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Volume 78 (2020): Issue 6 (December 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 5 (October 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 4 (August 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 3 (June 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 2 (April 2020)

Volume 78 (2020): Issue 1 (February 2020)
TEMPORÄRE RÄUMLICHE NÄHE – AKTEURE, ORTE UND INTERAKTIONEN

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 6 (December 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 5 (October 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 4 (August 2019)
Integrierende Stadtentwicklung

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 3 (June 2019)

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 2 (April 2019)
Planung im Wandel - von Rollenverständnissen und Selbstbildern

Volume 77 (2019): Issue 1 (February 2019)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 6 (December 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 5 (October 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 4 (August 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 3 (June 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 2 (April 2018)

Volume 76 (2018): Issue 1 (February 2018)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 6 (December 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 5 (October 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 4 (August 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 3 (June 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 2 (April 2017)

Volume 75 (2017): Issue 1 (February 2017)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 6 (December 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 5 (October 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 4 (August 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 3 (June 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 2 (April 2016)

Volume 74 (2016): Issue 1 (February 2016)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 6 (December 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 5 (October 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 4 (August 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 3 (June 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 2 (April 2015)

Volume 73 (2015): Issue 1 (February 2015)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 6 (December 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 5 (October 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 4 (August 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 3 (June 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 2 (April 2014)

Volume 72 (2014): Issue 1 (February 2014)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 6 (December 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 5 (October 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 4 (August 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 3 (June 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 2 (April 2013)

Volume 71 (2013): Issue 1 (February 2013)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 6 (December 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 5 (October 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 4 (August 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 3 (June 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 2 (April 2012)

Volume 70 (2012): Issue 1 (February 2012)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 6 (December 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 5 (October 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 4 (August 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 3 (June 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 2 (April 2011)

Volume 69 (2011): Issue 1 (February 2011)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 6 (December 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 5 (October 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 4 (August 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 3 (June 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 1 (February 2010)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 5-6 (September 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 4 (July 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 3 (May 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 2 (March 2009)

Volume 67 (2009): Issue 1 (January 2009)

Volume 66 (2008): Issue 6 (November 2008)

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Volume 64 (2006): Issue 4 (July 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 3 (May 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 2 (March 2006)

Volume 64 (2006): Issue 1 (January 2006)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 6 (November 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 5 (September 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 4 (July 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 3 (May 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 2 (March 2005)

Volume 63 (2005): Issue 1 (January 2005)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 6 (November 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 4-5 (September 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 3 (May 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 2 (March 2004)

Volume 62 (2004): Issue 1 (January 2004)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 6 (November 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 5 (September 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 4 (July 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 3 (March 2003)

Volume 61 (2003): Issue 1-2 (January 2003)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 5-6 (September 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 3-4 (May 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 2 (March 2002)

Volume 60 (2002): Issue 1 (January 2002)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 5-6 (September 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 4 (July 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 2-3 (March 2001)

Volume 59 (2001): Issue 1 (January 2001)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 6 (November 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 5 (September 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 4 (July 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 2-3 (March 2000)

Volume 58 (2000): Issue 1 (January 2000)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 5-6 (September 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 4 (July 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 2-3 (March 1999)

Volume 57 (1999): Issue 1 (January 1999)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 5-6 (September 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 4 (July 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 2-3 (March 1998)

Volume 56 (1998): Issue 1 (January 1998)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

Volume 68 (2010): Issue 2 (April 2010)

Journal Details
Format
Journal
eISSN
1869-4179
First Published
30 Jan 1936
Publication timeframe
6 times per year
Languages
German, English

Search

10 Articles

Editorial

access type Open Access

Gasteditorial des Präsidenten der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft, Prof. Ernst Th. Rietschel

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 73 - 74

Abstract

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

What Kind of National Parks Does Germany Need?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 75 - 89

Abstract

Abstract

National parks are the oldest and most popular category of protected areas worldwide. They focus on two main issues: firstly the protection of nature, undisturbed natural processes and the conservation of biodiversity. Due to the long history of cultural landscapes and the comparably dense population of Central Europe multifold conflicts in land use evolve. Therefore this target is difficult to achieve. Secondly nature tourism is a goal of national parks – last not least to make the idea of wilderness tangible. Being situated in structural weak regions of the rural periphery, national parks can be seen as instruments for regional development. Outdoor recreation and tourism offer this possibility, especially in sparsely settled regions with further declining population figures. Spatial planning institutions should care for this development, thus creating new regional identities in lagging areas in the long run. 20 national parks are claimed to be sufficient for Germany. They are to fill the blank gaps on a representative map of Central Europe’s biomes, including moorlands, riverine forests, beech- and mixed deciduous forests as well as marine environments. Especially large interconnected woodlands and former military training areas offer possibilities for future declarations of national parks. In order to fulfill the requirements of nature protection and visitor management national parks should cover an area of at least 10,000 ha.

Keywords

  • National park
  • Wilderness
  • Nature tourism
  • Regional development
  • Rural areas
access type Open Access

Ecological Networks and Spatial Coordination

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 91 - 101

Abstract

Abstract

The term “ecological network” doesn’t refer to a clear-cut object of coordination but represents rather a metaphorical toolbox which one may use in spatial communication and coordination processes, but does not necessarily have to. “Ecological networks” and “fragmentation” constitute a pair of metaphors, which links description and prescription very convincingly. The metaphor “ecological networks” can facilitate cooperation of heterogeneous actors due to its vagueness. However, it also brings about the risk of detracting attention from major conflicts related to the conservation of biodiversity.

Keywords

  • Spatial planning
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation politics
  • Discourse
  • Planning theory
access type Open Access

Spatial Regression as a Useful Technique to Explore the Driving Forces of In-Migration in the Viennese Urban Region?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 103 - 113

Abstract

Abstract

In metropolitan regions population development is a continuous and dynamic process and in matters of analyzing it a huge variety of methodical approaches exists. This article introduces the simultaneous autoregressive model and the geographically weighted regression which can be seen as an innovative methodical enhancement of the usual global regression model. Using the urban region of Vienna as case study, the influence of “hard” location factors like land price, accessibilities etc. on in-migration for the period 2004-2006 is analyzed. The explanatory content of the approach as a whole and its additional value will be discussed conclusively, mainly with regard to newer, postsuburban processes in urban regions.

Keywords

  • Suburbanization
  • Urban-to-rural migration
  • Driving forces
  • Vienna (Austria)
  • Spatial error model
  • Geographically weighted regression
access type Open Access

The Changing Significance of Knowledge in Planning

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 115 - 125

Abstract

Abstract

Knowledge emerged as a relevant category in spatial development but gained less attention in the planning literature. This paper seeks to raise interest for the diverse forms of knowledge that are relevant for spatial planning. It is based on concepts from the social sciences, and a conception of knowledge application in planning processes is developed. These reflections allow for different way of thinking about planning and open new opportunities for theory development in planning.

Keywords

  • Knowledge
  • Planning
  • Expert knowledge
  • Local knowledge
  • Decision-making

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Spatial Proximity of Actors Matters for Sustainable Development

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 127 - 137

Abstract

Abstract

The literature often points out that the local and regional political levels are important for achieving sustainable development objectives. However, it is not sufficiently clear in what this importance consists. Looking at the example of the Ökoprofit management approach, the article discusses indications that towns, cities and regions do indeed show a specific capacity for facilitating sustainability owing to the spatial proximity of actors. Local authorities are in charge of implementing Ökoprofit projects in which companies engage in environmental management. The article draws empirically on the case of an Ökoprofit project carried out in Dresden, examining the social mechanisms at work.

Keywords

  • Sustainable development
  • Spatial proximity
  • Local and regional level
  • Environmental management
  • Environmental governance

Rezension

access type Open Access

Metropolregionen – Restrukturierung und Governance. Deutsche und internationale Fallstudien

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 139 - 141

Abstract

access type Open Access

Das Wissen der Städte. Neue stadtregionale Entwicklungsdynamiken im Kontext von Wissen, Milieus und Governance

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 143 - 144

Abstract

access type Open Access

Räumlich differenzierte Entwicklungs- und Förderstrategien für Nordostdeutschland

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 145 - 147

Abstract

access type Open Access

Altern in Gemeinde und Region

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 149 - 150

Abstract

10 Articles

Editorial

Wissenschaftlicher Beitrag

access type Open Access

What Kind of National Parks Does Germany Need?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 75 - 89

Abstract

Abstract

National parks are the oldest and most popular category of protected areas worldwide. They focus on two main issues: firstly the protection of nature, undisturbed natural processes and the conservation of biodiversity. Due to the long history of cultural landscapes and the comparably dense population of Central Europe multifold conflicts in land use evolve. Therefore this target is difficult to achieve. Secondly nature tourism is a goal of national parks – last not least to make the idea of wilderness tangible. Being situated in structural weak regions of the rural periphery, national parks can be seen as instruments for regional development. Outdoor recreation and tourism offer this possibility, especially in sparsely settled regions with further declining population figures. Spatial planning institutions should care for this development, thus creating new regional identities in lagging areas in the long run. 20 national parks are claimed to be sufficient for Germany. They are to fill the blank gaps on a representative map of Central Europe’s biomes, including moorlands, riverine forests, beech- and mixed deciduous forests as well as marine environments. Especially large interconnected woodlands and former military training areas offer possibilities for future declarations of national parks. In order to fulfill the requirements of nature protection and visitor management national parks should cover an area of at least 10,000 ha.

Keywords

  • National park
  • Wilderness
  • Nature tourism
  • Regional development
  • Rural areas
access type Open Access

Ecological Networks and Spatial Coordination

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 91 - 101

Abstract

Abstract

The term “ecological network” doesn’t refer to a clear-cut object of coordination but represents rather a metaphorical toolbox which one may use in spatial communication and coordination processes, but does not necessarily have to. “Ecological networks” and “fragmentation” constitute a pair of metaphors, which links description and prescription very convincingly. The metaphor “ecological networks” can facilitate cooperation of heterogeneous actors due to its vagueness. However, it also brings about the risk of detracting attention from major conflicts related to the conservation of biodiversity.

Keywords

  • Spatial planning
  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation politics
  • Discourse
  • Planning theory
access type Open Access

Spatial Regression as a Useful Technique to Explore the Driving Forces of In-Migration in the Viennese Urban Region?

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 103 - 113

Abstract

Abstract

In metropolitan regions population development is a continuous and dynamic process and in matters of analyzing it a huge variety of methodical approaches exists. This article introduces the simultaneous autoregressive model and the geographically weighted regression which can be seen as an innovative methodical enhancement of the usual global regression model. Using the urban region of Vienna as case study, the influence of “hard” location factors like land price, accessibilities etc. on in-migration for the period 2004-2006 is analyzed. The explanatory content of the approach as a whole and its additional value will be discussed conclusively, mainly with regard to newer, postsuburban processes in urban regions.

Keywords

  • Suburbanization
  • Urban-to-rural migration
  • Driving forces
  • Vienna (Austria)
  • Spatial error model
  • Geographically weighted regression
access type Open Access

The Changing Significance of Knowledge in Planning

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 115 - 125

Abstract

Abstract

Knowledge emerged as a relevant category in spatial development but gained less attention in the planning literature. This paper seeks to raise interest for the diverse forms of knowledge that are relevant for spatial planning. It is based on concepts from the social sciences, and a conception of knowledge application in planning processes is developed. These reflections allow for different way of thinking about planning and open new opportunities for theory development in planning.

Keywords

  • Knowledge
  • Planning
  • Expert knowledge
  • Local knowledge
  • Decision-making

Bericht aus Forschung und Praxis

access type Open Access

Spatial Proximity of Actors Matters for Sustainable Development

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 127 - 137

Abstract

Abstract

The literature often points out that the local and regional political levels are important for achieving sustainable development objectives. However, it is not sufficiently clear in what this importance consists. Looking at the example of the Ökoprofit management approach, the article discusses indications that towns, cities and regions do indeed show a specific capacity for facilitating sustainability owing to the spatial proximity of actors. Local authorities are in charge of implementing Ökoprofit projects in which companies engage in environmental management. The article draws empirically on the case of an Ökoprofit project carried out in Dresden, examining the social mechanisms at work.

Keywords

  • Sustainable development
  • Spatial proximity
  • Local and regional level
  • Environmental management
  • Environmental governance

Rezension

access type Open Access

Metropolregionen – Restrukturierung und Governance. Deutsche und internationale Fallstudien

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 139 - 141

Abstract

access type Open Access

Das Wissen der Städte. Neue stadtregionale Entwicklungsdynamiken im Kontext von Wissen, Milieus und Governance

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 143 - 144

Abstract

access type Open Access

Räumlich differenzierte Entwicklungs- und Förderstrategien für Nordostdeutschland

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 145 - 147

Abstract

access type Open Access

Altern in Gemeinde und Region

Published Online: 30 Apr 2010
Page range: 149 - 150

Abstract

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