice of Turkish migrants. The main result is that staying can be explained with locally based family ties that provide everyday support. Moreover, we see that households do have diverse ties across neighbourhood borders, which facilitate their staying put, in spite of their spatial proximity to households of lower social strata. Small scale social and symbolic boundaries, as well as a clear focus on routinely used contexts outside the neighbourhood, point to the ambivalent effect the middle class might have as a stabilizing factor in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Keywords

  • Turkish middle class
  • Disadvantaged neighbourhoods
  • Residential choice
  • Segregation
  • Social mix
access type Open Access

Borderless Everyday Live: Residence and Labour Migration as an Expression of Transnational Lifestyles Along the German-Luxembourgish and the German-Polish Borderregions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 221 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

National borders inside the European Union are open contact zones of transnational everyday lives. The Schengen Agreement ensures the free movement of EU citizens, leading to new forms of international migration and illustrating the European integration process on the local level. Migrants move to the neighbouring country to live or work there. Cross-border residential property and labour markets develop a transnationalisation of everyday lives between neighbouring countries. With the case study region of the municipality of Perl in the German federal state of Saarland and the municipality Amt Löcknitz-Penkun in the German federal state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania the article deals with these cross-border everyday lives. On the one side of the national state borders there is a booming region (Luxembourg or Szczecin) and on the other side there is a structural weak rural German region. This substantially influences these processes. Both case study regions show dealings with these cross-border phenomena and spatial implications.

Keywords

  • Border regions
  • Residential migration
  • Labour migration
  • Transnationality
  • Saarland
  • Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania
access type Open Access

Temporary Integration for a Life in Transition: The Social and Political Responses to the Challenges of a Segmented Urban Immigrant Society in Muscat (Oman)

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 233 - 245

Abstract

Abstract

The contribution examines the issue of international migration and integration from an "alternative" perspective to broaden the view of the social and political challenges discussed to date. The coexistence of heterogeneous groups in urban space is discussed taking the example of Muscat, the capital of the Sultanate of Oman. Since the process of modernization commenced in 1970, the urban society in Muscat has gradually developed into a segmented immigrant society. The special feature of this young, dynamic immigration society is that Oman does not envisage the (permanent) integration of transnational migrants, nor do the latter. Therefore we regard temporary integration as an alternative pattern of social coexistence taking the different perspectives of the parties concerned into account. First, a couple of conceptual observations on an analysis of integration will be offered. Then, the general social and political framework conditions that regulate the working situation of foreigners in Oman—i.e. the sponsorship system and the policy of Omanisation—will be addressed. Building on this, the contribution will go on to discuss the migrants' expectations and opportunities concerning integration based on spatial practice, taking as examples the two central aspects of the choice of place of residence and mobility opportunities. The socio-economic position of employees and recognition based on their professional and educational status prove to be the key criteria in this respect.

Keywords

  • Transnational migration
  • Labor migration
  • Integration
  • Segmentation
  • Spatial practice
  • Oman

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Transnational Ethnic Entrepreneurship. The Case Study of Entrepreneurs of Turkish Origin in Duisburg-Marxloh

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 247 - 259

Abstract

Abstract

Within the debate of transnational migration the phenomenon of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship is gaining in importance. Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship—in comparison to the already widely-discussed “traditional” ethnic economy—exhibits special features, i.e. its integration into cross-border production and distribution networks as well as modes of transnational living and working. On basis of an explorative study of Turkish entrepreneurs in Duisburg-Marxloh (Germany), the paper discusses different forms of intensity of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship concerning actor-specific and structural characteristics. It also illustrates the importance of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship for the local economy and the general development of the city quarter. Three “generations” of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship as well as three intensity-forms of transnational economic activities have been identified. Furthermore, the findings ascertain the entrepreneurs’ importance for the stabilization of the city quarter, regarding in particular its structural development as well as its image upgrading. At the same time the results show that the interconnection between transnational ethnic entrepreneurs as well as their integration into urban development strategies and institutional measures is on a low level. Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship as a strategic potential for urban development has yet not been fully explored, further research on this subject and planning action are required.

Keywords

  • Transnational migration
  • Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship
  • Ethnic economy
  • Turkish migrants
  • City quarter development
  • Duisburg-Marxloh
access type Open Access

Conditions of immigration and inclusion in East Germany—a review

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 261 - 271

Abstract

Abstract

It is not only the case that new immigration and transit countries have emerged in recent years within Europe. Also within states with existing migration histories, target regions have become differentiated and migrants have reached places that previously have had but little experience of inter-cultural living. Discussion of the issues related to growing ethnic-cultural diversity in Germany focuses primarily on the western federal states, and particularly on large cities within them. Nonetheless, in recent years new clusters of international immigration have emerged in the eastern German states, even if they appear small in comparison to the traditional target regions. The majority of these clusters are established by the deliberate distribution throughout the country of new immigrants, particularly of asylum seekers and, especially in the past, of ethnic German immigrants from Eastern Europe and of Jewish quota refugees. The patterns of immigration, integration and social-spatial segregation differ not only from those in the western federal states but are also themselves extremely diverse. Against the background of the substantial neglect of East German states in migration research and political concepts about inter-cultural living, this paper aims to provide a summarising overview of the results of existing studies.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Inclusion
  • Integration
  • Ethnic segregation
  • East Germany
  • Demographic change

Rezension

access type Open Access

Land Policy: Planning and the Spatial Consequences of Property. Farnham: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 22 Tab., 29 Abb., 292 S.

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 273 - 275

Abstract

access type Open Access

Daily Spatial Mobilities: Physical and Virtual

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 277 - 279

Abstract

10 Articles

Article

access type Open Access

Internationale Migration und (räumliche) Integration – Zeit für neues Denken

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 177 - 179

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Migration as Local Development Potential—The Local Support Infrastructure for Economic Actors with Migratory Backgrounds

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 181 - 193

Abstract

Abstract

The perception of immigration to Germany in the media, public discourse, and political debates is ambivalent. One perspective stresses the problems of immigration by characterising migrant settings as “parallel societies” inhabited by people who are reluctant to integrate into the receiving society. On the other hand—and with a particular focus on demographic change and the economic sustainability of the Federal Republic of Germany—the presence of migrants is increasingly seen as a source of valuable contributions. This paper elaborates on such perceptions of migrants as assets. Informed by an internet based study the paper explores in how far local authorities in Germany acknowledge and support the potential contributions of migrant populations to local and regional development processes. Our findings reveal that attempts to tap into the potential of migrant communities are largely restricted to big cities. Outside major agglomerations migrants tend to be primarily seen in the light of their assumed need for support to integrate into local job markets and societies. The focus then is on education and social policy issues rather than the promotion of economic or urban development. Drawing on these findings, we argue that migrant economies in particular bear considerable, yet hardly recognized resources for urban and regional development. Policies geared towards the targeted support of economic actors with migratory backgrounds would help to mobilize these resources.

Keywords

  • Economic actors
  • Migrant background
  • Migrant economy
  • Urban development
  • Local affairs
  • Integration policy
access type Open Access

Multilocality and Transnationality: New Challenges for Urban Development and Urban Policy

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 195 - 205

Abstract

Abstract

Multilocality and transnationality are important expressions of late-modern lives. A pronounced attachment to more than one place is a common characteristic of the various types discussed by scholars. People are thus increasingly less related to only one (residential) location. This is facilitated through networks between groups and individuals, while differentiated social spaces emerge between the involved places. With regard to urban development, the relevance of these processes has not been fully examined yet. This applies for research as well as for the cities themselves, who only marginally refer to multilocal and transnational phenomena in their strategies and actions and continue to adhere to a territorial logic. The quantitative and qualitative significance, however, does call for a more thorough consideration in the context of urban governance. This contribution outlines some of the consequences of these processes for urban development and specifies approaches that consider the changing patterns of spatial-temporal behaviour.

Keywords

  • Urban development
  • Multilocality
  • Transnationality
  • Migration
  • Urban politics
  • Residential behavior
  • Diversity
  • Integration
  • Attachment to places

Schlüsselwort

  • Stadtentwicklung
  • Multilokalität
  • Transnationalität
  • Migration
  • Stadtpolitik
  • Wohnstandortverhalten
  • Diversität
  • Integration
  • Verortung
access type Open Access

Social Bridges and Boundary Drawing in the City: the Turkish Middle Class in Immigrant Neighbourhoods

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 207 - 219

Abstract

Abstract

Social mixing in disadvantaged neighbourhoods is supposed to have various stabilizing effects. Hence, the moving out of middle class households is critically perceived. The question is, however, whether upwardly mobile middle class households “automatically” move out of disadvantaged neighbourhoods. It has been shown that there are different ways of integration for the second-generation immigrants. One difference might be found in the motivation to stay in or leave ethnically segregated neighbourhoods. In the German context, there is hardly any research so far that empirically deals with reasons of the middle class to stay in segregated neighbourhoods which are usually also characterized by social deprivation. In this paper, we argue that the staying of middle class Turkish migrants can be explained by their neighbourhood crossing-networks, as well as small-scale social and spatial boundary drawings within the neighbourhood. With this combination of bridging ties and boundary drawing, households are also able to use the potentials of their neighbourhood and at the same time access resources outside the neighbourhood, without having to relocate. The argumentation is based on qualitative studies in Berlin and Duisburg, which analyze neighbourhood choice of Turkish migrants. The main result is that staying can be explained with locally based family ties that provide everyday support. Moreover, we see that households do have diverse ties across neighbourhood borders, which facilitate their staying put, in spite of their spatial proximity to households of lower social strata. Small scale social and symbolic boundaries, as well as a clear focus on routinely used contexts outside the neighbourhood, point to the ambivalent effect the middle class might have as a stabilizing factor in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Keywords

  • Turkish middle class
  • Disadvantaged neighbourhoods
  • Residential choice
  • Segregation
  • Social mix
access type Open Access

Borderless Everyday Live: Residence and Labour Migration as an Expression of Transnational Lifestyles Along the German-Luxembourgish and the German-Polish Borderregions

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 221 - 232

Abstract

Abstract

National borders inside the European Union are open contact zones of transnational everyday lives. The Schengen Agreement ensures the free movement of EU citizens, leading to new forms of international migration and illustrating the European integration process on the local level. Migrants move to the neighbouring country to live or work there. Cross-border residential property and labour markets develop a transnationalisation of everyday lives between neighbouring countries. With the case study region of the municipality of Perl in the German federal state of Saarland and the municipality Amt Löcknitz-Penkun in the German federal state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania the article deals with these cross-border everyday lives. On the one side of the national state borders there is a booming region (Luxembourg or Szczecin) and on the other side there is a structural weak rural German region. This substantially influences these processes. Both case study regions show dealings with these cross-border phenomena and spatial implications.

Keywords

  • Border regions
  • Residential migration
  • Labour migration
  • Transnationality
  • Saarland
  • Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania
access type Open Access

Temporary Integration for a Life in Transition: The Social and Political Responses to the Challenges of a Segmented Urban Immigrant Society in Muscat (Oman)

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 233 - 245

Abstract

Abstract

The contribution examines the issue of international migration and integration from an "alternative" perspective to broaden the view of the social and political challenges discussed to date. The coexistence of heterogeneous groups in urban space is discussed taking the example of Muscat, the capital of the Sultanate of Oman. Since the process of modernization commenced in 1970, the urban society in Muscat has gradually developed into a segmented immigrant society. The special feature of this young, dynamic immigration society is that Oman does not envisage the (permanent) integration of transnational migrants, nor do the latter. Therefore we regard temporary integration as an alternative pattern of social coexistence taking the different perspectives of the parties concerned into account. First, a couple of conceptual observations on an analysis of integration will be offered. Then, the general social and political framework conditions that regulate the working situation of foreigners in Oman—i.e. the sponsorship system and the policy of Omanisation—will be addressed. Building on this, the contribution will go on to discuss the migrants' expectations and opportunities concerning integration based on spatial practice, taking as examples the two central aspects of the choice of place of residence and mobility opportunities. The socio-economic position of employees and recognition based on their professional and educational status prove to be the key criteria in this respect.

Keywords

  • Transnational migration
  • Labor migration
  • Integration
  • Segmentation
  • Spatial practice
  • Oman

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Transnational Ethnic Entrepreneurship. The Case Study of Entrepreneurs of Turkish Origin in Duisburg-Marxloh

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 247 - 259

Abstract

Abstract

Within the debate of transnational migration the phenomenon of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship is gaining in importance. Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship—in comparison to the already widely-discussed “traditional” ethnic economy—exhibits special features, i.e. its integration into cross-border production and distribution networks as well as modes of transnational living and working. On basis of an explorative study of Turkish entrepreneurs in Duisburg-Marxloh (Germany), the paper discusses different forms of intensity of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship concerning actor-specific and structural characteristics. It also illustrates the importance of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship for the local economy and the general development of the city quarter. Three “generations” of transnational ethnic entrepreneurship as well as three intensity-forms of transnational economic activities have been identified. Furthermore, the findings ascertain the entrepreneurs’ importance for the stabilization of the city quarter, regarding in particular its structural development as well as its image upgrading. At the same time the results show that the interconnection between transnational ethnic entrepreneurs as well as their integration into urban development strategies and institutional measures is on a low level. Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship as a strategic potential for urban development has yet not been fully explored, further research on this subject and planning action are required.

Keywords

  • Transnational migration
  • Transnational ethnic entrepreneurship
  • Ethnic economy
  • Turkish migrants
  • City quarter development
  • Duisburg-Marxloh
access type Open Access

Conditions of immigration and inclusion in East Germany—a review

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 261 - 271

Abstract

Abstract

It is not only the case that new immigration and transit countries have emerged in recent years within Europe. Also within states with existing migration histories, target regions have become differentiated and migrants have reached places that previously have had but little experience of inter-cultural living. Discussion of the issues related to growing ethnic-cultural diversity in Germany focuses primarily on the western federal states, and particularly on large cities within them. Nonetheless, in recent years new clusters of international immigration have emerged in the eastern German states, even if they appear small in comparison to the traditional target regions. The majority of these clusters are established by the deliberate distribution throughout the country of new immigrants, particularly of asylum seekers and, especially in the past, of ethnic German immigrants from Eastern Europe and of Jewish quota refugees. The patterns of immigration, integration and social-spatial segregation differ not only from those in the western federal states but are also themselves extremely diverse. Against the background of the substantial neglect of East German states in migration research and political concepts about inter-cultural living, this paper aims to provide a summarising overview of the results of existing studies.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • Inclusion
  • Integration
  • Ethnic segregation
  • East Germany
  • Demographic change

Rezension

access type Open Access

Land Policy: Planning and the Spatial Consequences of Property. Farnham: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 22 Tab., 29 Abb., 292 S.

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 273 - 275

Abstract

access type Open Access

Daily Spatial Mobilities: Physical and Virtual

Published Online: 30 Jun 2013
Page range: 277 - 279

Abstract

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