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Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

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Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

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Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Die Rückkehr des Urbanen?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 77 - 78

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Young Elderly as New “Urbanites”? The Generation 50plus and Its Mobility Trends

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 79 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Senior citizens in general have different expectations regarding their life concepts and the spatial localization of such following their retirement. The ongoing scientific research on the residential mobility of the elderly discerns two contrary processes. Some presume the future senior citizens will act in an analogous way to the elderly nowadays. Thus upon retiring they will leave the city to relocate to the suburbs. Others foresee a trend reversal towards a re-urbanisation accompanied by the renaissance of the city for all age groups including the generation 50plus. These developments were the focus of a study conducted in three major metropolitan areas; the results are discussed in this article. The study assumed that as the generation 50plus grows older their lifestyles and places of residence among other things will differ from the senior citizens of today. The evaluation of the empirical data showed, that the respondents in the greater metropolitan areas did not intend to move to the suburbs upon retirement. Neither do the respondents in the suburbs plan to move to the city. In other words a tendency towards remaining in the current residential areas was detected for the majority of the respondents. Thus if one defines the renaissance of the city by the decreasing number of people leaving the cities, then we can also identify tendencies towards re-urbanisation in the generation 50plus.

Keywords

  • Re-urbanisation
  • Suburbanisation
  • Intentions to migrate
  • Generation 50plus
  • Metropolitan areas
access type Open Access

The Antinomies of (New) Urbanism. Henri Lefebvre, HafenCity Hamburg and the Production of Posturban Space. An Outline

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 91 - 104

Abstract

Abstract

The article examines some paradoxes of urban planning by referring to Lefebvre’s concept of space. It shows how one of the most prestigious projects of waterfront development and new urban planning in Europe struggles with the complexity of urbanity. The latter is taken as a spontaneous, non-instrumental experience of urban spaces which is strongly related to Lefebvre’s espace vécu and is hardly to establish within the rationales of modern planning. To show this, the article examines empirical data, pictoral representations and pieces of the masterplan to develop the idea that planned urbanity is an antinomy in the Žižekian sense: it makes urbanity impossible. Some insights are given into this problem which is regarded as a severe restriction of—albeit reflexive and well informed—urban redevelopment projects. In getting aware of these antinomies, further critical thinking on enhancing urban performances is hopefully fostered.

Keywords

  • Urban Sociology
  • Gentrification
  • Lefebvre
  • Production of Space
  • Urban Culture

Schlagwörter

  • Stadtsoziologie
  • Gentrification
  • Lefebvre
  • Produktion des Raumes
  • Stadtkultur
access type Open Access

Blowback for Renewables – Spatial Reorientation of Wind-, Solar- and Bioenergy Against the Backdrop of Declining Acceptance and Increasing Conflicts of Usage of Acreage in the Rural Zone

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 105 - 118

Abstract

Abstract

The forced expansion of renewable energy sources has induced within a few years time a cultural landscape of a new kind. The traditional natural scenery, dominated by agricultural parcels, islands of forest, and condensed areas of settlement, is continually being amended by decentralized power plants such as wind parks, solar and biomass power plants. Still we are far from the development of pure energy landscapes, as it is feared by local historic associations and nature conservation organisations. Restrictive regional planning, annual amendments to the principles of remuneration given in the Renewable Energies Act, as well as declining government aid are putting hard spatial strain on the renewable energy system. Yet pressure on the usage of rural space has been augmented by the present development and has led to new dimensions of competition for the usage of acreage. Thus, a discussion of the future role of rural areas as a location for new technologies seems appropriate.

Keywords

  • Spatial resources
  • Conflicts of usage of acreage
  • Decentralized energy production
  • Acceptance
  • Regional planning
  • Cultural landscape
  • Rural zone

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Participatory Planning with Elderly People—The Example of “Zukunftswerkstätten”

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 119 - 128

Abstract

Abstract

The increasing number of elderly people necessitates enhancing the local planning of municipalities for this target group and creating adequate conditions for the preservation of quality of life. As part of a project concerning planning for elderly people in the Rhineland-Palatinate city of Pirmasens, besides a representative survey and interviews with experts, the participative process “Zukunftswerkstatt”, a form of creative workshops, was accomplished in six different districts. This article points out, to what extent the creative workshops represent a suitable instrument to identify the desires and needs of the elderly and if these workshops can activate the older people to engage in the realization of their expressed needs.

Keywords

  • Housing of elderly people
  • Creative workshops
  • Planning for the elderly
  • Public participation

Schlagwörter

  • Wohnen älterer Menschen
  • Zukunftswerkstatt
  • Planung für Senioren
  • Bürgerbeteiligung

Rezension

access type Open Access

Challenges for Mountain Regions – Tackling Complexity

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 129 - 131

Abstract

access type Open Access

The Just City

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 133 - 134

Abstract

access type Open Access

Perspektive Stadt

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 135 - 136

Abstract

access type Open Access

Siedlungsflächen entwickeln. Akteure. Interdependenzen. Optionen

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 137 - 138

Abstract

9 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Die Rückkehr des Urbanen?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 77 - 78

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

The Young Elderly as New “Urbanites”? The Generation 50plus and Its Mobility Trends

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 79 - 90

Abstract

Abstract

Senior citizens in general have different expectations regarding their life concepts and the spatial localization of such following their retirement. The ongoing scientific research on the residential mobility of the elderly discerns two contrary processes. Some presume the future senior citizens will act in an analogous way to the elderly nowadays. Thus upon retiring they will leave the city to relocate to the suburbs. Others foresee a trend reversal towards a re-urbanisation accompanied by the renaissance of the city for all age groups including the generation 50plus. These developments were the focus of a study conducted in three major metropolitan areas; the results are discussed in this article. The study assumed that as the generation 50plus grows older their lifestyles and places of residence among other things will differ from the senior citizens of today. The evaluation of the empirical data showed, that the respondents in the greater metropolitan areas did not intend to move to the suburbs upon retirement. Neither do the respondents in the suburbs plan to move to the city. In other words a tendency towards remaining in the current residential areas was detected for the majority of the respondents. Thus if one defines the renaissance of the city by the decreasing number of people leaving the cities, then we can also identify tendencies towards re-urbanisation in the generation 50plus.

Keywords

  • Re-urbanisation
  • Suburbanisation
  • Intentions to migrate
  • Generation 50plus
  • Metropolitan areas
access type Open Access

The Antinomies of (New) Urbanism. Henri Lefebvre, HafenCity Hamburg and the Production of Posturban Space. An Outline

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 91 - 104

Abstract

Abstract

The article examines some paradoxes of urban planning by referring to Lefebvre’s concept of space. It shows how one of the most prestigious projects of waterfront development and new urban planning in Europe struggles with the complexity of urbanity. The latter is taken as a spontaneous, non-instrumental experience of urban spaces which is strongly related to Lefebvre’s espace vécu and is hardly to establish within the rationales of modern planning. To show this, the article examines empirical data, pictoral representations and pieces of the masterplan to develop the idea that planned urbanity is an antinomy in the Žižekian sense: it makes urbanity impossible. Some insights are given into this problem which is regarded as a severe restriction of—albeit reflexive and well informed—urban redevelopment projects. In getting aware of these antinomies, further critical thinking on enhancing urban performances is hopefully fostered.

Keywords

  • Urban Sociology
  • Gentrification
  • Lefebvre
  • Production of Space
  • Urban Culture

Schlagwörter

  • Stadtsoziologie
  • Gentrification
  • Lefebvre
  • Produktion des Raumes
  • Stadtkultur
access type Open Access

Blowback for Renewables – Spatial Reorientation of Wind-, Solar- and Bioenergy Against the Backdrop of Declining Acceptance and Increasing Conflicts of Usage of Acreage in the Rural Zone

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 105 - 118

Abstract

Abstract

The forced expansion of renewable energy sources has induced within a few years time a cultural landscape of a new kind. The traditional natural scenery, dominated by agricultural parcels, islands of forest, and condensed areas of settlement, is continually being amended by decentralized power plants such as wind parks, solar and biomass power plants. Still we are far from the development of pure energy landscapes, as it is feared by local historic associations and nature conservation organisations. Restrictive regional planning, annual amendments to the principles of remuneration given in the Renewable Energies Act, as well as declining government aid are putting hard spatial strain on the renewable energy system. Yet pressure on the usage of rural space has been augmented by the present development and has led to new dimensions of competition for the usage of acreage. Thus, a discussion of the future role of rural areas as a location for new technologies seems appropriate.

Keywords

  • Spatial resources
  • Conflicts of usage of acreage
  • Decentralized energy production
  • Acceptance
  • Regional planning
  • Cultural landscape
  • Rural zone

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Participatory Planning with Elderly People—The Example of “Zukunftswerkstätten”

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 119 - 128

Abstract

Abstract

The increasing number of elderly people necessitates enhancing the local planning of municipalities for this target group and creating adequate conditions for the preservation of quality of life. As part of a project concerning planning for elderly people in the Rhineland-Palatinate city of Pirmasens, besides a representative survey and interviews with experts, the participative process “Zukunftswerkstatt”, a form of creative workshops, was accomplished in six different districts. This article points out, to what extent the creative workshops represent a suitable instrument to identify the desires and needs of the elderly and if these workshops can activate the older people to engage in the realization of their expressed needs.

Keywords

  • Housing of elderly people
  • Creative workshops
  • Planning for the elderly
  • Public participation

Schlagwörter

  • Wohnen älterer Menschen
  • Zukunftswerkstatt
  • Planung für Senioren
  • Bürgerbeteiligung

Rezension

access type Open Access

Challenges for Mountain Regions – Tackling Complexity

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 129 - 131

Abstract

access type Open Access

The Just City

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 133 - 134

Abstract

access type Open Access

Perspektive Stadt

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 135 - 136

Abstract

access type Open Access

Siedlungsflächen entwickeln. Akteure. Interdependenzen. Optionen

Published Online: 30 Apr 2011
Page range: 137 - 138

Abstract

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