Issues

Journal & Issues

AHEAD OF PRINT

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 5 (September 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 4 (July 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 3 (May 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 2 (March 2008)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 1 (January 2008)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 6 (November 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 5 (September 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 4 (July 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 3 (May 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 2 (March 2007)

Volume 65 (2007): Issue 1 (January 2007)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 6 (November 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 5 (September 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

11 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Die Komplexität der (Kultur-)Landschaft

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 89 - 90

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Social Constitution of Cultural Landscape

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 91 - 94

Abstract

Abstract

The article outlines the research heuristic which formed the basis of the joint research network “The constitution of cultural landscape”, the results of which are presented in the following contributions. From the perspective of sociology, political science, planning and social geography it was of interest how cultural landscapes are constituted through subjective attributions of meanings in everyday-speech acting, discourses and discourse coalitions, the coordination of sectoral institutional systems as well as (cultural) landscape understandings in landscape planning.

Keywords

  • Cultural landscapes
  • Social constructivism
  • Spatial development
access type Open Access

The Difficulty to Define “Landscape” or “Cultural Landscape” in a Generally Accepted Way

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 95 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Instead of striving to define ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ universally, the contribution highlights the multiple perspectives from which these terms might be regarded: They are valuable in academic and practical contexts exactly because they can carry heterogeneous meanings, because they evoke positive connotations and because they can tie together diverse approaches in spatial research. The article is intended to identify and describe central positions by pairs in the semantic fields of ‘landscape’ which are fraught with tension. The elements of each pair, e. g. normative versus descriptive or subjective versus objective notions of landscape, are to be understood as opposed poles between which productive frictions can arise. Furthermore the semantic differences between ‘landscape’, ‘cultural landscape’ and the related terms ‘space’ and ‘culture’ are discussed. The authors adopt a moderate constructivist perspective, which can be characterized as discourse-analytical in a wider sense: By analyzing and systematizing how other scholars employ ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ and how they define them in relation to other terms, the authors present second-order observations. One finding is that the constitution of the meaning of the words ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ always is a matter of perspective: It is crucial from which academic perspective (second level of observation) which processes of ascribing meaning (first level of observation) are studied.

Keywords

  • Cultural landscape
  • Landscape
  • Space
  • Culture
  • Second-order observations
  • Social constructivism

Schlagwörter

  • Kulturlandschaft
  • Landschaft
  • Raum
  • Kultur
  • Beobachtungen zweiter Ordnung
  • Sozialkonstruktivismus
access type Open Access

Subjective Construction of Landscape in Everyday Practice

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 107 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

In recent years, we are observing a growing interest in landscape by scientists and other experts as well as by people who live in it or make use of it. For most of us, landscape is an essential part of everyday life, being regarded as our natural surroundings. In this paper, an everyday perspective has been adopted to gain insight into the way meanings are conferred to landscapes by the people who live there. A case study approach had been chosen in order to cover a range of various types of landscapes. Three selected landscapes are characterized by changes in their function, design and use at different stages. It can be assumed that perceptions and attributions of significance are particularly intense when changes touch the individual’s daily life, e.g. in the context of experiencing the loss of familiar surroundings. The importance of the subjective approach proposed here is that it focuses attention on the construction of landscape as symbolic environment rather than as nature or scenery. The aim is to deepen the understanding of the subjective construction of landscape.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Subjective construction
  • Everyday life
  • Changes of landscape
access type Open Access

Discursive Constitution of Cultural Landscapes—the Case of Political Wind Energy Discourses in Germany

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 119 - 131

Abstract

Abstract

There are numerous ways to define ‘landscape’ or ‘cultural landscape’—a fact that can be irritating. We do not propose any “new” notion of landscape. By contrast we examine how ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ acquire meaning in political discourses. The objective is to introduce an approach to analyzing the discursive constitution of cultural landscape and methods by means of which it can be implemented. We draw on the post-structural discourse theory of Ernesto Laclau and we take two empirical analyses as examples: a nation-wide survey on issues of local landscape discourses and an in-depth study on landscape concepts and argumentation schemes in political discourses about the deployment of wind energy in Germany. The landscape concepts which are reproduced in the wind energy discourses sound familiar: ‘landscape as a beautiful, valuable area’, ‘landscape as an area under human influence’ and ‘landscape as something which is perceived subjectively’. However, the hegemonic discourse in favour of wind energy constantly disrupts the conservative landscape discourse which relies on the concept of ‘landscape as a beautiful, valuable area’. Certain argumentation schemes are employed to close the discourses and to immunize them against future disruptions. Generally speaking, landscape concepts play a subordinate role in wind energy discourses. In some cases, they are articulated in an instrumental, tactical manner.

Keywords

  • Landscape concept
  • Argumentation scheme
  • Regional planning
  • Discourse analysis
  • Post-structuralism
access type Open Access

The Concepts of Landscape in Landscape Planning: A Semantic Analysis of the Term Landscape in Local Landscape Plans

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 133 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

The meaning ascribed to the concept of “landscape” and the idea about how “landscape” is constituted, is a basis for setting up goals and measures concerning all natural assets in landscape plans, as e.g. soil, water or landscape scenery. Current research does not sufficiently address the question of how landscape plans refer to the concept of landscape and which ideal types of landscapes determine planning processes. This paper will shed light on the ideas about the use and shape of landscape, which are conveyed through local landscape plans. Therewith we are aiming to determine the role that landscape planning plays for the social construction of landscape. The research pursues a hermeneutic approach and is conducted by means of a qualitative content analysis of municipal landscape plans created between 1993 and 2010 in various regions of Germany.

The semantic analysis of the word landscape allows statements on ideas of how “landscape” should look like. This image equates to a narrow notion of landscape, implying that mainly areas characterized by traditional, peasant cultivation are interpreted as “landscape”. The identified notion of landscape is orientated on conservation rather than development. The current development of landscape and resulting imprint on an area is rarely being taken into account in a positive manner.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Landscape planning
  • Local landscape plans
  • Constructivism
  • Semantic analysis
access type Open Access

Sectoral Institutional Systems and the Governance of Cultural Landscapes as Regional Action Arenas

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 147 - 160

Abstract

Abstract

The article contributes a perspective of political science to debates on the social construction of cultural landscapes. For that purpose the conceptual relationship between constructivism and the dualistic theoretical approaches of institutionalism and governance analysis will firstly be discussed. Subsequently, the empirical analysis of the social construction of landscapes is documented concerning two fields of empirical observation: the field of sectoral institutional systems (nature conservation, heritage preservation, policy for rural areas, tourism policy, spatial planning) in a multi-level perspective, and the field of cultural landscapes as regional action arenas, where sectoral policies are operative and interact with each other. The logics of sectoral institutional systems are formative for regional agency. But they are modified mainly due to the existence of regional informal institutions such as spatial images, traditions, and attributions of the specific character of the landscape. These informal institutions have an important influence on the agency of stakeholders in largescale reserves, cultural landscapes on the list of UNESCO world heritage sites, integrated rural development projects or tourism regions. Their influence tends to be stronger than the influence of central formal and informal institutions. The paper introduces a typology of governance forms which are specific for the constitution of landscapes as action arenas, such as the strategic communication about historical or endangered landscape elements, the creation of thematic locations, regional marketing, and the invention of regional traditions. Informal institutions are used by collective actors as fundament of their agency. This can be characterised as a sort of strategic essentialism.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Constructivism
  • Strategic essentialism
  • Institutions
  • Governance forms
  • Sectoral institutional systems
  • Regional action arenas

Rezension

11 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Die Komplexität der (Kultur-)Landschaft

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 89 - 90

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Social Constitution of Cultural Landscape

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 91 - 94

Abstract

Abstract

The article outlines the research heuristic which formed the basis of the joint research network “The constitution of cultural landscape”, the results of which are presented in the following contributions. From the perspective of sociology, political science, planning and social geography it was of interest how cultural landscapes are constituted through subjective attributions of meanings in everyday-speech acting, discourses and discourse coalitions, the coordination of sectoral institutional systems as well as (cultural) landscape understandings in landscape planning.

Keywords

  • Cultural landscapes
  • Social constructivism
  • Spatial development
access type Open Access

The Difficulty to Define “Landscape” or “Cultural Landscape” in a Generally Accepted Way

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 95 - 106

Abstract

Abstract

Instead of striving to define ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ universally, the contribution highlights the multiple perspectives from which these terms might be regarded: They are valuable in academic and practical contexts exactly because they can carry heterogeneous meanings, because they evoke positive connotations and because they can tie together diverse approaches in spatial research. The article is intended to identify and describe central positions by pairs in the semantic fields of ‘landscape’ which are fraught with tension. The elements of each pair, e. g. normative versus descriptive or subjective versus objective notions of landscape, are to be understood as opposed poles between which productive frictions can arise. Furthermore the semantic differences between ‘landscape’, ‘cultural landscape’ and the related terms ‘space’ and ‘culture’ are discussed. The authors adopt a moderate constructivist perspective, which can be characterized as discourse-analytical in a wider sense: By analyzing and systematizing how other scholars employ ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ and how they define them in relation to other terms, the authors present second-order observations. One finding is that the constitution of the meaning of the words ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ always is a matter of perspective: It is crucial from which academic perspective (second level of observation) which processes of ascribing meaning (first level of observation) are studied.

Keywords

  • Cultural landscape
  • Landscape
  • Space
  • Culture
  • Second-order observations
  • Social constructivism

Schlagwörter

  • Kulturlandschaft
  • Landschaft
  • Raum
  • Kultur
  • Beobachtungen zweiter Ordnung
  • Sozialkonstruktivismus
access type Open Access

Subjective Construction of Landscape in Everyday Practice

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 107 - 117

Abstract

Abstract

In recent years, we are observing a growing interest in landscape by scientists and other experts as well as by people who live in it or make use of it. For most of us, landscape is an essential part of everyday life, being regarded as our natural surroundings. In this paper, an everyday perspective has been adopted to gain insight into the way meanings are conferred to landscapes by the people who live there. A case study approach had been chosen in order to cover a range of various types of landscapes. Three selected landscapes are characterized by changes in their function, design and use at different stages. It can be assumed that perceptions and attributions of significance are particularly intense when changes touch the individual’s daily life, e.g. in the context of experiencing the loss of familiar surroundings. The importance of the subjective approach proposed here is that it focuses attention on the construction of landscape as symbolic environment rather than as nature or scenery. The aim is to deepen the understanding of the subjective construction of landscape.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Subjective construction
  • Everyday life
  • Changes of landscape
access type Open Access

Discursive Constitution of Cultural Landscapes—the Case of Political Wind Energy Discourses in Germany

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 119 - 131

Abstract

Abstract

There are numerous ways to define ‘landscape’ or ‘cultural landscape’—a fact that can be irritating. We do not propose any “new” notion of landscape. By contrast we examine how ‘landscape’ and ‘cultural landscape’ acquire meaning in political discourses. The objective is to introduce an approach to analyzing the discursive constitution of cultural landscape and methods by means of which it can be implemented. We draw on the post-structural discourse theory of Ernesto Laclau and we take two empirical analyses as examples: a nation-wide survey on issues of local landscape discourses and an in-depth study on landscape concepts and argumentation schemes in political discourses about the deployment of wind energy in Germany. The landscape concepts which are reproduced in the wind energy discourses sound familiar: ‘landscape as a beautiful, valuable area’, ‘landscape as an area under human influence’ and ‘landscape as something which is perceived subjectively’. However, the hegemonic discourse in favour of wind energy constantly disrupts the conservative landscape discourse which relies on the concept of ‘landscape as a beautiful, valuable area’. Certain argumentation schemes are employed to close the discourses and to immunize them against future disruptions. Generally speaking, landscape concepts play a subordinate role in wind energy discourses. In some cases, they are articulated in an instrumental, tactical manner.

Keywords

  • Landscape concept
  • Argumentation scheme
  • Regional planning
  • Discourse analysis
  • Post-structuralism
access type Open Access

The Concepts of Landscape in Landscape Planning: A Semantic Analysis of the Term Landscape in Local Landscape Plans

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 133 - 145

Abstract

Abstract

The meaning ascribed to the concept of “landscape” and the idea about how “landscape” is constituted, is a basis for setting up goals and measures concerning all natural assets in landscape plans, as e.g. soil, water or landscape scenery. Current research does not sufficiently address the question of how landscape plans refer to the concept of landscape and which ideal types of landscapes determine planning processes. This paper will shed light on the ideas about the use and shape of landscape, which are conveyed through local landscape plans. Therewith we are aiming to determine the role that landscape planning plays for the social construction of landscape. The research pursues a hermeneutic approach and is conducted by means of a qualitative content analysis of municipal landscape plans created between 1993 and 2010 in various regions of Germany.

The semantic analysis of the word landscape allows statements on ideas of how “landscape” should look like. This image equates to a narrow notion of landscape, implying that mainly areas characterized by traditional, peasant cultivation are interpreted as “landscape”. The identified notion of landscape is orientated on conservation rather than development. The current development of landscape and resulting imprint on an area is rarely being taken into account in a positive manner.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Landscape planning
  • Local landscape plans
  • Constructivism
  • Semantic analysis
access type Open Access

Sectoral Institutional Systems and the Governance of Cultural Landscapes as Regional Action Arenas

Published Online: 30 Apr 2012
Page range: 147 - 160

Abstract

Abstract

The article contributes a perspective of political science to debates on the social construction of cultural landscapes. For that purpose the conceptual relationship between constructivism and the dualistic theoretical approaches of institutionalism and governance analysis will firstly be discussed. Subsequently, the empirical analysis of the social construction of landscapes is documented concerning two fields of empirical observation: the field of sectoral institutional systems (nature conservation, heritage preservation, policy for rural areas, tourism policy, spatial planning) in a multi-level perspective, and the field of cultural landscapes as regional action arenas, where sectoral policies are operative and interact with each other. The logics of sectoral institutional systems are formative for regional agency. But they are modified mainly due to the existence of regional informal institutions such as spatial images, traditions, and attributions of the specific character of the landscape. These informal institutions have an important influence on the agency of stakeholders in largescale reserves, cultural landscapes on the list of UNESCO world heritage sites, integrated rural development projects or tourism regions. Their influence tends to be stronger than the influence of central formal and informal institutions. The paper introduces a typology of governance forms which are specific for the constitution of landscapes as action arenas, such as the strategic communication about historical or endangered landscape elements, the creation of thematic locations, regional marketing, and the invention of regional traditions. Informal institutions are used by collective actors as fundament of their agency. This can be characterised as a sort of strategic essentialism.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Constructivism
  • Strategic essentialism
  • Institutions
  • Governance forms
  • Sectoral institutional systems
  • Regional action arenas

Rezension

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo