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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Spatial Patterns of Knowledge Forms. The Influence of Transaction Costs on Spatial Concentration of Knowledge-Based Services in the German Urban System

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 175 - 190

Abstract

Abstract

The increasing importance of knowledge as factor in economic processes leads to a reappraisal of economic locations. In this paper spatial consequences of this reappraisal are discussed using the example of the German urban system. Key functions in processes of knowledge production and knowledge use are knowledge-based services. Their locations as well as changes of their locations are of major interest from a geographic perspective. As theory supports assumptions about concentration processes as well as assumptions about processes of de-concentration, empirical evidence is crucial in this context. In this paper it is asked whether the use of different forms of knowledge leads to different spatial patterns of knowledge-based services, depending on the height of transaction costs. It is assumed that the more location specific and the harder to codify the used knowledge form, the more concentrated knowledge-based services that use the respective knowledge form will be.

Keywords

  • Knowledge-based services
  • Occupants
  • Urban system
  • Spatial concentration
  • Knowledge form
  • Transaction costs
access type Open Access

Adaptation at Regional Level: Challenges of a Regional Climate Change Governance

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 191 - 201

Abstract

Abstract

The implementation of climate change adaptation strategies mainly takes part at a regional scale. This scale refers to the functional and spatial dimensions of most climate change effects. Therefore, the regional scale is most adequate for processing cooperative governance formations, for progressing the regulatory framework, for implementing institutional innovations and conducting collective conflict solutions. One of the main findings in the new field of climate adaptation research refers to the necessity of an intersectoral and integrative cross-cutting issue for the consideration of climate change effects. The main aspects of an integrative perspective include a reconciliation of adaptation measures with global climate change mitigation goals, dealing with uncertainties in climate change scenarios, the integration of adaptation measures into various sectors and creating of acceptance for adaptation measures and their implementation instruments. These aspects lead to extensive discussion and coordination needs between governmental and civil society actors. This paper summarizes a framework of regional climate change governance and offers conclusions for the local practice and climate adaptation research. Referring to the action fields of spatial and regional planning, forestry and agriculture in the model region of Northern Hesse, generalizable good practice examples of institutional settings, governance formations and instruments for conducting successful adaptation strategies will be presented.

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Regional governance
  • Regulatory instruments
  • Participation
  • Integration
  • Dealing with uncertainty
access type Open Access

Transnational Strategies for Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts versus Local Needs for Adaptation? The Example of the Baltic Sea Region

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 203 - 216

Abstract

Abstract

Calling for a macro-regional adaptation strategy, the European Union introduced a new strategic level in the discussion on how to adapt to climate change impacts. Based on exploratory studies in three urban regions at the Baltic Sea Coast, Stockholm (Sweden), Rostock (Germany) and Riga (Latvia), the article discusses the contribution and added value of transnational cooperation with regard to adaptation to climate change. Furthermore, it addresses the question of which tasks should be tackled on local and regional or on transnational level. The analysis is based on documents, semi-structured interviews with experts and a participatory observation within a scenario-process. These exploratory studies point out that a transnational cooperation in the Baltic Sea Region could complement local and regional adaptation activities very well. The participants could benefit through exchanges of specific experiences among urban regions with similar problems, but also through a greater awareness for adaptation. However, the added value of transnational cooperation seems to be restricted, regarding for example how and to which extent local activities can be influenced or due to the matter of fact that the given institutional framework constrains the opportunities of action.

Keywords

  • Transnational
  • Macro-regional
  • Adaptation
  • Planning
  • Climate change

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Actual Logistics—Spatial Requirements and Challenges for Regional Development

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 217 - 227

Abstract

Abstract

The importance of logistics has increased during the last few years. Globalization and international division of labour have helped to integrate global supply chains. So distribution centers and depots of small package service have spread across the country. Their spatial impact is very high, concerning traffic as well as land consumption or catchment area of jobs. But in spatial planning logistics does not matter. This text is trying to explain the different fields of logistics, the link between logistics and international supply chains and the consequences for the placement of logistic centers. For different fields in market different profiles on locations are explained. Those locations are often subject to rapid change. Often the time between the first idea for a logistic center and the planned date for its opening is short as well. This text is trying to show how spatial planning can manage logistics settlements. This meets interests of spatial planning and industry: Spatial planning e.g. can find a way to reduce land consumption or bundle traffic. Investors profit because a location that is part of a spatial of land use plan offers to opportunity for a fast project realization.

Keywords

  • Transport
  • Logistics
  • Regional planning
  • Regional development
  • Supply chain management
access type Open Access

Planning for Cross-Border Territories: The Role Played by Spatial Information

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 229 - 240

Abstract

Abstract

The authors argue that cross-border territories require not only an integrated approach to development, but also a form of cross-border governance that is democratic and pursues a multi-stage strategy in order to ensure accountability towards citizens and socio-economic actors and make certain that they are acknowledged and receive support at a regional and national level. At present, relevant statistical indices are lacking for most cross-border territories. Such indices are essential, however, for establishing a shared body of regional knowledge as a basis for developing joint policies and activities. Shared border areas presuppose that development takes place on both sides in order to overcome the negative effects of borders, to fully exploit the potential arising from the development of projects, and to address the needs of the inhabitants.

This article examines the part played by spatial information in the planning of cross-border areas. It examines the concept of “cross-border territory”, shows the diverse criteria applied in European regional planning as exemplified in the border region of France and Luxemburg, and considers which tools are available—from the standpoint of multi-level governance—for this purpose. Ultimately, it is a question of addressing the needs, challenges and potential offered by spatial information in a cross-border context.

Keywords

  • Cross-border cooperation
  • Cross-border territory
  • Spatial planning
  • Spatial information
  • Multi-level governance

Rezension

10 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

Spatial Patterns of Knowledge Forms. The Influence of Transaction Costs on Spatial Concentration of Knowledge-Based Services in the German Urban System

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 175 - 190

Abstract

Abstract

The increasing importance of knowledge as factor in economic processes leads to a reappraisal of economic locations. In this paper spatial consequences of this reappraisal are discussed using the example of the German urban system. Key functions in processes of knowledge production and knowledge use are knowledge-based services. Their locations as well as changes of their locations are of major interest from a geographic perspective. As theory supports assumptions about concentration processes as well as assumptions about processes of de-concentration, empirical evidence is crucial in this context. In this paper it is asked whether the use of different forms of knowledge leads to different spatial patterns of knowledge-based services, depending on the height of transaction costs. It is assumed that the more location specific and the harder to codify the used knowledge form, the more concentrated knowledge-based services that use the respective knowledge form will be.

Keywords

  • Knowledge-based services
  • Occupants
  • Urban system
  • Spatial concentration
  • Knowledge form
  • Transaction costs
access type Open Access

Adaptation at Regional Level: Challenges of a Regional Climate Change Governance

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 191 - 201

Abstract

Abstract

The implementation of climate change adaptation strategies mainly takes part at a regional scale. This scale refers to the functional and spatial dimensions of most climate change effects. Therefore, the regional scale is most adequate for processing cooperative governance formations, for progressing the regulatory framework, for implementing institutional innovations and conducting collective conflict solutions. One of the main findings in the new field of climate adaptation research refers to the necessity of an intersectoral and integrative cross-cutting issue for the consideration of climate change effects. The main aspects of an integrative perspective include a reconciliation of adaptation measures with global climate change mitigation goals, dealing with uncertainties in climate change scenarios, the integration of adaptation measures into various sectors and creating of acceptance for adaptation measures and their implementation instruments. These aspects lead to extensive discussion and coordination needs between governmental and civil society actors. This paper summarizes a framework of regional climate change governance and offers conclusions for the local practice and climate adaptation research. Referring to the action fields of spatial and regional planning, forestry and agriculture in the model region of Northern Hesse, generalizable good practice examples of institutional settings, governance formations and instruments for conducting successful adaptation strategies will be presented.

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Regional governance
  • Regulatory instruments
  • Participation
  • Integration
  • Dealing with uncertainty
access type Open Access

Transnational Strategies for Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts versus Local Needs for Adaptation? The Example of the Baltic Sea Region

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 203 - 216

Abstract

Abstract

Calling for a macro-regional adaptation strategy, the European Union introduced a new strategic level in the discussion on how to adapt to climate change impacts. Based on exploratory studies in three urban regions at the Baltic Sea Coast, Stockholm (Sweden), Rostock (Germany) and Riga (Latvia), the article discusses the contribution and added value of transnational cooperation with regard to adaptation to climate change. Furthermore, it addresses the question of which tasks should be tackled on local and regional or on transnational level. The analysis is based on documents, semi-structured interviews with experts and a participatory observation within a scenario-process. These exploratory studies point out that a transnational cooperation in the Baltic Sea Region could complement local and regional adaptation activities very well. The participants could benefit through exchanges of specific experiences among urban regions with similar problems, but also through a greater awareness for adaptation. However, the added value of transnational cooperation seems to be restricted, regarding for example how and to which extent local activities can be influenced or due to the matter of fact that the given institutional framework constrains the opportunities of action.

Keywords

  • Transnational
  • Macro-regional
  • Adaptation
  • Planning
  • Climate change

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Actual Logistics—Spatial Requirements and Challenges for Regional Development

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 217 - 227

Abstract

Abstract

The importance of logistics has increased during the last few years. Globalization and international division of labour have helped to integrate global supply chains. So distribution centers and depots of small package service have spread across the country. Their spatial impact is very high, concerning traffic as well as land consumption or catchment area of jobs. But in spatial planning logistics does not matter. This text is trying to explain the different fields of logistics, the link between logistics and international supply chains and the consequences for the placement of logistic centers. For different fields in market different profiles on locations are explained. Those locations are often subject to rapid change. Often the time between the first idea for a logistic center and the planned date for its opening is short as well. This text is trying to show how spatial planning can manage logistics settlements. This meets interests of spatial planning and industry: Spatial planning e.g. can find a way to reduce land consumption or bundle traffic. Investors profit because a location that is part of a spatial of land use plan offers to opportunity for a fast project realization.

Keywords

  • Transport
  • Logistics
  • Regional planning
  • Regional development
  • Supply chain management
access type Open Access

Planning for Cross-Border Territories: The Role Played by Spatial Information

Published Online: 30 Jun 2012
Page range: 229 - 240

Abstract

Abstract

The authors argue that cross-border territories require not only an integrated approach to development, but also a form of cross-border governance that is democratic and pursues a multi-stage strategy in order to ensure accountability towards citizens and socio-economic actors and make certain that they are acknowledged and receive support at a regional and national level. At present, relevant statistical indices are lacking for most cross-border territories. Such indices are essential, however, for establishing a shared body of regional knowledge as a basis for developing joint policies and activities. Shared border areas presuppose that development takes place on both sides in order to overcome the negative effects of borders, to fully exploit the potential arising from the development of projects, and to address the needs of the inhabitants.

This article examines the part played by spatial information in the planning of cross-border areas. It examines the concept of “cross-border territory”, shows the diverse criteria applied in European regional planning as exemplified in the border region of France and Luxemburg, and considers which tools are available—from the standpoint of multi-level governance—for this purpose. Ultimately, it is a question of addressing the needs, challenges and potential offered by spatial information in a cross-border context.

Keywords

  • Cross-border cooperation
  • Cross-border territory
  • Spatial planning
  • Spatial information
  • Multi-level governance

Rezension

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