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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

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Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

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Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

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Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

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Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

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Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

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Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Raumwissenschaften als interdisziplinäres Forschungsfeld

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 289 - 290

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Home and social sustainable development of landscapes

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 291 - 301

Abstract

Abstract

Home and regional identity are topics that gain growing and controversial attention in the public and scientific discussion. Frequently home and landscape are understood as distinct objects. On the contrary, both home and landscape here are understood as constitutively socially constructed. Landscape as a social construct represents only one dimension of the social construct of home. Besides, other dimensions of home can be identified: the constitutive dimension of the social, that of well-being, that of time, that of spiritual home and that of marginalization. Crucial for the linkage between the social constructs of home and landscape is the individual acquirement of the construction of a “normal conditioned landscape of home” during processes of socialization. This construction serves as a basis for comparing landscapes as well as it includes a normative expectation of persistence of the socially constructed landscape attributed to physical objects. Due to this social expectation of persistence, changes in the physical structure of landscape are perceived as harassment. However, the target of sustainable development may even demand changes in the structures of physical objects, socially described as landscapes. Therefore the most important challenge of a sustainable development of landscape is to design main physical representatives of home in a way that minimizes the experience of a loss of home.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Social sustainability
  • Sustainable development
  • Constructivism
  • Home
  • Spatial development
Open Access

New Economic Poles in the City Regions of North Rhine-Westphalia: Postsuburbanisation and Restructuring of the City

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 303 - 317

Abstract

Abstract

The newest transformation of city regions is characterized by both the emerging postsuburban development in the urban periphery and the restructuring of the city. New economic cores (conceptualized as concentrations of employment or enterprises) are emerging around the traditional central district of the city and in postsuburbia together with new city-regional relations based on the division of labor. For the case of the city regions of North-Rhine Westphalia, this article examines this transformation using different approaches. We proceed from the assumption that the new economic cores within the city regions of North Rhine-Westphalia tend to be more autonomously in their function and range of responsibilities to traditional and new cores of the central city and that new relations between the cores exist at different scales.

Keywords

  • City region
  • Polycentricity
  • New economic cores
  • Networks
  • North-Rhine Westphalia
Open Access

Social Tariff Concessions and the Price Elasticity of Demand of Local Public Transport System in a Medium Sized Urban Area

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 319 - 331

Abstract

Abstract

The aim of the study is to calculate the price elasticity of demand for several local public transport products of a mid-sized German city (Jena) to estimate the potential subsidy requirements of social tariff concessions. The results of the ten year time series AR-model estimation show an elasticity coefficient of − 0.63 for a single ticket which is slightly higher in absolute terms compared with past studies but can be explained with the geographical structure of the examined city. The price elasticity of social concession-tariffs is significantly higher. This means that the income effect will be outweighed by the effect of lower demand of welfare recipients for (relatively inelastic) intra-city commuting.

Keywords

  • Local public transport
  • Empirical estimation
  • Price elasticity of demand
  • Social tariff concession

JEL Classification

  • R 48
  • C33
  • D12
Open Access

Zone Pricing—the Case of Water Use Charges

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 333 - 345

Abstract

Abstract

Regulatory water use charges aim at restructuring water uses according to scarcity of regional water services. Hence, a spatial differentiation of the charge design appears to be an appropriate means of water pricing policy. Similarly, the European Water Framework Directive with its requirement of regional water resources management and its focus on river basins and water bodies could demand or indicate regional differentiations. However, in Germany two water use charges exist mainly unrelated to regional scarcity patterns: a nationwide effluent charge and different water extraction charges in 11 German States. Moreover, in 2006 the federal government has obtained the competence to implement a nationwide charge on water withdrawal without any regional differentiations. Against this background, the paper analyses the scope and limitations of regionally differentiated water use charges in Germany. First, the Water Framework Directive is examined as to whether the so-called combined approach of both emissions and immissions requirements makes a regional approach for charges mandatory. Second, the paper investigates the main conceptual elements and options of a regionalisation and their ecological, economic, legal and political aspects. The authors conclude that regionally differentiated water use charges are feasible as well as justifiable. However, with particular respect to the environmental objectives of protection of coastal water and marine ecosystems an effluent charge should still provide nationwide incentives according to the emissions principle. For water extraction charges the authors recommend a nationwide regulation framework yet completed by legal options for regional differentiations on e.g. water body level.

Keywords

  • Effluent charge
  • Water extraction charge
  • Water Framework Directive
  • Regional differentiation
  • Combined approach
  • Water body

Rezension

Open Access

Anpassung an den Klimawandel – regional umsetzen! Ansätze zur Climate Adaption Governance unter der Lupe

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 347 - 349

Abstract

Open Access

Infrastruktur und Stadtentwicklung. Technische und soziale Infrastrukturen – Herausforderungen und Handlungsoptionen für Infrastruktur- und Stadtplanung

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 351 - 352

Abstract

Open Access

Geographische Risikoforschung. Zur Konstruktion verräumlichter Risiken und Sicherheiten

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 353 - 354

Abstract

Open Access

Grundlagen der Geo-Informationssysteme

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 355 - 356

Abstract

9 Articles

Editorial

Open Access

Raumwissenschaften als interdisziplinäres Forschungsfeld

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 289 - 290

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

Open Access

Home and social sustainable development of landscapes

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 291 - 301

Abstract

Abstract

Home and regional identity are topics that gain growing and controversial attention in the public and scientific discussion. Frequently home and landscape are understood as distinct objects. On the contrary, both home and landscape here are understood as constitutively socially constructed. Landscape as a social construct represents only one dimension of the social construct of home. Besides, other dimensions of home can be identified: the constitutive dimension of the social, that of well-being, that of time, that of spiritual home and that of marginalization. Crucial for the linkage between the social constructs of home and landscape is the individual acquirement of the construction of a “normal conditioned landscape of home” during processes of socialization. This construction serves as a basis for comparing landscapes as well as it includes a normative expectation of persistence of the socially constructed landscape attributed to physical objects. Due to this social expectation of persistence, changes in the physical structure of landscape are perceived as harassment. However, the target of sustainable development may even demand changes in the structures of physical objects, socially described as landscapes. Therefore the most important challenge of a sustainable development of landscape is to design main physical representatives of home in a way that minimizes the experience of a loss of home.

Keywords

  • Landscape
  • Social sustainability
  • Sustainable development
  • Constructivism
  • Home
  • Spatial development
Open Access

New Economic Poles in the City Regions of North Rhine-Westphalia: Postsuburbanisation and Restructuring of the City

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 303 - 317

Abstract

Abstract

The newest transformation of city regions is characterized by both the emerging postsuburban development in the urban periphery and the restructuring of the city. New economic cores (conceptualized as concentrations of employment or enterprises) are emerging around the traditional central district of the city and in postsuburbia together with new city-regional relations based on the division of labor. For the case of the city regions of North-Rhine Westphalia, this article examines this transformation using different approaches. We proceed from the assumption that the new economic cores within the city regions of North Rhine-Westphalia tend to be more autonomously in their function and range of responsibilities to traditional and new cores of the central city and that new relations between the cores exist at different scales.

Keywords

  • City region
  • Polycentricity
  • New economic cores
  • Networks
  • North-Rhine Westphalia
Open Access

Social Tariff Concessions and the Price Elasticity of Demand of Local Public Transport System in a Medium Sized Urban Area

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 319 - 331

Abstract

Abstract

The aim of the study is to calculate the price elasticity of demand for several local public transport products of a mid-sized German city (Jena) to estimate the potential subsidy requirements of social tariff concessions. The results of the ten year time series AR-model estimation show an elasticity coefficient of − 0.63 for a single ticket which is slightly higher in absolute terms compared with past studies but can be explained with the geographical structure of the examined city. The price elasticity of social concession-tariffs is significantly higher. This means that the income effect will be outweighed by the effect of lower demand of welfare recipients for (relatively inelastic) intra-city commuting.

Keywords

  • Local public transport
  • Empirical estimation
  • Price elasticity of demand
  • Social tariff concession

JEL Classification

  • R 48
  • C33
  • D12
Open Access

Zone Pricing—the Case of Water Use Charges

Published Online: 31 Oct 2011
Page range: 333 - 345

Abstract

Abstract

Regulatory water use charges aim at restructuring water uses according to scarcity of regional water services. Hence, a spatial differentiation of the charge design appears to be an appropriate means of water pricing policy. Similarly, the European Water Framework Directive with its requirement of regional water resources management and its focus on river basins and water bodies could demand or indicate regional differentiations. However, in Germany two water use charges exist mainly unrelated to regional scarcity patterns: a nationwide effluent charge and different water extraction charges in 11 German States. Moreover, in 2006 the federal government has obtained the competence to implement a nationwide charge on water withdrawal without any regional differentiations. Against this background, the paper analyses the scope and limitations of regionally differentiated water use charges in Germany. First, the Water Framework Directive is examined as to whether the so-called combined approach of both emissions and immissions requirements makes a regional approach for charges mandatory. Second, the paper investigates the main conceptual elements and options of a regionalisation and their ecological, economic, legal and political aspects. The authors conclude that regionally differentiated water use charges are feasible as well as justifiable. However, with particular respect to the environmental objectives of protection of coastal water and marine ecosystems an effluent charge should still provide nationwide incentives according to the emissions principle. For water extraction charges the authors recommend a nationwide regulation framework yet completed by legal options for regional differentiations on e.g. water body level.

Keywords

  • Effluent charge
  • Water extraction charge
  • Water Framework Directive
  • Regional differentiation
  • Combined approach
  • Water body

Rezension

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